Dendroboard banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm getting ready to setup a 65 gallon aquarium and will be buying some CF ligths (96 watt, I'm thinking of getting it from the Aquarium supply site, that is linked off of Brent's page on frognet). I'm just not sure what "color temp" is best 5,000k? 6,700k? or 10,000k? Any suggestions?

The tank is 3 feet long and about 25 inches high.

-Tad
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
From what i have read, plants and frogs do not do well with a 10k light because there is too much blue in it. They are supposed to be used with a reef aquarium where the light filters through the water before hitting the plants/coral/fish. because of this i have never used them, so i cant say that what i read was true, but :roll:
anyway, i use 7500 on all my plants and tanks and have to trim weekly, so thats good! but using lower color will make plants grow slower, which some people like better for small tanks (less trimming).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,921 Posts
idea said:
From what i have read, plants and frogs do not do well with a 10k light because there is too much blue in it. They are supposed to be used with a reef aquarium where the light filters through the water before hitting the plants/coral/fish. because of this i have never used them, so i cant say that what i read was true, but :roll:
anyway, i use 7500 on all my plants and tanks and have to trim weekly, so thats good! but using lower color will make plants grow slower, which some people like better for small tanks (less trimming).
Actually plants will do just fine under 10000K light but it will look really ugly (the light, not the plants) in a terrestrial viv. Plants use almost all of the visible light for photosynthesis except green which chlorophyl reflects. Photosynthesis is really only interested in the energy of light that chlorophyl can absorb so it really doesn't matter if it is red or blue so long as it can be absorbed by chlorophyl. For the most part, the color temp of the light we use is really just an aesthetic preference. Noon day sun on a cloudless day is about 5000K so something in this range gives a nice white light that looks "natural".

Although I think there is a small relationship between light wavelenght and meristem elongation, light intensity will actually have more effect. High intensity light creates more compact growth while low intensity cause plants to stretch out to reach toward the light.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top