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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any particularly good ideas for breeding E. Tricolor? I have a St. Isabella morph, and was wondering if anyone has any good tips to get them to breed? All suggestions are welcome. Thanks.
 

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Brian,

The San Isabel tricolor became available in the early 90s here in the US. This variation is from the Rio Giron valley near San Isabel, hence the name. They were collected around 1,700m in areas with small streams and generally flat. The local plants were manly grasses or bushes and scrub. The daytime temps were around 80 degrees F. Due to the openness of the area the UV radiation readings were higher than what other variations of tricolor were exposed to. WC frogs have a distinct 3 stripe pattern that fades with successive generations of cb frogs. One theory was the lack of UV in captivity was responsible for the pattern loss. I have not read any research that tested this theory. The area these frogs come from is just east of an arid mountainous region which contributes to the higher temps.

Just a note: other morphs of tricolor will not have the same environmental perameters as San Isabel.

The tricolors I had back then bred like rabbits and are the only frog that I have witnessed courting, laying and fertilizing of the eggs all out in the open, on many occaisions. They used to lay eggs right on the pothos that ran up a piece of driftwood. I had a 4.2.0 group in a tall 30 gallon tank. I sprayed the tank morning and night which always put the frogs into a calling frenzy. The males will climb up to the tallest heights to call for females. They also fight a lot and are one of the best frogs to watch during courtship displays and competition for females.

Just some things to consider would be warm temps, high tank, multiple males and definately a water source such as a pond or large water bowl.

Males are definately semi territorial, meaning they will fight but not to the death; so have plenty of hiding places in the form of leaf litter and dense plantings.

Hope this gives you some ideas
Thanks
Eric
 

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tricolors

I just wanted to say that at one time I had a group of eight San Isabel tricolors and they really went to town. I also kept the temps around 80....mostly high 70's. Humidity was a constant 98%. Clutches of 15-25 were not uncommon. They would breed under anything- clay pots, cork, huts, cut plastic bottles, etc..... At one point I got sick of opening the hut to check for eggs and just left petri- dishes out in the open. They continued to lay on them, which was cool. The tadpoles had a tendency to jump out of their cups though, which was odd since my cups had an inward facing lip= harder to get out. I am now down to one lone female since the rest all either escaped or died from my ignorance.

Good luck!

Justin
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Justin,
I have heard many times that it is good to keep tricolors in large groups. I have only one pair. Would it be worth me trying to get a couple other adults to increase chances of breeding? Am I fine if I have just the two? Thanks for you help.
 

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tricolors

Brian,

I recently lost the male a few months ago, but yeah a pair works fine. Having eight of them was crazy- always fights and half the time only a few eggs out of about 50 were ever fertile. I think that the males were so combative that they barely had any time to fertilize the eggs. I would stick with the pair and see how that works.

Enjoy,

Justin
 

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tricolors breeding

I would say a pair should work, but almost everyone I have ever talked to about tricolors says they do best in groups. Since the calling of one male will spur another, so there is some healthy competition. I can't talk from experience yet, but I will be keeping one type in a small group and another as a pair. Maybe I will notice some differences so I can make a better judgement from my own experience. But I think either way you should get breeding. Also, the larger the group the more space you should give them. If they are crowded too much it might cause more fighting and loss of eggs.
 

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Re: tricolors breeding

jbeetle said:
I would say a pair should work, but almost everyone I have ever talked to about tricolors says they do best in groups. Since the calling of one male will spur another, so there is some healthy competition. I can't talk from experience yet, but I will be keeping one type in a small group and another as a pair. Maybe I will notice some differences so I can make a better judgement from my own experience. But I think either way you should get breeding. Also, the larger the group the more space you should give them. If they are crowded too much it might cause more fighting and loss of eggs.
Good point Beetle. Definately have a lot of space if you are going to keep groups.

Justin
 

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Brian,

Hard as it may be to believe, I had a group of 6 tris that I keep in a 10 gallon false bottom since they where about four months old and when they reached sextual maturuty they activly breed as a group in that 10 gallon tank. I was not sure what their sex ration was but I know I had a least two different males that activly breed with the females. I would probably not do it this way again but at the time I had very limited space so I did what I could get away with. Just my two cents worth of an experience.

Rob
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i had a group of 3 tricolors 2.1.0 that did well for years then a stunty type male died and all calling stopped for 1-1.5 years then i got 2 more which i still have not sexed,that set the remaining male off now he calls almost daily,still no eggs this year but calling is a good start,i do intend to get about 3 more this summer in hopes of good ratios,plus i have plenty of room in there 35 gallons to be exact

later
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