Dendroboard banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,916 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I am looking for any information for D. truncatus, most importantly lines and import dates. I am especially interested in any clues about "Blue" lines.
Thanks in advance,
-Field
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Bumping this...any info is better than nothing.

I have seen photos of both yellow and green morphs in Parks near Santa Marta Colombia, such as Tayrona National park. Next time I visit in-laws I will try to hit the park and take pics.

Since these frogs are Colombian orig, they would have come in the early 90s with some later imports from Europe or Canada. Good luck finding actual people w details. There might be some old timers w old price lists that could help. I might still have some in my house... so far no luck finding them. Some time ago, I looked at old import lists but most frogs are listed as "2200 Dendrobates or Auratus... and 15 Histronicus... yeah right..

If I run across any specific info in the future I will share
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,916 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So I know this is kind of a gray-area for many keepers...feel free to PM or even email me (tlsmit6000[AT]northgeorgia.edu) with any info, I would truly appreciate it. A big thank you to those that have already replied and PMed, every little bit helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,684 Posts
I'm not sure it's a gray area as much as most keepers don't know enough to answer this. D. truncatus are my favorite Dendrobates species so I looked into it nearly 10 years ago now and the info hasn't changed much.

The yellow animals may be from blood from different areas of Colombia, but over the years there have been so few animals that it hasn't likely mattered where the original populations came from (if they were known). They are well within the variation seen in populations in the wild, and actually show less variation that at least one "yellow" population I've seen recently!

Of the yellow there may be "two" lines, but at least in a few cases they have already been crossed. Animals imported by Bill Samples were known to be a nice strong yellow with a little gold dusting on their leg markings (most of the time by not always). If you look on the truncatus caresheet, the top and the bottom photos are of a pair I had that was likely pure "Samples" line. I believe these are the "early 90s" animals talked about earlier.

A second "line" was imported from Europe by Black Jungle, and I know they imported at least two animals that were male as they had a European male with a Samples line female (at least at one point I think this was the case and that may be the pair that is still producing for them. I got the other male, but he did poorly for me and died shortly after giving me my first fertile clutch. I consider it a nice injection of genes either way. The original male and the animals resulting from black jungle often had leg markings that often didn't have the gold brushed look to them, and typically showed up as more of a white color (photos 2, 3, and 4 from the top on the caresheet). I don't remember the exact date, but this would have been around late 2001 and early 2002 that I got the male from BJ.

They aren't distinct lines anymore, and I'm not sure if any other have been brought in from Europe. If they they have, I'd love to hear about it because getting fresh blood would be great!

The "blue" animals are more of a pale sky blue/green, and have thinner stripes than the yellow populations. As far as I know they all trace back to Todd Kelley's group. I'm happy to see that there has been more recent success with them and there are a few pairs breeding so they may become a little more available. These are probably another early 90s and I'd have to pester Todd to get better information.

There may be some more recent stuff that I've not kept up with that I'd love to hear about, I think these guys are fun frogs that deserve just as much attention as Auratus :)

I know there was that one guy (Coloran) that supposedly (going by his website) was legally working with a nice broad striped chrome green trunc (as well as auroteania, auratus and bicolor) that he could export, but as far as I know he has not responded to attempts to get in contact with him to see if/when he'd actually be allowed to do this. It would be nice to get legal Colombian frogs with locality data for once :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,684 Posts
Just as we were talking about on Facebook! It's another case where providing a basking spot may be beneficial like with some other PDFs. In the past I had animals that seemed to enjoy having different light levels in different parts of the tank - these days I would probably also provide a spotlight for heat and UV basking as well. My leucs are being set up that way for sure as they seem to have similar habits.

This also begs the question of the habitat preferences of the Colombian species.... What makes the habitat different that truncatus enjoy versus what auratus enjoy, or the various phyllobates? Or even the obligate species? The hobby has tended to generalize, but I would like to know what makes the environment different enough to produce different species, and which species may overlap in a place but have different niches in particular like the bicolor and histos in the blog (which have different food and tadpole deposition sites to reduce direct competition).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
As for the different niches:
O.histrionica, Ph. bicolor and Andinobates fulguritus within 5 meters from each other.

