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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my toads, found in the wild, seems to have something up with her eyes. One is so squinted it's hard to even see her eye. The other eye is cloudy and gray. Should I be concerned? None of our other toads have this issue. She also seems to have a completely different personality than the rest. She tends to walk not hop. She's also very calm and doesn't seem to eat a whole lot. I'm worried she may be dieing. Does anyone have any thoughts or suggestions? I'm really bummed because she's one of my favorites 馃様
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Your gonna run in to problems if you take animals from the wild. The toad is probably experiencing lots of stress, personally I would release it back where you found it.
Problems will arise in critters from the wild or a breeder so releasing her is not a solution.
 

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Does anyone have any thoughts or suggestions? I'm really bummed because she's one of my favorites 馃様
You asked for suggestions, so I gave you the best one I could think of.

releasing her is not a solution.
I know it is hard to come to the conclusion of releasing an animal that you are attached to, but it鈥檚 for the toads and YOUR best interest. Just keep in mind, releasing it back where it came from would be much better than finding the toad dead in its cage.
 

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@Lola T , Since you made the choice to take them from their native life and are wanting to keep them, you are obligated to get them treatment from a veterinarian who treats anurans.

As for animals having problems in the wild as you stated, I would bet my right thumb that the eye problem presenting to your toad is directly caused by some deficit or influence of their captivity.

When deciding to take animals from nature we are also deciding to be generous in return if required.

Eye problems fall under the critical category. They severely affect the toads ability to acquire food and cause chronic stress.

This is because of all the toads senses - Seeing is their favorite.
 
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You could post info here (on diet, supplementation, time in captivity, species, enclosure photos, temps, etc) to possibly avoid whatever this is from affecting your other toads. It sounds as if the one needs a vet ASAP, though, to correct the issue that will likely be fatal if left untreated. You can search for an exotics vet here:

https://arav.site-ym.com/search/custom.asp?id=3661

I agree that wild caught herps are to be avoided, as they are far less likely to tolerate captivity than captive bred animals, and are far more likely to have pathogen loads that will increase in captivity without treatment.
 
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