Dendroboard banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Dendrobates Galactonotus:

  • Difficulty: Intermediate - due to being difficult to breed.
    [/*:m:9z7dejk5]
  • Location & History:
    Found in lowland rainforest parts of Brazil south of the Amazon river. These frogs are relatively new to the hobby. They first came in in the late 1990's but they were discovered by Steindachner in 1864. (1)
    [/*:m:9z7dejk5]
  • Descriptions & Behavior:
    They are about 30-40mm big (2), usually having black legs with a "splashed" backs hence their common name "The Splashback Poison Dart Frog". The color of their backs can range from yellow to red. They are fairly shy but if you put them in a bigger tank with heavier planting and you will probably see them out in the open more often.

    Note: These morphs represent unique subpopulations in the wild that share general physical characteristics, and for that reason different morphs should not be mixed.

    Note from KeroKero - There is a lot of confusion over morphs, and part of it has to do with inconsistent use of names (ex= golden vs. solid orange), confusion over what names mean (ex= a '95% orange' galac can have more or less than 95% of its body covered with orange, but the percentage should not be changed to reflect that as the name is not that literal, and a 95% orange is not a 75% orange bred to have more color, they are different populations, percentage was just a label to differentiate between the two), and using generalized names that cover more than one morph (such as the various orange morphs). This guide includes information gathered from a number of resources including long time keepers that know the respective history of morphs they are working with, and includes all definite morphs of Galacs known (at least by this author) that may be present in the hobby at this time.

    'Lemon Yellow': Very similar in markings to the 'Orange' form, the coloration is instead a bright, flat yellow that does not extend to the hind limbs as regularly as it does in the 'Orange' form. A relative late comer to the US hobby, even more recently a second "bloodline"/possible morph has been imported, called the "German Line". It is currently unknown if these are from a separate locality, and they are kept separate for this reason. More information can be found on the Pumilio.com D. galactonotus 'Lemon Yellow' morph profile.

    '95% Orange': (aka '90% Orange', 'Yellow-Orange', '95% Yellow-Orange', 'Para') Probably the most confusing of the morphs, due to pattern, color variation, and history. This morph has a broad range in color, from a pale yellow-orange to a brighter red-orange (5), and the color covers much more of the body than in the 'Orange' morph, as much as to leave only the upper chest and throat with significant amounts of black markings (6). In contrast to the 'Orange' form, these animals do have marking on the forelimbs, and more on the sides, and generally paler in coloration than the 'Orange (75%)' form, yet with less orange pattern than the 'Solid Orange' form. The original "yellow" D. galactonotus in the hobby, they can be distinguished from the 'Lemon Yellow' Galacs by coloration, the '95% Orange' being more of a cantalope flesh color (5) vs. the 'Lemon Yellow' bold, flat yellow coloration. *** Please note that, as mentioned on their site, the 'Orange' galacs produced by Suarian Enterprises, Inc. are actually this morph, rather than the '75% Orange' which typically goes by the title 'Orange' in the rest of the hobby.

    'Orange': (aka '75% Orange') These animals show pumpkin orange coloration on their back that in most animals continues onto splashes on the hind legs, but not usually on the forelimbs. One of the boldest and easiest to breed forms of the species currently in the US hobby. More information can be found on the Pumilio.com D. galactonotus '75% Orange' morph profile. *** Please note that, as mentioned on their site, the 'Orange' galacs produced by Suarian Enterprises, Inc. are actually the '95% Orange' morph, rather than than this morph, which typically goes by the title 'Orange' in the rest of the hobby.

    'Solid Orange': (aka 'Golden') Much like the name implies, these animals are just about completely orange, except for small black markings their toes, joints, around the tympanum, mouth, and on the underside. At first glance may be mistaken for P. terribilis 'Orange', but P. terribilis 'Orange' lacks most the the before mentioned black markings, and where black markings are present, tend to have a more gradual change from orange to black (like the colors are smudged) where in D. galactonotus the change from orange to black is generally clean. A larger form of this species, their coloration can vary from a pale yellow-orange to a bright pumpkin orange (5). More information can be found on the Pumilio.com D. galactonotus 'Solid Orange' profile

    'Red': "The red variety varies from a deep wine to an orange red color within clutch mates." (6) This form can be trickier to breed, and tends to be a bit shier than other forms of this species(1).

