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IMO - Yes.

We are trying to make the care sheets as representative as possible. So a nice sampling of what is currently out there would be great.

Can you try to get a number of pics of adults as well Aaron? Why froglet pics are great, I think adult pictures are more descriptive. Froglet pics would work great for froglet/adult comparisons.
 

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kewl, good idea.
well the escudos can go in the easy(intermediate) category. they are bold, eat big food for their size and quickly become obese when overfed.
i`ll have pics tomorrow. i have a really nice yellow no spot basti and i`ll try to get pics of all my uyama rivers and the rio branco pair, there first clutch and the latest froglets to show variability and how they change pattern and color as they mature. i`ll get some escudo pics too. they`re pretty variable too. from silvery blue to purple-blue to sky blue and some just have a little red to all red on top. i don`t have any of the all blue ones but hopefully i`ll produce some soon! :D
any of the following adults:
goldust/orange/yellow/red bastis
chiriqui rivers
man creek
uyama river
rio branco
escudos
yellow bellies
here are some to dwell on. i think most of them are uyama river.






can`t use these as they are the ones from sndf that i picked them from. i can take more and have some somewhere if you want to add them.
any thought on what these guys are.
i`ll add the other pics to my gallery and you can pic thru them instead of me posting them 1 by 1, if that`s ok.
 

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I would say it's from a different population of Uyamas before I'd say it's a Cristabol. The irregularity of the dots and the base colors suggest this to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
I'd second a separate population. But if you have to guess, does it really matter how they're mixed? I'm seeing more people just lumping all of these new imports as Rio/Christo, which leads me to believe that they're being interbred.
 

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well, the rios and the christos seem to be more look alikes than the uyamas and anyone else. although my christo/rio pair has thrown offspring that look very similar to the pink/blue male at the top. the more spotted patterning kinda has me confused but these 5 looked completely different than any of the other orange/red frogs in the pics for this shipment. i`m leaving that one out till i find out more. i think i have 1.5 or 2.4 anyway so i`d have her and one other extra female anyway. the one i didn`t show a pic of looks just like the uyama on tropical experience.nl

i`ll really try and get those pics today. i have some pics on paper towel of the uyamas but it`d look better in their natural habitat. i`m sure any of those pics could be used. i`d just have to ask valentina. i`m sure she`d be flattered and happy we used her pics if you guys/gals like any of them.
 

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ok, i know, they aren`t cropped. sorry, i barely had time to get them and the pumilio weren`t cooperating.
























i may be able to get more tomorrow and i`ll try and learn how to crop them and if i have the right program to do it.
 

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Ok all please proof this. I have added a bit of info, notes, and links. Trying to pull from what I know and what was posted here.

I think for the basic version it is close, but I did raise the level to advanced and while I agree the care of the parents maybe intermediate the overall care is not. Breeding and care for the froglets alone in my opinion keeps them in the upper ratings.

I do still think we need a bit more info on the care of the young which I will think more on...
 

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I think we should put a brief paragraph on pulling froglets soon after morping, versus letting them remain in an established tank to feed off of the microfauna for a few weeks/months, and then pulling them.

Personally, I yank the froglets after they have made their way out of the broms and immediately transfer them to individual froglet containers seeded with springtails, and then begin feeding FFs (first dwarfed, wingless Mels - then wingless, then gliders) soon after. This technique has worked well for me - but I know there are those that swear by leaving them in.
 

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Bromeliad leaves, film canisters, or other smooth surfaces. Females seem to prefer to lay between overlapping leaves.
This part also needs a little rewording.

Eggs will be layed on Bromeliad leaves, film canisters, or other smooth surfaces.

or

Bromeliad leaves, film canisters, or other smooth surfaces are commonly utilized for egg deposition. Females often prefer to lay between overlapping leaves.

Also - we need to link to or quote the information from Robb about Calcium Gluconate supplementation in the care sheet so people will have easy access to the info.
 

