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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always preferred larger tanks, but have a wall area that I would like to build a rack into. I have a complete wood shop, and experience making acrylic and glass tanks. So no problems there.

I was thinking of using acrylic cubes instead of larger tanks, and the area is perfectly divisable by 15 inches.

I know alot of people use 10 gallons, and a 15 cube is a bit more than 10 gallons. Just seems a bit small to me.

How many of you keep terrestial pairs in 15 inch cubes.
 

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I agree 15x15 is a little small. What about making them 20x15 and putting the longer side perpendicular to the wall. That way you still can have a good fit but a much bigger surface area in the vivs.
 

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Scott,

How deep of a shelf can you accomedate? Is 15 inches the maximal depth you can fit?
Are you planning on hard plumbing the tanks?

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That is a viable option. I'm not set on the 15" either. Can fill in with trim if I went with fewer larger cubes.
Just looking for opinions to come up with a good average size cube that will work with a pair of any species. I have never used small enclosures I like bigger ones, but smaller= more in same space.
 

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I deal primarily in thumbs. A local over here does very well with his large terrestrial frogs in 18" square floor space.... Looking at how little they use anything above maybe 10", though, and looking at how they fit in the 18 floor space I doubt if I'd go much smaller than that....
 

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I've got 2 18" cubes and I'm happy with the size.

Would you consider splitting the size of three cubes down to 2? Like, instead of 45" being divided into 3 15" cubes could you do 2x22" by 15" deep vivs side by side?
 

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I keep most of my tinc pairs in 10 gal tanks. I think as long as you don't have plants take over most of the floor space then 15 are ok. You can also create levels with cork slabs or flat drift wood and that will give additional floor space.
 

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It is only in more recent years that we have seen the move towards bigger enclosures.. and lower densities. Years ago when I was working with assorted tinctorius and auratus, I was breeding them in groups of 3, 4, or 5 in 20 gallon longs.. Most of the zoo breeding set-ups were ten gallon tanks (for example most of the off-exhibit enclosures at NAIB were ten gallons).

As Jeremy, noted, the main thing is to not overcrowd the tank with plants (which is a common issue in my opinion) which lets the frogs have sufficient room to move around.

One of the benefits about larger enclosures is that you may be able to get a sustainable microfauna population going in it..

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've got 2 18" cubes and I'm happy with the size.

Would you consider splitting the size of three cubes down to 2? Like, instead of 45" being divided into 3 15" cubes could you do 2x22" by 15" deep vivs side by side?
I can do whatever I want. I haven't even sketched anything up yet. Just trying to find out a good average size everyone uses for cubes. before I start to doodle. The 15 was just an example. I was looking for posts like I use 16s, and I use 18s, I use 22s, etc.

Then get a good average. Wouldn't need the biggest, or want the smallest. somewhere in the middle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Scott,

How deep of a shelf can you accomedate? Is 15 inches the maximal depth you can fit?
Are you planning on hard plumbing the tanks?

Ed
Well Ed, there is 8 feet of dead space behind the wall. Accessible thru my garage which is heated. I planned on hard plumbing yes. Depth is not an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It is only in more recent years that we have seen the move towards bigger enclosures.. and lower densities. Years ago when I was working with assorted tinctorius and auratus, I was breeding them in groups of 3, 4, or 5 in 20 gallon longs.. Most of the zoo breeding set-ups were ten gallon tanks (for example most of the off-exhibit enclosures at NAIB were ten gallons).

As Jeremy, noted, the main thing is to not overcrowd the tank with plants (which is a common issue in my opinion) which lets the frogs have sufficient room to move around.

One of the benefits about larger enclosures is that you may be able to get a sustainable microfauna population going in it..

Ed
Thanks Ed. Something to think about. Missed both of your posts earlier.
 

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Hi Scott,

While it would cut down on visibility keep in mind since you are custom building the tanks would be that for primarily terrestrial species you can reduce the height even by a couple of inches per tank would allow more tanks per space.

Since you have that much space behind the tanks, I was going to suggest that if you place the lighting fixtures on a slidable sheet of wood you can pull them out (from the front or back), to change bulbs or fixtures. This eliminates having to work in a small amount of space above the tanks. If you hard plumb the tanks you may want to also keep that access in mind as well.. It was just a random thought that occured to me since I've spent a lot of time wishing for better builds while caring for a large herp collection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks Ed. Some good points to think about.

That's what I am up to is thinking of a design for a future build. I would eventually like to have a "collection" of Tinc morphs. I would be fine with a single frog of each morph, but from a husbandry standpoint pairs would be better.
Every month we send 100s and 100s of 2 x 4s to the recycler at work, so I pick out the good ones and stack them up in my garage.

I was thinking of a design, and figured 2 minds are better than one. So, with input from everyone, I should be able to come up with the perfect setup.

Any input is welcome.
 

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I was just thinking about all of the things I hated working large collections on shelves... If you are staying with front opening enclosures then one of the other things to consider is how accessiable the further parts of the tank are from the front. As an example, think of what it would be like to take care of a 20 gallon long only through one of the small ends. This means that there is a limit to the depth any enclosure can be depending on the access.
 

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I take it your pretty sure that this going to be a Long Term project..

If Depth is not a Problem then I would go deeper to get more Floor Space.
Devising a Multi-layer floor can gain you more floor space.

Consider other options along with Misting to keep up Humidity..
An Air Exchanger can be used along with an Ultra-sonic Humidifier.
If you have an old Apartment frig it can be used to chill water for an Air Exchanger which can be used to cool down a Tank also. A few well planned Holes Can be drilled to run lines out into tanks. An Air Pump pumps air into a container with stems for air hoses out to each tank.Dry Air bubbles up through the water out the hoses and into the tank as Wet Air.

Are you wanting to design the Tanks primarily for breeding or for Viewing?
If for breeding you do not need as many Plants as you would removable Artificial breeding containers. Even if you want to let nature decide who survives they can still be used.
Film canisters or shallow dishes can be hidden under Cork tubes or other fake rocks which can be easily removed to check for viable eggs or Tads..While giving the frogs surface area to climb on.
If for Display More space is needed for the Display of Structures and Plants along with the Needs of the Animals.
I have several 24 High Tanks where even that is not enough height due to The Plants.
 
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