    'Moonshine': Another solid colored Galac, and another recent addition to the US hobby. Again, another morph that can be confused at first glance with a P. terribilis morph, this time the 'Mint' form of the species. While some animals were imported a few years ago, it is unknown if there is actually a successful breeding population.

    'Wedge': These animals have been labeled "red" or "orange", but they seem to actually be in between, so a color label isn't all that accurate, although the pattern name is. These animals have a "wedge" pattern of red/orange on their back, covering the head and narrowing down the back. Very little, if any markings are present on the hind legs or sides. One of, if not the smallest form in the hobby (1). This animal has not been seen in the hobby for a number of years, and its unknown if its still present.

    'Koi': This form is extremely variable in that it can have orange spots, yellow lines, or whites spots (3). It is unknown if these are actually a wild population of animals, or a genetic anomaly in the captive population, so these animals are probably a bloodline rather than a true morph, but it is unknown to which population (and if its even a population present in the US hobby) they are from if this is true.
    [/*:m:9z7dejk5]
  • General Care:
    Care is similar to D. Tinctorius, but they like it about 70F to 80F, a tad warmer than other Dendrobatids like it. They are ground dwelling frogs but will climb if given the vertical space. When D. galactonotus are stressed they tend to climb high to feel safe. This species can be very aggresive towards other species so please no mixing. They inhabit all different levels of the vivarium.
    [/*:m:9z7dejk5]
  • Breeding & tadpole Care:
    D. galactonotus is difficult to sex, and are best sexed by body shape. A heavily fed frog (aka overweight) does not accurately show body shape... males and females will look alike. This species shows very little sexual dimorphism, similar to its closest relatives (D. quinq and D. casti).
    Here is their call http://www.mistking.com/calls/D_galactonotus.mp3 . They lay eggs that look infertile (white) at first but will develope later on. Lays about 5-10 eggs hatching in 10-14 days. They breed better in groups and with multiple laying sites. Care of tads and eggs is the same as D. Tinctorius.
    [/*:m:9z7dejk5]
  • Pictures:
    D. galactonotus 'Orange':



    D. galactonotus 'Solid Orange':

    D. galactonotus 'Red':
    [/*:m:9z7dejk5]
References:
(1) Saurian Enterprises, Inc. Galac Morphs
(2) Poison-frogs.com D. galactonotus species profile
(3) Herpetologic
(4) http://www.mistking.com/calls/
(5) Pumilio.com Frog of the Month Archives
(6) Vivarium Concepts Galac Profile

Contributers:
costaricalvr12
Dendro Dave
Kyle Kopp (kyle1745)
Corey Wickliffe (KeroKero)

If you would like to see any updates or modifications to this care sheet please let myself or a moderator know.

Last Updated: 12/29/2006
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,734 Posts
Edit your post and remove the
Code:
tags and it'll display fine. Those tags are for showing people the code, not rendering it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Well I got it edited and I need more info for the "Care" and "Breeding" subtitles. I need someone who has Galac's (and knowledge) to chime in and give me info b/c I don't have galac's :( .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Dendrobates Galactonotous:
  • Difficulty: Novice
    [/*:m:bw4kukyk]
  • Location & History: Found in some lowland rainforest parts of Brazil south of the Amazon river. These frogs are relatively new to the hobby. They first came in in the late 1990's. They were discovered by Steindachner in 1864.
    [/*:m:bw4kukyk]
  • Descriptions & Behavior: They are about 30-40mm big, usually having black legs with a "splashed" backs hence their common "The Splashback Poison Dart Frog". The color of their backs can range from yellow to red. They are fairly shy but if you put them in a bigger tank with heavier planting and you will probably see them out in the open more often.

    Note: These morphs represent unique subpopulations in the wild that share general physical characterisitics, and for that reason different morphs should not be mixed.


    D. galactonotus 'Red': This a classic form that has a dark red back and black legs. This form is a reluctant breeder but when it starts breeding it is "explosive" as Patrick says. Also this is the shyest form of galactonotus.

    D. galactonotus 'Yellow': This form of galactonotus has a lemon yellow back, rarely does the yellow extend to the legs. The yellow can range from intense to pale and can be quite variable. This form is one of the more uncommon forms.