Histrionica couples were sitting on one "treestump" each (actually was bamboo) about 60 cm above the ground, no bromeliads in sight. They probably used cut bamboo for tadpole deposition.
Bicolor was sitting in a dark and dense structured spot on the ground. Again we did not find any bromeliads close by.
Fulgurita was climbing on branches and bamboo maybe 1.5 to 3 meters above ground. Hard to find, but they were close to bromeliads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
I'm not sure about the blue line I think John Uhern brought them in from Europe in the 90's. I was the first to bring in the yellow line and I distributed close to 100 animals - tadpoles and adults. They were imported into England illegally and confiscated, but later release to a few people who breed them. I got some of the captive breed from Malcolm Peaker (I believe that was his last name) in the north, Scotland I think, and a couple who also breed them in England whose name escapes me now. On a trip to California Malcolm brought me a number of frogs and tadpoles which I distributed to a number of people who were suppose to supply frogs in exchange. I never got the frogs to send back to England and didn't follow through on my own, and its my most shameful act in this hobby - not following through with that trade. It's probably been 20 years now and I should have made it right.

Best,

Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Maybe interesting for those of you who keep truncatus: They love basking and live in pretty much any habitat you can imagine.
Got some pictures of truncatus in my blog...
Blogotá
This is great info - Thanks

when you observed them in the wild, did they tend to pair off or did you notice them in groups?

What part of Colombia did you take your photos of the truncs? Did you see any blue/green on that trip or any prior?

Thx
Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Anyone here who has the location of the blue truncatus? PM me please ;-) Just for taking some pictures...
An older thread on this board had a poster saying the blue truncs were from the Choco region (not exactly site specific). Another fellow had a website (stated earlier in this post) of someone exporting Orchids and frogs legally ( a few people emailed the guy - me also- but he never responded. Seems that website host was older) - this guy (maybe Dutch) was from Cauca and had pics of truncs with much broader blue strips. So its possible you could find Truncs that far west. In a different state, I saw a pic that someone had taken in Tayrona Ntl Park (Santa Marta) of a green Trunc - they asked if anyone knew what kind of frog it was. There was not a response post, but I am 98% it was a Trunc.

Next time I visit my mother in law, the wife was going to take me to Santa Marta and another park @ Magdalena river where she used to swim as a kid. I was hoping to get some pics of the frogs and habitat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Hey Scott,

sorry, did not see there was another question :)
Pics were taken in the western part of Cundinamarca, a few hours by bus from Bogotá. I would tell you the exact location but I forgot the name of the Village. Probably was something in spanish :p
No blue frogs there, all of them were yellow. The first frog we found was basking alone by himself. The others we found (about five, including tadpole transporting males) were in a shady humid hut with all kinds of waste and garbage...and rats. Thats where the deposition sites were. At least the ones we found.
You could say there was a kind of density in the population there, but that`s because of the depositon sites and the readily available food. The hut was close to the pigsty....

Greetings
Andreas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,775 Posts
It's great to finally see some info on these guys... I'm really surprised nobody ever mentions them to new froggers as viable options for first frogs.

Hey Scott,

sorry, did not see there was another question :)
Pics were taken in the western part of Cundinamarca, a few hours by bus from Bogotá. I would tell you the exact location but I forgot the name of the Village. Probably was something in spanish :p
No blue frogs there, all of them were yellow. The first frog we found was basking alone by himself. The others we found (about five, including tadpole transporting males) were in a shady humid hut with all kinds of waste and garbage...and rats. Thats where the deposition sites were. At least the ones we found.
You could say there was a kind of density in the population there, but that`s because of the depositon sites and the readily available food. The hut was close to the pigsty....

Greetings
Andreas
Those photos really made me miss Bogota. All I found on my trip were tadpoles, hopefully I'll have better luck this August.

Be sure to stop by the Universidad de Los Andes and have a look at Dr. Amezquita's collection if you can, it's fantastic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Hey Scott,

sorry, did not see there was another question :)
Pics were taken in the western part of Cundinamarca, a few hours by bus from Bogotá. I would tell you the exact location but I forgot the name of the Village. Probably was something in spanish :p
No blue frogs there, all of them were yellow. The first frog we found was basking alone by himself. The others we found (about five, including tadpole transporting males) were in a shady humid hut with all kinds of waste and garbage...and rats. Thats where the deposition sites were. At least the ones we found.
You could say there was a kind of density in the population there, but that`s because of the depositon sites and the readily available food. The hut was close to the pigsty....

Greetings
Andreas
Hi Andreas
Thx for sharing the info. Look forward to more pics if you get any.

Trash heaps and rats oohh my.... I guess its good for the frogs to be so adaptable with human invasion.

I bet you were in Tobia (or a place near) - were there tourist? Its where people go to escape the cold polluted air of Bogota. I have not been able to visit yet, but if that is where you found frogs I will make a point next time :)

I sure appreciate your observations about basking. I have a 2.2 Yellow Trunc group and I have plans to add some starfire glass to the lid for UVB transmission. I will prob only run the bulb a few hours a day.

Regards
Scott
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top