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I would like to hear some personal experiences with keeping Clown Tree Frogs. I have read a couple of care sheets on different sites but I would really like to hear from someone on the board that keeps them. If you know someone who keeps them please point me in their direction so that I can pm them and chat. I have kept Red Eye Tree frogs before and am mainly interested in whether the care is almost identical to them. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Sorry for the typo. The title says Clown frogs and I mean Clown Tree frogs. If the mods could fix this please do. Thanks.
 

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depends on the humidity in your house. Mine is fairly dry in winter so I use all glass. They do like a heavily planted tank and a decent size water area. Unlike most of the leaf frogs they are found near water even outside of breeding season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
depends on the humidity in your house. Mine is fairly dry in winter so I use all glass. They do like a heavily planted tank and a decent size water area. Unlike most of the leaf frogs they are found near water even outside of breeding season.
Could you post a pics of your setup please? Or you can send a pic to my email at [email protected]. It's not dry here very much where I live so I wonder if I should use an all glass lid. Thanks for the info.
 

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depends on the humidity in your house. Mine is fairly dry in winter so I use all glass. They do like a heavily planted tank and a decent size water area. Unlike most of the leaf frogs they are found near water even outside of breeding season.
I have seen very basic setups that involve a layer of sphag on the bottom and a big pothos growing in the tank.

What really sets these guys apart as far as plants go is to make sure that the leaves are strong because they love to use them for sleeping, etc. Anything that can hold their weight would do - obviously pothos is the easiest.

mantisdragon91 - they do actually require a water dish? It's been a while since being familiar with their tank setups.

As far as feeding goes, hydei FFs would be on the small side; smaller crickets are a common go-to staple.
 

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Like roman said if you give them a larger water area you can maybe luck out and get some en (in?) situ breeding and dispense with the whole rainchamber pain. Good luck! JVK
 

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I have seen very basic setups that involve a layer of sphag on the bottom and a big pothos growing in the tank.

What really sets these guys apart as far as plants go is to make sure that the leaves are strong because they love to use them for sleeping, etc. Anything that can hold their weight would do - obviously pothos is the easiest.

mantisdragon91 - they do actually require a water dish? It's been a while since being familiar with their tank setups.


As far as feeding goes, hydei FFs would be on the small side; smaller crickets are a common go-to staple.
Most of the smaller tree frogs species available on the market from South America are actually found fairly close to water in the wild and are not paricularly seasonal in their breeding. Thus I would highly recommend a water area when housing any of the following species:

Clowns. Hourglass, Hatchet Faces, Punctata, Bird Poop, Super and regular tiger leg Monkey frogs.
 
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