    D. galactonotus 'Orange': This form is a variable form that can be called 70% orange or 90% orange, this is judged by how much orange is on the frog. The 90% form is almost solid orange on the back, showing little black on the legs. The 70% form has the same amount of orange as the Yellow Galactonotus has yellow. D. galactonotus 'Orange' is the easiest to breed and also is the boldest yet not as bold as the tinctorius or azureus. It also does the best in groups.
    [/*:m:bw4kukyk]
  • General Care: Care is similar to D. Tinctorius, but they like it about 77F to 80F. They are ground dwelling frogs but will climb if given the vertical space.
    [/*:m:bw4kukyk]
  • Breeding & tadpole Care: They lay eggs that look infertile (white) at first but will develope later on. They breed better in groups. Care of tads and eggs is the same as D. Tinctorius.
    [/*:m:bw4kukyk]
  • Pictures: Didn't have time but will get some pics later.
    [/*:m:bw4kukyk]
References:
http://saurian.net/
http://www.poison-frogs.com/

Contributers:
costaricalvr12
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Found a thread from dendro dave so here it is even more updated, it's getting closer and closer to getting finished. :D

Dendrobates Galactonotous:
  • Difficulty: Novice
    [/*:m:1i1z6cdv]
  • Location & History: Found in lowland rainforest parts of Brazil south of the Amazon river. These frogs are relatively new to the hobby. They first came in in the late 1990's but they were discovered by Steindachner in 1864.
    [/*:m:1i1z6cdv]
  • Descriptions & Behavior: They are about 30-40mm big, usually having black legs with a "splashed" backs hence their common name "The Splashback Poison Dart Frog". The color of their backs can range from yellow to red. When D. galactonotus are stressed they will climb high to feel safe. They are fairly shy but if you put them in a bigger tank with heavier planting and you will probably see them out in the open more often.

    Note: These morphs represent unique subpopulations in the wild that share general physical characterisitics, and for that reason different morphs should not be mixed.


    D. galactonotus 'Red': This is a classic form that has a dark red back and black legs. This form is a reluctant breeder but when it starts breeding it is "explosive" as Patrick (Saurian.net) says. This also is the shyest form of galactonotus.

    D. galactonotus 'Yellow': This form of galactonotus has a lemon yellow back, rarely does the yellow extend to the legs. The yellow can range from intense to pale and can be quite variable with jagged edges to smooth edges. This form is one of the more uncommon forms.

    D. galactonotus 'Orange': This form is a variable form that can be called 70% orange or 90% orange, this depends how much orange is on the frog. The 90% form is almost solid orange on the back, showing little black on the back legs and a little orange on the front legs. The 70% form has the same amount of orange as the Yellow Galactonotus has yellow. D. galactonotus 'Orange' is the easiest to breed and also is the boldest yet not as bold as the tinctorius or azureus. It also does the best in groups.
    [/*:m:1i1z6cdv]
  • General Care: Care is similar to D. Tinctorius, but they like it about 77F to 80F. They are ground dwelling frogs but will climb if given the vertical space.
    [/*:m:1i1z6cdv]
  • Breeding & tadpole Care: They lay eggs that look infertile (white) at first but will develope later on. They breed better in groups. Care of tads and eggs is the same as D. Tinctorius.
    [/*:m:1i1z6cdv]
  • Pictures: Waiting for permission to use pics from Saurian.net[/*:m:1i1z6cdv]
References:
http://saurian.net/
http://www.poison-frogs.com/

Contributers:
costaricalvr12
Dendro Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I need pictures of galactonotus for this care sheet. I will get some pics from Patrick (with permission), but the more the better. Here's what I need:

D. Galactonotus '90% Orange'

D. Galactonotus '70% Orange'

D. Galactonotus 'Red'

D. Galactonotus 'Yellow'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,279 Posts
lalala

The temps listed are toward the upper range....should probably be a little wider range from low to mid 70's to about 80 would be better.

Not much i can think to add from my personal experience. Galacts can be very aggressive towards other species. Also when stressed/scared i've noticed mine tend to climb. They inhabit all levels of the viv also. Difficult to sex.

Also i dont think Moonshine Galact was listed as a morph (the white ones)
also Koi wasnt mentioned, (see sean stewarts site)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Dendrobates Galactonotus:

  • Difficulty: Novice
    [/*:m:3opccbsm]
  • Location & History: Found in lowland rainforest parts of Brazil south of the Amazon river. These frogs are relatively new to the hobby. They first came in in the late 1990's but they were discovered by Steindachner in 1864.
    [/*:m:3opccbsm]
  • Descriptions & Behavior: They are about 30-40mm big, usually having black legs with a "splashed" backs hence their common name "The Splashback Poison Dart Frog". The color of their backs can range from yellow to red. They are fairly shy but if you put them in a bigger tank with heavier planting and you will probably see them out in the open more often.

