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Who thinks this will be beneficial if something good comes out of it???

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Dancing frogs said:
That would be great, I've wanted a pair of blue jeans pumilio since I got into darts. From what I've heard, they breed pretty readily, but are horrible at taking care of their young. This is probably why they are so rare (captive-bred). There has been limited success with trying to feed the tads other food...other dentrobate eggs have even been tried.
If you haven't yet, read this link: (thanks Rob!)
http://www.robbster.com/RobbHome/FrogPa ... p?Tab=Home
I think the setup has a lot to do with blue jeans reproduction. Put them in a large viv with a good misting system, hight quality water, and lots of tad rearing choices and they do fine.

I think an artificial diet is a mixed bag. I use to think it would be great but now I think it would be of limited value. It would be great for quickly getting new morphs established in the hobby but I wouldn't want to see artificial diets used routinely to rear tads other than during the establishment phase because we could end up losing the complex parental care behavior of this wonderful group of frogs. It's nice to have one group of frogs that only reproduce when we set things up right to let them do things their own way.
 

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andersonii85 said:
Brent,

I have a funny story (well to me at least). I have bred blue jeans in a ten gallon tank with no misting system and only one bromeliad. The water was changed once a week at best.
Oh yeah, that's just hilarious. Actually I've heard of other people breeding them in 10's also. No doubt it can be done. I've always felt that going up in size just ups the odds. Of course your freakish frogs would have to break the rules. When people ask what it takes to breed blue jeans, I've often joked that it takes $500 because once youve sunk that much money into a setup, they'll decide it's okay to breed. It's always fun to have frogs that keep us on our toes.
 

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rmelancon said:
There's a lot that is still unknown about these guys and I think if we want to continue to study or even enjoy them in captivity, an alternate food source can only be beneficial.
I don't worry about the experienced and dedicated froggers because they understand what it takes to maintain parental behaviors. For them, having an artificial diet could be a real benefit, especially for establishing lines in the hobby as mentioned before. But the thought of anyone being able to breed pumilio or grans as easily as auratus scares the crap out of me. I can't pretend I haven't dreamt about creating an artificial egg feeding diet myself, but such a powerful tool would require responsible use.
 
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