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I have a pair of El Dorados that are breeding machines. Poor female looks like an orange tomato and struggles to drag her fat belly around. I'd like to give them a break, as I've read they should have one, but I'm not sure how to do it.

From what I've read, decrease misting/humidity and decrease feeding. Temps?

Ok, I can do that. However, I have tads in the broms and froglets on the floor. My concern is that the tad water in the broms will dry up without misting and the froglets will perish with decreased feeding, as the adults snarf up the microfauna in the absence of flies.

So, how does one go about this?
 

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I've been wondering the same thing, since my mancreek pumilio have gone through at least 3 consecutive breeding cycles. They both look fine, but I don't want them to burn out for down the road... I figured they would stop but I just found 3 new clutches of eggs, and several are developing nicely. These frogs really seem to lay far more easily and frequently than any of my others, which makes me wonder just how to slow them down, short of removing the male, especially like Frogface said when you have to think about any froglets or tadpoles in the tank that could be affected by changes.
Looking forward to some other responses.
Bryan
 

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your on point with the methods you suggested.

both decreased misting (some tanks can go for LONG periods w/o misting) and decreased feeding is a good initiative to suspend breeding. mating requires copious amounts of nutrients(ive heard as much as 20X the normal consumption for males calling versus resting) if you take excesses of nutrients away the frogs are simply less likley to breed.

the easiest method i could suggest given your circumstance, is to decrease feeding and humidity, and spot fill broms that contain tads. remove offspring immediately upon emergence and place them into a previously seeded grow out.


james
 

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I do a "down cycle" on adult pums at the beginning of every winter (about november), I drop the temps by 2 °C, misting only 1-2x a week (average humidity at about 50%), feeding only 1-2x a week. This takes about 2 weeks for my frogs to calm down. In march I go back up again to breeding settings, my darklands start to call immediately, other morphs might take some more time. Make sure to supplement well during the winter feeding so they don't lack anything.

Some will have to remove the males from the breeding tanks, as some male pums won't stop calling... Also you won't see the frogs as often as they hide more during the dry period.

remove offspring immediately upon emergence and place them into a previously seeded grow out.
make sure you do like James said, froglets need a lot of food to develop.

This dryer period also happens in their natural habitat, google the temps and humidity of the region your frogs come from, that will give you a good indication.

Have a nice day

gluedl
 
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