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If you want, but I wouldnt worry about it honestly. I would NOT CO2 bomb as excessive cold is much worse than bleach on delicate roots and new foliage. I guess I have always removed andys plants before use, I soak the mount in tepid water to soften roots, then carefully remove from mount.
Keep in mind that there are many sources of CO2. If they are small, then try using alkaseltzers for the CO2 source.... or even baking soda and vinegar and just place them in a container that is deep enough to let the CO2 displace the air. The reason the dry ice method is often desirable is because you can see the vapor displacing the air.

Have you considered simply quarantining the plants and dealing with the unwanteds in that manner? Unless the source of the plants has anurans in thier greenhouses, then the risk of parasites is already minimal....

Ed
 
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"cough" chytrid "cough"


Actually chytrid can easily be dealt with by either housing the orchids for a period of time at certain temperatures for example if all of the plant and substrate can be housed at 98 F (See http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_015234.pdf ) for a minimum of 4 hours (this means all parts at that temperature) then that will kill all of the chytrid. This won't affect other pathogens.

Instead of worrying about it, I suggest asking if he treats the greenhouses for pests as these treatments would typically wipe out any anurans in the greenhouse.

Ed
 

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are there any studies on how long chytrid can last without a host?
There are studies in the lab and some field studies. Keep in mind that chytrid doesn't tend to kill it's host when the conditions tend to be 75 F or higher so it can persist in an enviroment for quite awhile under those conditions. There is some speculation that chytrid can remain in an enviroment for weeks to months see for example Survival of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Water: Quarantine and Disease Control Implications. It is sensitive to a number of disinfectants as well as temperatures above a certain threshold (see the above post).

Ed
 

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If you want to go the temperature route >98F you have got to be careful that the orchid you chose can handle those temps for an extended time.
The time frame isn't that extreme.. at best 3-5 days should be sufficient as long as they remain hydrated..
But as I stated above, I doubt that there is much risk other than snails or slugs..

Ed
 

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i didnt read all the posts so i dont know if this was answered, but I know that if you soak wood in bleach but then soak it it pure water for a while (i usually do about 45 minutes) then it is completely fine for animals.

This is how I have always treated my wood and rocks for snake mites. I know most snakes are not as sensitive as an entire terrestrial ecosystem, but I don't think so many people would use the technique if it left any harmful traces. Keep in mind when soaking wood it is usually soaked for 30-60 minutes, while the soaking you are talking about would only be for 5-10 minutes. Im sure you can still do a pure water soak for 45 minutes right? Maybe even change it out once or twice.
Do you ever smell the wood or the rocks before reusing them? If they smell like bleach then they still have bleach present on them (I've done that and some materials even soaked for more than 24 hours will still smell of bleach).

The problem with bleaching organics like wood is that the bleach reacts with the wood and reduces in concentration which impacts the ability to disinfect.
With stones, the bleach can also react with organics in/on the rock that also reduce it's effectiveness. In addition, soaking something like wood or stones in a bleach solution doesn't guarantee that the bleach has penetrated the cracks and crevices of the items. The best you can typically do is give them a scrub in hot tap water with a good stiff brush and then allow to throughly dry.

Ed
 

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Well to be honest I have never really smelled it after soaking it. I didn't really have many choices though as my tank was infested with mites and the pieces were too big for the oven. I always scrub first anyway to try to get any dirt off. You could even go so far as to add dechlorinator to the pure water soak...that should take care of anything that is left over. Not that I would really recommend bleaching if you have other options, but if you have to bleach the plant, I think doing the wood would be ok if it is attached. No personal experience though, so I'm not doubting you. It would make sense if the bleach doesn't even do anything because of the organic material.

Never ever ever bake rocks.... It is hazardous to your health and to the safety of the oven. If there is water trapped inside the rock, it can cause the rock to explode as it expands and (if hot enough) turns to steam. The rock can explode after it is removed from the oven before it become cool enough to reduce the pressure from the expanding water. It can explode like a small handgernade... and the hot flying shards can really hurt you or anyone else near by.

Ed
 
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