    Note: These morphs represent unique subpopulations in the wild that share general physical characterisitics, and for that reason different morphs should not be mixed.


    D. galactonotus 'Red': This is a classic form that has a dark red back and black legs. This form is a reluctant breeder but when it starts breeding it is "explosive" as Patrick (Saurian.net) says. This also is the shyest form of galactonotus.

    D. galactonotus 'Yellow': This form of galactonotus has a lemon yellow back, rarely does the yellow extend to the legs. The yellow can range from intense to pale and can be quite variable with jagged edges to smooth edges. This form is one of the more uncommon forms.

    D. galactonotus 'Orange': This form is a variable form that can be called 70% orange or 90% orange, this depends how much orange is on the frog. The 90% form is almost solid orange on the back, showing little black on the back legs and a little orange on the front legs. The 70% form has the same amount of orange as the Yellow Galactonotus has yellow. D. galactonotus 'Orange' is the easiest to breed and also is the boldest yet not as bold as the tinctorius or azureus. It also does the best in groups.

    D. galactonotus 'Golden': This form is solid gold (its actually more yellow). Sometimes called 100% gold. This form is probably the most like the red or orange forms. *This form might not be pure*

    D. galactonotus 'Koi': This form is extremely variable it can have orange spots, yellow lines, or whites spots. The only thing the same on this frog is that it always is black (black legs and black back) except for the spots/lines.

    D. galactonotus 'Moonshine': This form can easily be confused with the 'Mint' form of D. Terriblis as this form is solid (100%) white, but not bright white. This form is probably similar to the golden form, not much is known about this frog. *I am not sure if this form is availible in the USA*
    [/*:m:3opccbsm]
  • General Care: Care is similar to D. Tinctorius, but they like it about 73F to 80F, a tad warmer than other Dendrobatids like it. They are ground dwelling frogs but will climb if given the vertical space. When D. galactonotus are stressed they tend to climb high to feel safe. This species can be very aggresive towards other species so please no mixing. They inhabit all different levels of the vivarium.
    [/*:m:3opccbsm]
  • Breeding & tadpole Care: D. galactonotus is difficult to sex. Here is their call http://www.mistking.com/calls/D_galactonotus.mp3 . They lay eggs that look infertile (white) at first but will develope later on. Lays about 5-10 eggs hatching in 10-14 days. They breed better in groups and with multiple laying sites. Care of tads and eggs is the same as D. Tinctorius.
    [/*:m:3opccbsm]
  • Pictures: Waiting for permission to use pics from Saurian.net[/*:m:3opccbsm]
References:
http://saurian.net/
http://www.poison-frogs.com/
http://www.herpetologic.com/
http://www.crystalpalacereptiles.com/ca ... onotus.htm

Contributers:
costaricalvr12
Dendro Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,997 Posts
there are at least 2 red morphs the orange wedge, orange 70% 90% and 100%, there are also at least 3 yellow morphs.
the galacts are the worst of all morphwise since almost all of them were smuggled and have no info and look VERY similar. most have already been crossed. i brought in a red morph different then the ones i have and patrick has and i brought in 2 yellow morphs seperate from the one already in country with the broken yellow back. they are the deeper yellow morphs and i was told they were from different areas, one was a little smaller and had more black on the legs. all this info has been pretty much lost.
there was also a blue morph smuggled in for one person, only 6 came in and they all died in his hands but there possibly could be more in country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,684 Posts
The morph information on this frog is rather unclear, and is a huge debate I've been having with a number of long time keepers... I've been trying to clear this up but there is also the problem that some of these animals are not really in the hobby anymore that I can tell (wedge, etc) so its confusing.

Red (75%), Orange (75%), Lemon Yellow (75% and also the German Line which may or many not be another population), Orange-Yellow (the original yellows before the lemon yellows came on the scene), 95% Orange, Solid Orange (same as golden I believe), Orange Wedge are all morphs I know are true breeding. I don't believe the Moonshine animals have been bred in the US. Koi I believe is a genetic variation of another morph (look at the "koi" orange terribilis... similar crazy pattern but a genetic phenomenon, not a population). There is some debate over having more than one variation of red in the hobby, but it seems that it is more the case that there is variation in the intensity of the reds in the hobby.

