Dendroboard banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone!
Kinda have a bit of a story to let u in on. Anyways after trial and error with trying to culture fruit flies i decided that my last mason jar of flies would be my final. So before i went to bed that night i decided that i would pitch the flies, i thought the culture wasn't going to work just like the rest. Well some how i fogot to do that and when i woke up the next day literally there was thousands of ff everywhere. So needless to say i did something right. Anyways i have a couple of qs now. Can i store the fruit flys in the dark or is it a must that they have light. Is light green mold threatning??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
How long were you waiting before tossing out the flies and what kind are you culturing? Also what medium were you using?

There are so many little things that can affect the production of your cultures. I have soem weeks where I have more flies than I need and some weeks (like this one) where I am barely producing enough flies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
I just recently switched to the Banana and Applesauce mix, and my cultures boomed with production. I used organic applesauce from Trader Joe's and 2 bananas which were not really over-ripe, but didnt exactly look fresh either. Instead of liquifing it, I manually mashed everything in a large bowl. You can find the recipe here... http://www.doylesdartden.com/fruitfly.html#MEDIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,961 Posts
In my experience, it doesn't matter if FF cultures are kept in the light or not. What seems to matter most is temperature and humidity. The more off the temps are, the longer the cultures will take to develope, and the humidity controls how fast the cultures dry out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
Not that it matters, but I found this interesting:

...in nature, adult fruit flies, Drosophila, emerge from their pupal cases during a short interval around dawn. At this time the atmosphere is cool and moist, allowing the flies an opportunity to expand their wings with a minimal loss of water through the still permeable cuticle. This procedure takes several hours to complete. As you can see in Figure 9.15, the relative humidity drops rapidly after the sun rises. If the flies waited until there was a change in light intensity, temperature, or relative humidity before beginning the preparations for emergence, they would emerge later in the day, a time when the water loss to the arid air could prevent the wings from expanding properly.
"Perspectives on Animal Behavior", Goodenough, Judith.

This came from a chapter on internal clocks, so no matter what the ambient light is, the flies may know what time of day it is anyway for many of their day to day functions such as emerging, breeding, etc. Maybe having the right environmental conditions such as moisture, food, & lack of predators (mites) is the bigger concern.

$0.02,

Marcos
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top