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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone my name is Corey and I am new to keeping poison dart frogs. I have just one frog at the moment ( dendrobates auratus) housed in a 40 gallon breeder tank. The tank temperature is kept at about 75 degrees and humidity stays around 85%. My question is in regards to feeding my frog. I've only had him for about 3 weeks and the few times that i've fed him I noticed that he doesn't get to his fruit flies in time before they disperse all over the tank. I have a ton of plants in the tank and the bottom layer is covered with moss and as you could imagine that makes very easy for the fruit flies to hide. It seems as though he is not getting enough food and I am growing concerned. Should I feed him more fruit flies? I don't want to overcrowd the tank with fruit flies but they all flutter away before he gets more than 5 or 6. Any response is well appreciated.

-thank you
 

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Hi Corey,

Can you share some pictures of the tank? We can help you get your tank setup to provide your frog the best care possible.

You'll find that the frog will go forage for flies when you're not around. I almost never see my shy frogs eating.

What supplement are you dusting the fruit flies with?
 

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After 30 minutes or so you can place a piece of fruit in a couple spaced places.

This is useful for frogs in new situ and they can be hypervigilent to predation. Hypervigilence in env can dominate the attention across taxa for small species.

This increases and expedites the number of flies he eats in a new situation and will let you check condition and assure you he is eating.

It does absolutely no harm and replicates fallen fruit, carrion, breeding swarms and other insect cluster opportunities in nature.
 

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A few things from me:
1. Remove the moss that's on top of the substrate, it doesn't provide any real benefit to the frog and likely presents more problems than you might imagine. It'll hold too much moisture, keeping things too wet for the frog.
2. Cover the substrate with leaf litter. Leaf litter is very, very important. It provides a hiding place, and a foraging place for the frog. A place to regulate the level of humidity the frog wants to be in.

Those are two important steps to getting the terrarium better set up for the frog.
 

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You should also get a springtail culture to add, if you haven't already. Springtails will live in the leaf litter and multiply, and will provide snacks.

He should hunt the flies down eventually. Hopefully before they wipe all the vitamin powder off.

How many times have you fed him? It should have been a fair number of times, in 3 weeks. Small frogs should eat daily, so you probably want to feed him at least every other day, more if he doesn't have springtails and things to snack on.
 

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By the next day a peeled grape will also occupy the FF within minutes after release in tank and in my observations it distracts them from self grooming to a significant degree. It works with all bugs, with different bait chosen for the feeder insect. I use fresh protien based bait for crickets, removed in 12 to 24, and mostly peeled grape for FFs, but mango is good too. I remove fruit the second night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So i've ordered the leaf litter and the springtail culture and they are on the way. Any other suggestions for improving my terrarium. More standing wood to climb on perhaps?
 
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