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ive noticed that under different lights (or if i filter the light with coffee filters or other paper) my turquoise and bronze auratus 'change color', for example i have a LED light and if i shine it on them they turn a bright blue, or if i use an Eclipse natural daylight they turn a metallic green,has anyone experienced this,or knows why it happens?:confused:
 

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It depends on the wavelengths coming from the light interacting (or not interacting) with the different chromatophores (which include iridiopores, melanopores, xanthopores, erytropores..) and then reflecting from the frogs. Blue is a result of light reflecting off of the iridopores.


Ed
 

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wow, it's amazing. i once noticeed it,too. It is do have sth with wave length. But LED Strip itself is available in various emitting colors. Working with dmx led controllers or rgb dimmers, led strips have millions of color and 256 grey levels.
 

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if you want to think of it more simply, its kind of like how when your outside and on some days the color in everything is brought out because of the way the clouds block some of the rays from the sun. Different light filters block different colors from reaching objects and therefore changes the blend of color!
 

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Different are used in aquariums alot to highlight specific color. I mean 8000-10000K lamp will highlight blue when 2700K will highlight red / yellow.
For my next biuld i'm thinking about 2 T5 fluorescent lamps: one for 8000K the other for 2700K in addition with ~5 LEDs to create light rays with more specific accents in the viv.
Thus the goal is to create light that will force blue & red colors & LEDs to make god rays.
 

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The same is true of corals at different light levels and spectrums. The same coral that looks browned out and rather unattractive at lower kelvin levels often turns into an amazing splash of neon color at higher kelven levels.
 

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LOL "god rays". That's a great way to put it :)
 
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