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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a couple of questions that I need help with if anyone has the time.
1) The vivarium will be covered with plexy and will be almost airtight, if the viv will be heavily planted(and it will) would the plants provide nuff oxygen for my frogs?
I guess they will but I'd still like to hear some answers from vets.
2) Over the plexy cover I will use an aquarium lid for the lights, now I will use 2 fans to pull air out from betwen the plexy cover and the lid to get the heat from the lights out but I am unsure if I will manage to keep the inside of the vivarium at under 28 celsius. Does anyone have any ideas about cooling a vivarium? I'd use an aquarium water cooler but they are expensive as hell and they dont really do that great of a job.
3) Is there any safe fert that I could use to keep both plants and frogs happy?
I know a lot about ferts and aquariums and what is safe and not safe for fish and other aquatic creatures but that counts for not to much as frogs are not fish.
Thank you.
 

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First, I'd consider using glass over plexi. Chances are the plexi will warp due to the humidity within the tank.

As far as creating an air tight tank, I'd avoid this as well. Even if there's enough oxygen, you're going to have a tank with no air circulation. This could be detrimental to both the plants and frogs. You need some sort of vent to allow fresh air in.

Avoid fertilizers, there's no need. And regarding heat, you may need to run a trial to see exactly how warm the temperatures are getting before taking steps to cool it down. Small fans may be plenty of circulation if you only need to bring it down a couple degrees.

Pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well I could use glass not plexy tho I have a lot of 6mm plexy sheets just waiting to be used.
I am pretty sure the heat will rise to around 30-32 in summer inside the viv, temp here can get as high as 35 celsius in the shade. Unfortunetly air conditioning is out of the question as my wife cant stand it, allergies and stuff.
So I was thinking it's better to be prepared for high temps than to just get the frogs and then start posting "got frogs, temp is to high, now what?" :)
What kind of ventilation would you sugest? Fans? Holes in the lid?
 

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just want to point out that althought plants use CO2 and generate Oxygen during the day....

they use Oxygen to respire and at night, where there is no light, they are using it and not generating any.
 

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I'll give a second recommendation to avoid acrylic, it'll warp and then you'll be mad you wasted a piece of acrylic that lasted only a couple of weeks.

Just leaving a small fraction of the screen top (assuming that there's a screen top) uncovered will give a decent amount of gas exchange without decreasing humidity much.

I've seen a couple threads about ferts in the plants forum, might try a search but I don't think many people use them.

I don't have any good ideas on cooling unfortunately.
 

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So I was thinking it's better to be prepared for high temps than to just get the frogs and then start posting "got frogs, temp is to high, now what?" :)
What kind of ventilation would you sugest? Fans? Holes in the lid?
Right, but you should have the viv set up before you get your frogs, so there would be time to tinker. If you're getting to 32 degrees inside the viv, then yes, you'd need some sort of cooldown. You may get away with just fans across the top, or you may need internal circulation. I don't think you've given specs for the tank, but I'd start out with making sure it's vented with an inch or two of screening (depending on tank size).

Pat
 

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I don't think you've given specs for the tank, but I'd start out with making sure it's vented with an inch or two of screening (depending on tank size).
Small vents at the top of the enclosure may not be sufficient to prevent CO2 from building up and displacing oxygen at the bottom of the tank. Every so often, we see anecdotal reports that have similar symptoms as CO2 poisoning.

Ed
 

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Small vents at the top of the enclosure may not be sufficient to prevent CO2 from building up and displacing oxygen at the bottom of the tank. Every so often, we see anecdotal reports that have similar symptoms as CO2 poisoning.

Ed
Is this one of the justifications for the lower euro style vent in conjunction with an upper vent?
 

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Is this one of the justifications for the lower euro style vent in conjunction with an upper vent?
I'm not sure that it "justifies" it but it prevents CO2 from pooling in the bottom of an enclosure. The venting also keeps the humidity down slightly which actually protects the frogs from overheating since it enables them to engage in evaporative cooling (and the enclosure can also cool via evaporative cooling).
Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok, I understand, I'll make sure there is nuff ventilation in the vivarium.
Tank size is 90-92G (350L).
Thanks so much for the answers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Can I use eco varnish instead of epoxy on the background/fake rocks/etc?
Having a hard time finding epoxy yet eco varnish seems to be in every store I visit...
 

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I wouldn't but I don't know much about the product. I'd say the chances of finding a two part epoxy in a store somewhere is pretty slim unless you go into a large marine supply or you have a composite materials outlet. Most people order the product.

The eco varnish looks like a wood sealing product so I would assume it's not meant to be exposed to very high humidity for any length of time.
 
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