Name wise, I'd follow what is listed above, and list names like "golden" as synonyms for the morph... Sean does a lot of great work but tends to make up his own names for stuff instead of following the names already established in the hobby.

I'm still recovering from thanksgiving and will put in my 2 cents on this caresheet a little later on.

A lot of the problem comes from us importing these animals from Europe and we do not know if these animals are wild types, were bred to have certain coloration, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
986 Posts
Looks good to me. I would probably lower the low end on the temperature even more. I know everyone says that darts should be kept in the mid 70's, but my tanks regularly drop to 65 degrees F each night during the winter. They might reach 75 during the day with the lights on. I think we should at least be consistent with the Tinc care sheet and list the temp accordingly.

Further, my red galacs, and the moonshines that I have seen, are both larger than the 40 mm (1.5 inches) listed here as size. I would agree that they can be difficult to sex, but there are some body type signs to go by: generally larger, more rotund, etc. However, they are definitely more tricky than azureus and cobalt tincs.

Finally, some have reported that the eggs may be more light sensitive than other darts, and this may contribute to eggs going bad.

I'll let everyone else fight over the morphs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,684 Posts
Difficulties in sexing also has to do with weight issues in many frogs... galacs are best sexed by body shape, and a heavily fed frog (aka overweight) does not accurately show body shape... males and females will look alike. This species shows very little sexual dimorphism, similar to its closest relatives (D. quinq and D. casti).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,684 Posts

Orange


Orange

I have a bunch of other pics, but they are on my old computer. They include lemon yellow and I believe i've got one or two other morphs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,684 Posts
Some other really good information on morphs (as well as excellent photos to help sort out some labling confusion) can be found in the pumilio.com frog of the month archives, of which three galactonotus morphs are featured, and they go into detail on how they relate to other morphs as well.

Dendrobates galactonotus 'Lemon Yellow'
Dendrobates galactonotus 'Solid Orange'
Dendrobates galactonotus (75% Orange)

With this information it basically breaks down into these morphs:

~ 'Red': "The red variety varies from a deep wine to an orange red color within clutch mates." (Vivarium Concepts Galac Profile)
~ 'Orange': (aka 75% orange) "The 75% orange (or splashback) form has uniform pumpkin orange coloration splashed down their backs and legs." (Vivarium Concepts) - These animals show pumpkin orange coloration on their back that in most animals continues onto splashes on the hind legs, but not usually on the forelimbs.
~ 'Lemon Yellow': Very similar in markings to the 'Orange' form, the coloration is instead a bright, flat yellow. A relative late comer to the US hobby, even more recently a second "bloodline"/possible morph has been imported, called the "German Line". It is currently unknown if these are from a separate locality, and they are kept separate for this reason.
~ '95% Orange' - Probably the most confusing of the morphs, also known as the 'yellow-orange', or 'Para'. This morph has a broad range in color, from a pale yellow-orange to a brighter red-orange (pumilio.com), these animals have more orange coloration on the body ("The 95% orange form is most often a more creamy orange color that covers most all of the frog’s body except upper chest and throat." Vivarium concepts). These animals do have marking on the forelimbs, and more on the sides, and generally paler in coloration than the 'Orange (75%)' form, and less orange coloration than the 'Solid Orange'. The original "yellow" galactonotus in the hobby, they can be distinguished from the 'Lemon Yellow' Galacs by coloration, the '95% Orange' being more of a cantalope flesh color (pumilio.com) vs. the 'Lemon Yellow' bold, flat yellow coloration.
~ 'Solid Orange': Much like the name implies, these animals are just about completely orange, except for their toes, and at first glance may be mistaken for P. terribilis 'Orange'. A larger form of this species, their coloration can vary from a pale yellow-orange to a bright pumpkin orange (pumilio.com).
~ 'Moonshine': Another solid colored galac, and another recent addition to the US hobby. Again, another morph that can be confused at first glance with a P. terribilis morph, this time the 'Mint' form of the species. While some animals were imported a couple years ago, it is unknown if there is actually a successful breeding population.
~ 'Wedge': These animals have been labled "red" or "orange", but they seem to actually be in between, so a color lable isn't all that accurate, although the pattern name is. These animals have a "wedge" pattern of red/orange on their back, covering the head and narrowing down the back. Very little, if any markings are present on the hind legs or sides. One of, if not the smallest form in the hobby. This animal has not been seen in the hobby for a number of years, and its unknown if its still present.

