Dendroboard banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I drilled my first tank today. Applied to much pressure and when the drill finally broke through to the other side the drill came crashing down and cracked the glass. The 2nd tank went well. Can I use the cracked tank or is this just asking for problems. I don't think its sharp enough to cut frog toes and I've never seen frogs climb upsided down on the roof of a tank. Is that $1 a gallon sale still going?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
It is unlikely anything will get cut by it, and if used as the top of the tank, it will probably not leak a significant amount of liquid. The main issue is that the tank will be highly susceptible to future cracking from normal handling, though the rim will help a little bit (or possibly apply more pressure there and make it worse, one never knows). If possibly having to disassemble your entire tank and move it to another one is not a problem, you can use it, but that looks like a pretty inexpensive tank, so I'd probably just be safe and use something else. When drilling you pretty much don't need to use more than the weight of the drill to get through. We use a drill press and I'm not doing much more than breathing on the handle to get it through (though we drill half way through one side, then swap and meet the first hole from the other side; you get perfectly smooth rims on both sides that way). Might be best to just chalk it up as a learning experience rather than risk having to do a new build if the crack expands (and it probably will). The presence of a misting head right where the crack is could also increase failure potential if it ever gets bumped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yeah it's just the old aqueon $1 per gallon sale tank. Not expensive in the least. Man wish I was precise enough to switch sides like that. How fast do you usual let the drill go? I was going at very slow rpms and noticed at the end there was a little broken not drilled chunk out of the hole. I'm guessing caused by low rpms. Are you drilling the tank or the tops to tanks? Seems like a drill press would be hard to use for drilling a vert.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
How low were you going? I usually stay around 1500. Pressure is probably more the cause. I cracked a bunch of glass just because I started putting pressure on the drill.

If you're not worried about it cracking more later, I'd add some silicone to that crack and around the hole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Mine looks very similar to this. My 10 vert.. on top is cracked all the way across. No issues at all. My highland G&B froglets are quite happy in it until they get a little bigger and get their bigger home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,656 Posts
You can always remove the trim cut the cracked panel out and replace it with a new one. Before silicone in the new panel drill it first this way you won't have to remove another broken one if it happened again.....Something to think about if you didn't want to go and get another tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,415 Posts
Yeah it's just the old aqueon $1 per gallon sale tank. Not expensive in the least. Man wish I was precise enough to switch sides like that. How fast do you usual let the drill go? I was going at very slow rpms and noticed at the end there was a little broken not drilled chunk out of the hole. I'm guessing caused by low rpms. Are you drilling the tank or the tops to tanks? Seems like a drill press would be hard to use for drilling a vert.
I've experimented with different speeds. Low speed works, High speed works faster, maybe better. Low speed makes your bit last longer if you are doing a lot of holes. Don't ever forget coolant/lubricant. Never use pressure! Nice and slow, let the bit do the work. http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/parts-construction/58594-how-drill-your-glass.html
 
  • Like
Reactions: CVB

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the input guys. Frog Face I think you hit the nail on the head it'll be a siliconed grow out tank till I can trust it. That $1 per gallon sale ended today at my local shops so I'm done buying tanks for a while. I drilled 3 tanks today each one got a little bit easier with the 1st being the only broken one. I'm going to look into finding one of those "drill guides" kinda like a drill press but not near as fancy. The wood method looks promising as well. Definitely zero pressure when your drilling. I had a hard time getting them started as the whole saw skipped all over and scratched up the tank but other than that it wasn't to bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
In talking to folks from a commercial glass shop in town, we found that glass drilling is smoother and bit life is nearly eternal if you drill using automotive antifreeze as your lubricant. Create a dam using putty around the drilling area, fill with antifreeze, drill as you see fit. Before I started using a drill press, I hand drilled using a very large dam and a suction cup equipped plastic drill guide. Worked well for the 3" holes I was drilling (high volume aquarium drain). We use a drill press now because we drill the glass prior to assembling the tanks, a perk of being a vivarium building company. On the press we run at fairly high speed, though I can't say I've checked the exact RPM, and it takes about 10-15 seconds per side (30 seconds total of drilling at most) to drill a 1/2" or 5/8" hole (Mist King sizes). We get no chipping or glass punchout at that pace.

To do the double sided drilling, I mark the center on one side, line it up, drill half way, then line up the back by eye after I flip it. Never had a problem so long as I take my time. Pretty much how any glass work goes; slow and careful produces quality. Pumilo's link is pretty much exactly what we do every time, can't beat it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,415 Posts
Drilling freehand is quite simple too. You just have to start it at an angle to prevent that skipping around. It's in my thread.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top