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Automated misting has also been recommended by many as a requirement for breeding success. This helps flush the tadpole sites and keep them full. In addition to the misting pumilo, they can benefit from more ventilation than others due to the increased misting. Successful misting times may very anywhere from 3 times a day up to 5 times a day, and from 1-5 minutes each time.
I think this should also be reworded a bit - as while automated misting is great - the same effect can be achieved by increased hand misting - and that it is the increased misting, not necessarily the automated misting that promotes breeding. It is also important to note to those not using automated misters the importance of flushing the broms with water (I do it 1-2x weekly) to promote healthy tadpoles.
 

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I think we should put a brief paragraph on pulling froglets soon after morping, versus letting them remain in an established tank to feed off of the microfauna for a few weeks/months, and then pulling them.

Personally, I yank the froglets after they have made their way out of the broms and immediately transfer them to individual froglet containers seeded with springtails, and then begin feeding FFs (first dwarfed, wingless Mels - then wingless, then gliders) soon after. This technique has worked well for me - but I know there are those that swear by leaving them in.
I second that.
 

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Froglet care is the trickiest part about D. pumilio care, and also the most highly debated. Froglet care initially hinges on the keepers' decision to leave the froglet in the tank with its parents, or to remove it as soon as it is discovered. The decision varies with keepers' preference, experience level, tank setup and condition, and the specific D. pumilio morph being worked with.

Typically froglets are pulled with the hardiest morphs (Bastimentos, Man Creek, etc) usually kept in smaller tanks, when the froglets move out of the container they morphed in and begin to actively hunt. The hardier morphs tend to have more robust froglets that can handle the stress of capture and a new environment better, as well as take larger food items sooner. Smaller tanks tend to not have as good a population of micro fauna as in larger tanks, and this is further depleted if there are other froglets already in the tank as well.

Froglets are moved to small containers (gladware, kritter keepers, 2.5 gallons or smaller) and provided leaf litter for cover and kept individually. It is best if these containers already have a strong springtail population going already, and springtails should be added regularly to keep a constant supply. Stunted melanogaster FFs, preferably of the wingless or golden delicious varieties, as well as other tiny feeders such as freshly born aphids should also be offered. As the frog grows, it can be offered more FFs and offered other small food items.

Froglets typically left in tank are the more difficult morphs (darklands, robalo, etc), kept in larger tanks, and are froglets that would die from the stress of capture and relocation. The tanks in which these froglets are found should have plenty of leaf litter in which the froglets can hide and hunt, and the springtail population of the vivarium should be kept as high by adding additional springtails on at least a weekly basis when froglets are seen. Additional small foods like stunted melanogaster, wingless or golden declicious, and fresh born aphids should also be added on a regular basis. The longer the tank has been set up, the better the micro fauna of the tank will be, and the better success of the froglets. When set up and cared for correctly, these tanks can support a number of froglets as well as a colony of adults. Froglets should be pulled when half to 2/3 the size of adults, as they are nearing sexual maturity and that is the point in which the parents may be a danger to the offspring.

Other than that... even with misting systems I suggest flushing the water holders (broms or otherwise) 1-4x weekly by hand. Misting systems just don't flush the water as much as I'd like, and I've had water quality problems in the past when leaving the mister to do all the work.
 

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Ok added and made a couple of minor wording changes... Please review as with this new info I think it is ready for release.

I also added threads about Calcium Gluconate under the froglet section...
 

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Also an interesting note... the red in pumilio seems to be very diet dependent, and reds (BJs, likely Man creeks, red bastis, bri bri, etc) should be supplemented to get the color closest to wild. I'm currently writing up an article about this that sums up a number of the threads we've had going about this, and it would likely be a good link when I'm done. An along that line and the raising froglets with parents or outside the tank....

"As an aside, I mentioned earlier that pumilio reared in the large viv with the parents seem to color up better. I just moved a subadult out of the large viv and placed her with an older sibling. Wow! it is shocking how brightly colored the younger frog is. She looks just like a wc while the older sibs reared in smaller vivs are decidedly orange. " bbrock from this thread

Edit: found a link to Brent's page on this topic... can be found here.

Something to think about.
 
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