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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!

Wondering if anyone could help me with some information on cohabitation.

- Can two or more different species of Dart Frog live in the same vivarium?
- And what could be the best to house together?

- If not, which species is "easiest" to house in large groups?

- Finally, how about general enclosure set ups? Could a moving water feature be ideal for instance?

Cheers!

:)
 

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Great suggestion, epiphytes! I like the idea of the variability within the morph.

I would add lecuomelas, terribilis, anthonyii and galctonotus to that list. I am sure there are others, too. Those are the ones I have had experience with and remember right now :)

Also, I finally tried a water feature in the my most recent build (my 40th? 50th? build) and I really don't like having it in there. No matter how hard I tried to make it work right and last long-term, I would rather it not be in there. Dart frogs don't (usually) need a water feature. I suggest steering clear of it.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great suggestion, epiphytes! I like the idea of the variability within the morph.

I would add lecuomelas, terribilis, anthonyii and galctonotus to that list. I am sure there are others, too. Those are the ones I have had experience with and remember right now :)

Also, I finally tried a water feature in the my most recent build (my 40th? 50th? build) and I really don't like having it in there. No matter how hard I tried to make it work right and last long-term, I would rather it not be in there. Dart frogs don't (usually) need a water feature. I suggest steering clear of it.

Mark
Fantastic! Thank you
 

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I am a big fan of the El Cope auratus. Two of my three are pretty bold. I just took this pic of one of mine.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Just to elaborate on this question/issue. Does anyone know if different genera of dart frogs can be housed together? The accepted definition of genera is organisms that are genetically distinct from each other that mating or viable resulting offspring cannot occur. Will different genera of dart frogs even attempt to pair and spawn? I'm hoping that someone with specific knowledge on this situation can answer rather than seeking opinions on the subject. Thank you.
 

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The accepted definition of genera is organisms that are genetically distinct from each other that mating or viable resulting offspring cannot occur.
FWIW, that's not quite true. Current cladistic analyses take dates of genetic divergence in lineages as determinant of taxonomic divisions, but that divergence doesn't in itself entail that different taxa aren't reproductively compatible.

Also, hybridization isn't the main consideration in cross-generic cohabitation.

Also, as this is a very contentious issue, expect to get opinions on the subject. Simply searching 'mixing' here may yield the info you're looking for without causing commotion.
 

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I would also say that there's a difference between CAN different species cohabitate and SHOULD we cohabitate different species.

Just because something doesn't lead to the death of the animals doesn't mean it's a good idea.
 

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FWIW, that's not quite true. Current cladistic analyses take dates of genetic divergence in lineages as determinant of taxonomic divisions, but that divergence doesn't in itself entail that different taxa aren't reproductively compatible.

Also, hybridization isn't the main consideration in cross-generic cohabitation.

Also, as this is a very contentious issue, expect to get opinions on the subject. Simply searching 'mixing' here may yield the info you're looking for without causing commotion.
I'm going to go way out on a speculative limb here and say that this is probably not something that you recall from HS AP biology class. But yes, a lot of the old beliefs and definitions are being reassessed, but one must keep in mind that genera aren't necessarily exact taxonomy, but man- given based upon our best guesses at the time and organisms are constantly being reclassified and assigned to new genera as we gain knowledge. Not to mention that most of the binomial nomenclature was developed prior to and without the benefits of genetic analysis. So your points are well taken, both with regard to hybridization concerns as well as their ability to live together harmoniously without concerns over competition for dominance and survival within their ecological niches and resources.

I've read on so many sites about the dim view taken on cohabitation, so to the extreme of blocking the word itself as if a 4 letter word, yet no one seems to specifically define cohabitation (which can have several definitions) let alone why they're concerned about it. In the broadest sense of the word, housing dart frogs with isopods and springtails would certainly qualify as cohabitation.
 

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yet no one seems to specifically define cohabitation (which can have several definitions)
Searching the term 'mixing' will give enough information to know what the situation is, even if it is extraordinarily hard to specify both necessary and sufficient conditions for the term to apply (which is actually the case for any minimally complex substantive concept).

Also, those archives give much detail (including by folks who are no longer active here, some of whom are professionally trained and experienced in the issue) on why keepers are concerned about it, details that would be impossible to do justice to in a single thread like this one.
 
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Thanks for the information and a good place to start to catching up on the history behind this. I didn't realize that this concept was based upon professional opinions by true experts, so definitely worth study. I guess I had assumed that much of this was based upon dogma and old wives tails similar to the beliefs common among some professional dog and cat breeders that I've encountered, where most is derived from superstition rather than sound scientific principles. Thanks again.
 
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