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I have heard to use both for tadpoles. Can anyone tell me which is the best for them and why??

I use the distilled and have never tried anything else.

Cheers!
Adam
 
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Have you sucessfuly reared tadpoles with distilled water? I always thought distilled water is missing all vital trace elements and minerals required for proper tadpole development. If you want to use distilled water, you need to at least add RO right made by KENT marine to replace those missing elements. Either that or use tap water and treat it with chlorine remover.
-David
 

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i have a friend that is a chemical engineer and very into herps. he told me that distilled water (from lacking in trace elements) will actually take these elements from your animals to balance itself out. thus robbing your frogs of those needed elements. i dont know how to explain it very well, but he went into all kinds of crazy detail and was very convincing!
 

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Josh is right. When the water contains no minerals or ions, it takes them from the tadpole. I avoid using RO water because it doesn't really have anything in it. I also don't use distilled water because it is purified by reverse osmosis, so it doesn't have much anything in it either. I like to use spring water. Making tadpole tea is supposed to help to add minerals and ions back into the water.

Has anyone tried adding a mineral suppliment dust to tadpole water?
 

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The use of highly pure water can lead to the loss of key trace elements from amphibians. The system will attempt to equilibrate or equalize across biological membranes and with time, your animals can lose important trace chemicals. This is not an all or nothing phenomenon as even totally or partially aquatic animals have the ability to maintain ionic disequilibria across their membranes (after all frogs don't swell up and explode when placed in pure water) but the highly pure water can function as essentially an infinite dilution reservoir so the equilibrium slowly shifts and the frog or other creature loses material.

Having said that, distilled water is not necessarily "pure". Standard distillation removes a lot of the junk dissolved in water (for example if you live in Indiana you are fighting with a boatload of dissolved calcium carbonate). So it is much better than tap water. However, in the lab we used to double distill water or run distilled water through a deionizing column to really clean it up.

I tend to use spring water or drinking water in my vivs.

Bill
 
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RO Water

I have been successfully rearing tadpoles in RO water with no problems for quite some time. Although it is true that the osmotic pressure created by highly purified water could rob minerals from the frogs, the osmotic pressure is much more easily balanced by pulling solutes from the food that the poles are eating.

In other words, if you just had the tads in the water alone, the RO water would try to pull minerals out of them, but when food (or anything else) is present, the water will pull from there since these solutes are much more readily available.

That said, it doesn't hurt any to add some electrolytes or blackwater extract or anything else to the water.
 

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I do not recomend anyone else does this before testing their local water first, but all I have ever used is local tap water for my tads and frogs and even my reef tanks. I had much better success with my local water than I did with RO, spring, distilled, etc.
 

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Re: RO Water

Cricket said:
In other words, if you just had the tads in the water alone, the RO water would try to pull minerals out of them, but when food (or anything else) is present, the water will pull from there since these solutes are much more readily available.
Bingo! The RO/distilled demineralizing myth has a grain of truth but is mostly myth. How many people plunk their tads into a glass bowl with distilled water and no food? If you did, then you would see the mysterious deminerlization phenomena. If you are like most people and throw in a leaf or two, maybe a sprig of plant, and actually feed your tads, then you have littel to fear from purified water.
 
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I think that the "pure water” concept is ridiculous upon inspection. Rain water is somewhat pure and seems to cause no problems that I am aware of. The idea of pure water would appear misguided for the most part since H2O in its pure molecular form is somewhat of a rarity, outside of the laboratory. When exposed to atmospheric gases (nitrogen, O2 and oxygen, primarily) the PH is adjusted to some degree. Of course if your frogs are in a vacuum than there may be a problem with pure H20 scavenging donors.
 

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peregrine said:
I think that the "pure water” concept is ridiculous upon inspection. Rain water is somewhat pure and seems to cause no problems that I am aware of. The idea of pure water would appear misguided for the most part since H2O in its pure molecular form is somewhat of a rarity, outside of the laboratory. When exposed to atmospheric gases (nitrogen, O2 and oxygen, primarily) the PH is adjusted to some degree. Of course if your frogs are in a vacuum than there may be a problem with pure H20 scavenging donors.
And by the same token, rainwater should not be assumed safe. Even in fairly pristine areas rainwater can contain a significant amount of ammonia and nitrate. This is not necessarily the result of human pollutants either. It should be remembered that before rainwater trickles into bromeliads, ponds, and streams in the wild, it has already gone through a significant amount of biological filtration that can remove much of these nutrients.
 
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