~ "Koi": It is unknown if these are actually a wild population of animals, or a genetic anomaly in the captive population, so these animals are considered a bloodline rather than a true morph.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
hmmmm... I don't know how to add pics so can you add them for me.
Heres the code:
Code:
[size=18][b]Dendrobates Galactonotus:[/b][/size] 

[list][*][b]Difficulty:[/b] Novice 

[*][b]Location & History:[/b] Found in lowland rainforest parts of Brazil south of the Amazon river. These frogs are relatively new to the hobby. They first came in in the late 1990's but they were discovered by Steindachner in 1864. 

[*][b]Descriptions & Behavior:[/b] They are about 30-40mm big, usually having black legs with a "splashed" backs hence their common name "The Splashback Poison Dart Frog". The color of their backs can range from yellow to red. They are fairly shy but if you put them in a bigger tank with heavier planting and you will probably see them out in the open more often. 

[color=red]Note: These morphs represent unique subpopulations in the wild that share general physical characterisitics, and for that reason different morphs should not be mixed. 
[/color] 

[b]D. galactonotus 'Red':[/b] This is a classic form that has a dark red back and black legs. This form is a reluctant breeder but when it starts breeding it is "explosive" as Patrick (Saurian.net) says. This also is the shyest form of galactonotus. 

[b]D. galactonotus 'Yellow':[/b] This form of galactonotus has a lemon yellow back, rarely does the yellow extend to the legs. The yellow can range from intense to pale and can be quite variable with jagged edges to smooth edges. This form is one of the more uncommon forms. 

[b]D. galactonotus 'Orange':[/b] This form is a variable form that can be called 70% orange or 90% orange, this depends how much orange is on the frog. The 90% form is almost solid orange on the back, showing little black on the back legs and a little orange on the front legs. The 70% form has the same amount of orange as the Yellow Galactonotus has yellow. D. galactonotus 'Orange' is the easiest to breed and also is the boldest yet not as bold as the tinctorius or azureus. It also does the best in groups.

[b]D. galactonotus 'Golden':[/b] This form is solid gold (its actually more yellow). Sometimes called 100% gold. This form is probably the most like the red or orange forms. *This form [b]might[/b] not be pure*

[b]D. galactonotus 'Koi':[/b] This form is extremely variable it can have orange spots, yellow lines, or whites spots. The only thing the same on this frog is that it always is black (black legs and black back) except for the spots/lines.

[b]D. galactonotus 'Moonshine':[/b] This form can easily be confused with the 'Mint' form of D. Terriblis as this form is solid (100%) white, but not bright white. This form is probably similar to the golden form, not much is known about this frog. *I am not sure if this form is availible in the USA*

[*][b]General Care:[/b] Care is similar to D. Tinctorius, but they like it about 73F to 80F, a tad warmer than other Dendrobatids like it. They are ground dwelling frogs but will climb if given the vertical space.  When D. galactonotus are stressed they tend to climb high to feel safe. This species can be very aggresive towards other species so please no mixing. They inhabit all different levels of the vivarium.

[*][b]Breeding & tadpole Care:[/b] D. galactonotus is difficult to sex. Here is their call [url]http://www.mistking.com/calls/D_galactonotus.mp3[/url] . They lay eggs that look infertile (white) at first but will develope later on. Lays about 5-10 eggs hatching in 10-14 days. They breed better in groups and with multiple laying sites. Care of tads and eggs is the same as D. Tinctorius. 

[*][b]Pictures:[/b] Waiting for permission to use pics from Saurian.net
[/list] 
[size=9]References: 
[url]http://saurian.net/[/url] 
[url]http://www.poison-frogs.com/[/url] 
[url]http://www.herpetologic.com/[/url]
[url]http://www.crystalpalacereptiles.com/caresheets/galactonotus.htm[/url]

Contributers: 
costaricalvr12
Dendro Dave 
[/size][color=red][/color][b][/b][b][/b]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,734 Posts
A note on digging/burrowing might be worthwhile since this is a common behavior that's not often seen in other pdfs.

Digging/burrowing:
Galacts, unlike other Dendrobatidae, will sometimes dig and burry themselves underground. Do not be alarmed if they do this, though increasing the humidity and/or planting the tank heavier would be suggestions for providing the conditions to encourage them not to burrow.

Here's how you add images:


Picture contribution, Red Galact.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top