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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have lost some ferns in my 18x18x18 Eco Terra terrarium.
What do you think went wrong?
Humidity is 80% daytime and close to 100% at night.
False bottom, with ABG mix - Water no where near the false bottom.
Temperature is around 82'f right now on my Exo Terra gauge. I'm going to reduce the light to lower the temp. Would you think it temperatures are too high or not enough air circulation?

Houses two Azureus frogs.
Thought please!?!

Flower Plant Terrestrial plant Flowering plant Nepenthes


Still life Plant Flower


Plant Flower Amphibian Frog Organism
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Also, what are you using to gauge humidity? I see you are using the exo terra thermometer. Generally speaking, those coil type gauges rarely last long in vivarium conditions.
Yes, thank you. I heard that the Exo Terra gauges are not very accurate. So I also put in a digital gauge also. I notice the digital humidity gauge might show 90% and the Exo Terra will show 80% at the same time. I'm guessing that the digital one is right?

Steverd
 

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some ferns are finnicky, they don't always like to have moist feet and high humidity. My guess is that the type you chose didn't like the conditions.

I myself have had very limited success with your commonly available houseplant ferns. They may survive for a while, but they always seem to die back. you may want to try something like the ET fern, caterpillar fern, rabbits foot or something, and not plant the roots into the moist substrate. Grow them more as an epiphyte, and you should have better success.
 

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I would agree with much here, but want to point out that, in my tank, volunteer ferns do show up on occasion. Got a Pteris cretica with over a dozen fronds growing on a moss-covered lava rock--I honestly have no idea how it got there (I wonder if the spores come in on or in plants from Black Jungle--have heard that greenhouses often get lots of volunteer ferns, pileas, etc....)

Now, my tank is way warmer than your PDF tanks; can get to high 80s in summer. Yet this fern, with constant moisture (not wetness) and 75-80% humidity, does fine.

Fern facts I have learned:

--Most do not like wet substrates. Moist, not wet, with good drainage. Marsilea and Water Sprite are exceptions. (Of course, Java fern and some Bolbitis not only want a wet substrate but super-high humidity.)
--Most do not tolerate being moved. Meaning, it is not easy to get a "big" plant (4" pot from the nursery) and just stick in your substrate--they will shock and/or rot. Much better to start with small specimens and place them on top of the substrate with just a bit of NZ sphag to hold them in place, or in a crevice with most excellent drainage.
--Not all are suited to terrarium life. MantellaPrince is right on about Davallia and Humata, ET fern and Caterpillar fern all grow well on top of the substrate; Pteris grow well on rocks; Microgramma can grow in moist tanks on the back wall. As for Birdsnest and Staghorns, these can be mounted only in huge tanks (These grow slowly but will get big. And to repeat, four years from now they will not take kindly to being torn off their mooring.) So no, I will never move the Pteris--and expect it to live. As for Hemionitis, I hear good things but have never tried it.
--Definitely lower the temps until the plants are established. Once established, many ferns and other "intermediate" tropicals will tolerate warm days as long as there is a real (5-10d) temperature reduction at night.
--Oh yeah: good drainage:D
 
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I would agree with much here, but want to point out that, in my tank, volunteer ferns do show up on occasion. Got a Pteris cretica with over a dozen fronds growing on a moss-covered lava rock--I honestly have no idea how it got there (I wonder if the spores come in on or in plants from Black Jungle--have heard that greenhouses often get lots of volunteer ferns, pileas, etc....)

Now, my tank is way warmer than your PDF tanks; can get to high 80s in summer. Yet this fern, with constant moisture (not wetness) and 75-80% humidity, does fine.

Fern facts I have learned:

--Most do not like wet substrates. Moist, not wet, with good drainage. Marsilea and Water Sprite are exceptions. (Of course, Java fern and some Bolbitis not only want a wet substrate but super-high humidity.)
--Most do not tolerate being moved. Meaning, it is not easy to get a "big" plant (4" pot from the nursery) and just stick in your substrate--they will shock and/or rot. Much better to start with small specimens and place them on top of the substrate with just a bit of NZ sphag to hold them in place, or in a crevice with most excellent drainage.
--Not all are suited to terrarium life. MantellaPrince is right on about Davallia and Humata, ET fern and Caterpillar fern all grow well on top of the substrate; Pteris grow well on rocks; Microgramma can grow in moist tanks on the back wall. As for Birdsnest and Staghorns, these can be mounted only in huge tanks (These grow slowly but will get big. And to repeat, four years from now they will not take kindly to being torn off their mooring.) So no, I will never move the Pteris--and expect it to live. As for Hemionitis, I hear good things but have never tried it.
--Definitely lower the temps until the plants are established. Once established, many ferns and other "intermediate" tropicals will tolerate warm days as long as there is a real (5-10d) temperature reduction at night.
--Oh yeah: good drainage:D
 
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