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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I wasn't able to find if this had ever been shown specifically not to work, but I don't think I've seen anyone post about it.

I put a cutting of Philo. scandens in an old, very large hardware store-bought bromeliad several days ago, and I was surprised to find that it hasn't withered yet. I don't know if that's due to the hardiness of the philodendron in question and the hydrating effect of water pools delaying withering, or if the plant can actually survive indefinitely there.

Things like Pothos are sometimes grown in water containers, so my guess is that if the bromeliad is big enough, and its water "pockets" (I don't know the proper term) consistently have some water in them, a small cutting of some hardy plant could survive in them. That is, unless the plant did something harmful to the bromeliad that is sustaining it.

But I also don't know a lot about epiphytic growth, or plant biology in general, either. Has anyone ever tried this, or seen evidence one way or the other?

Thanks.

EDIT: For what it's worth, I've also had a Vanilla Planifolia growing around the bromeliad like Christmas tree lighting for a couple of years, and in the last few months an aerial root found its way into one of those water pockets. It must have really liked it, because that root started developing tiny hairs along its length, almost all the way back to the stalk.
 

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I've seen primulina tamiana do this a few times. I had it mounted above a fairly large vriesea racinae and it used to flower constantly and drop seeds into the vriesea which would germinate and grow out from the bromeliad.
 
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