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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll try to keep this brief and succinct. I appreciate any help you can offer :)

1. What are some of the smallest nepenthes (total plant size, not just pitcher size)

2. Regarding any you suggest, what is the minimum temp it will grow at (hoping for something that will grow at 65-70 F)

3. Do they need acidic soil similar to many other carnivorous plants?

4. Can they take saturated soil, or do they need good drainage/drier conditions?

5. Can they take moderate to high lighting, or do they need shade? (I have 2x 24w t5 ho)

I'm considering these for my 29 G paludarium build

Thanks!
 

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High light, excellent drainage, acidity not as important as with bog lovers, but every one I can think of will outgrow a 29 gallon rather quickly. And if you prune it you will never get new pitchers
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
High light, excellent drainage, acidity not as important as with bog lovers, but every one I can think of will outgrow a 29 gallon rather quickly. And if you prune it you will never get new pitchers
Thanks for the info, that pretty much sums it up. It's disappointing that I won't be able to get a nepenthes, but there's always some other plant out there that I'll find that I "have to have" instead :D
 

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Put it in a windowsill. The intermediate growers thrive in a south or southwest window. I have a maxima throwing new pitchers on my porch right now. Day temps low 70s nights low 50s high 40s. Good humidity is PARAMOUNT to success. Try ventrata for your first plant... It's by far the easiest I've ever grown
 

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I have a Gymnaphora x Izumaea that is staying very small, but who knows how long that will last... Go to CP Jungle for awesome culture info
 

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High light, excellent drainage, acidity not as important as with bog lovers, but every one I can think of will outgrow a 29 gallon rather quickly. And if you prune it you will never get new pitchers
Ive pruned mine...all it does is send new growth up from the nodes and those leaves eventually form pitchers. Cp Jungles is a GREAT source of info and plants. He actually lives five min from me so Ive met the owner, very helpful...
ventricosa and burkeii are also good to start with..
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
UPDATE! Apparently one of the plants I saw that I liked (aside from nepenthes) was a Cephalotus...how are things looking for Cephalotus in the conditions I was wondering about in my original post? BTW I also found another forum called 'terraforums.com' that I might check out as well
 

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Ive pruned mine...all it does is send new growth up from the nodes and those leaves eventually form pitchers. Cp Jungles is a GREAT source of info and plants. He actually lives five min from me so Ive met the owner, very helpful...
ventricosa and burkeii are also good to start with..
Good luck!

But if you keep pruning you will never see upper pitchers which are often the most spectacular
 

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I've wondered the same thing, can cephalotus do alright in viv conditions?
cephs are notoriously hard to care for indoors in my experience. I have kept a few and my best attempt was a plant that i kept alive for over 1.5 years then died on me. They seem to be known for doing very well then suddenly dying, which is what i have noticed since mine would even produce new offshoots but then summer comes around and they die.

Their requirement for cool nights is why i wouldnt put them in the viv.

i feel a strange compulsion to be successful at keeping this strange and awesome plant so i will attempt it yet again this spring!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
cephs are notoriously hard to care for indoors in my experience. I have kept a few and my best attempt was a plant that i kept alive for over 1.5 years then died on me. They seem to be known for doing very well then suddenly dying, which is what i have noticed since mine would even produce new offshoots but then summer comes around and they die.

Their requirement for cool nights is why i wouldnt put them in the viv.

i feel a strange compulsion to be successful at keeping this strange and awesome plant so i will attempt it yet again this spring!
By no means do I claim to know much about cephalotus, but I just did some quick research and I determined 2 things-

1. According to International Carniv. Plant Society, the primary cause of cephalotus death is root rot. International Carnivorous Plant Society

2. There is conflicting advice on whether cephalotus requires a 'winter rest period' or not. Some sources say yes, some no.

I feel like my paludarium gives me a better shot at growing one of these than anyone with a dart frog viv...my paludarium is more open on top with much greater ventilation and less humidity, and the temps are lower...70 day, 65 night or so. I think I might be able to pull it off. I'll just need to make sure to place it in a raised area with good drainage
 

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You can provide cool nights... But can you provide the 20+degree temp swing that these plants and many Nepenthes need to thrive?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You can provide cool nights... But can you provide the 20+degree temp swing that these plants and many Nepenthes need to thrive?
Good point, I didn't know they needed a huge temp swing...like I said I had only done quick research. I will keep reading more to check on the details as you mention. As you know from our chats in other threads, the answer is "no" to the temp thing
 

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The key as I understand it for successful heliamphora, cephalotus and highland Nepenthes is the radical temp swing between day and night. I can vouch for Nepenthes success keeping them under these conditions, as well as heliamphoras ( which also like suprisingly high light)
I have never grown cephalotus but I hear the conditions are comparable
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

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I'll try to keep this brief and succinct. I appreciate any help you can offer :)

1. What are some of the smallest nepenthes (total plant size, not just pitcher size) Nepenthes argentii is the smallest species as far as i'm aware

2. Regarding any you suggest, what is the minimum temp it will grow at (hoping for something that will grow at 65-70 F) Highland species (argentii is one) should do find at those temps

3. Do they need acidic soil similar to many other carnivorous plants? they dont seem to be as picky as most cp's, i have grown them in more alkaline mixes with no probs

4. Can they take saturated soil, or do they need good drainage/drier conditions? Some species can grow in boggy conditions, others need more drainage. I always use a well draining mix

5. Can they take moderate to high lighting, or do they need shade? (I have 2x 24w t5 ho) They can take full tropical sun all or shade. The more light they get the shorter the plants and the better the colors
I'm considering these for my 29 G paludarium build

Thanks!
Hope that helps
 

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But if you keep pruning you will never see upper pitchers which are often the most spectacular
i find it quite the opposite. With the forms i have grown the uppper pitchers are generally green, wingless and vase like in shape. Lower pitchers normally have the better colors, large wings depending on species and that morefat chunky look to the pitcher
 
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