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Hey guys

I whoud like to ask theres someone have experiece with Echinodorus species in vivariums? I rly love the Ozelote but i dont know how its living well dry. I use 2 type of Anubias and they just grow well i have to cut back many times before the overgrow. So someone can help me with Echinodorus espec with the Ozelote or the other dotted types?

https://scontent-vie1-1.xx.fbcdn.ne...=8104e3826b264acf3244c20b46dad776&oe=5E285366
 

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Sword plants need a lot of light-- so unless you're using a LED gro-light that looks ugly red / blue in a vivarium, you're better off using plants like anubias, cryptocoryne, or even peace lilies without cooking the frogs.
 

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Most Echinodorus also grow huge. Not in this genus but very closely related and staying small would be Helanthium species and the asian Ranalisma rostratum. H. bolivianum and R. rostratum grow well in "regular" vivarium light.
But all those species don't have any colourful patterns, they're just green.

I would also look into Cryptocoryne. There are a lot of species and breeds that have intensive colours and patterns. They also grow in low light, even prefer it.

Other plants that come to my mind and don't necessarily grow huge, tolerate wet to moist climate and have intensive colours and patterns are: Argostemma, Begonia, Fittonia. Argostemma are not really easy to come by though.
 

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Most Echinodorus also grow huge. Not in this genus but very closely related and staying small would be Helanthium species and the asian Ranalisma rostratum. H. bolivianum and R. rostratum grow well in "regular" vivarium light.
But all those species don't have any colourful patterns, they're just green.

I would also look into Cryptocoryne. There are a lot of species and breeds that have intensive colours and patterns. They also grow in low light, even prefer it.

Other plants that come to my mind and don't necessarily grow huge, tolerate wet to moist climate and have intensive colours and patterns are: Argostemma, Begonia, Fittonia. Argostemma are not really easy to come by though.
Thy for the answer mate! I already tryed 1 Cryptocoryne type! Its died out! The Anubias just grow very well!(might because its need way less light!) I use drip-wall technic and a most of regular tropical plants just might will die too! Thats why i searching aqua plants.
 

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one really good, yet invasive plant is hydrocotyle. I used to have it in my vivarium but it eventually took over. It's good in tadpole tanks as well as the adult frog tanks.
 

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Thy for the answer mate! I already tryed 1 Cryptocoryne type! Its died out! The Anubias just grow very well!(might because its need way less light!) I use drip-wall technic and a most of regular tropical plants just might will die too! Thats why i searching aqua plants.
Cryptocoryne are pure terrestrial plants that, when growing emersed are getting their nutrition mainly through their roots. You can mount them but then you will need a very thick layer of moss (preferably live moss).

When you say drip-wall technique does that mean that the plants get all their water only through the wet surface, or do you spray or mist, too?

Another easily available plant, closely related to Cryptocoryne that I forgot to mention: Lagenandra meeboldii "red". It grows without problems emersed and stays red even in lower light. But it also is no epiphyte, which means it needs a thick moss layer as well.

Let me see if I can snap a photo of one of my Crypto's.

I forgot which species that is, but it's an adult plant and still tiny. You can see the thick moss layer and it's mounted on a lava stone. It grows in rather strong light, though.
 

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I actually have to disagree with some of the comments. I've been keep swords for maybe 20-30 years, and compared to all other plants they are very low light tolerant (more so than anubias). when grown emerged, they do not get that big (at least i've never gotten them very big at all).

I do find them to be a little more difficult to grow than most other plants when not in aquarium. transition might be easier if you get the hydroponically grown ones so that you dont' have to adapt them. you can tell the emerged grown plants by tthe shape of the leaves--they will be rounder with a long stem. they also feel waxier, and thicker.
 
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