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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the best way? I have been told to use Goo-Gone (a product available here in the U.S.) by a pet store. But they told me not to use it on the inside of the tank. However, if I use it to remove the tape marks and then scrub thoroughly with alcohol and detergent, wouldn't it be okay?

- Bill
 

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try using a lemon and a razor blade scraper. use the juice of the lemon and also rub the peel on the tape. Dont use goo gone. its a pain to clean.
DONT USE DETERGENT. It contains surfactants that bond with the glass, making it "unclean".
If you need to clean the inside, use lemon juice or vinegar, razor blade and good old manpower

Since you seem newer, you shouldent use ANY chemical on or around your frogs. No bleaches, ammonias, glass cleaners. I get a nice shine on the tanks with some lemon juice on a unbleached paper towel, rinse with clean water.
 

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Rubbing alcohol would also be safe to use. (assuming you are talking about an empty viv and not one with frogs in it)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
try using a lemon and a razor blade scraper. use the juice of the lemon and also rub the peel on the tape. Dont use goo gone. its a pain to clean.
DONT USE DETERGENT. It contains surfactants that bond with the glass, making it "unclean".
If you need to clean the inside, use lemon juice or vinegar, razor blade and good old manpower

Since you seem newer, you shouldent use ANY chemical on or around your frogs. No bleaches, ammonias, glass cleaners. I get a nice shine on the tanks with some lemon juice on a unbleached paper towel, rinse with clean water.
Bleach isn't OK? I volunteer at the local zoo, and we use bleach on lots of stuff. I know a bit about chemistry, and *THINK* all that is left from bleach after you let the water dry is table salt...
 

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Bleach is so nasty that I don't really like to use it on anything, not to mention that organic matter renders it pretty useless which is hard to avoid in natural environments such as vivs.

Also, even if the only thing that is left is salt after you're done, that's also not good for frogs if they're exposed to it continuously... effects osmotic pressure and such.
 

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Bleach isn't OK? I volunteer at the local zoo, and we use bleach on lots of stuff. I know a bit about chemistry, and *THINK* all that is left from bleach after you let the water dry is table salt...
I missed that. Yes, bleach is commonly used to sterilize non porous items for your viv. We also use a 5% to 10% bleach solution for 5 to 10 minutes for a live plant dip to kill off some of the nasties. Just make sure you rinse really well. I'm not sure it would do much to soften adhesives, though.
 

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WD40 is the best remover of duct tape adhesive residue....so says the man that has sold duct tape for over 20 years!!!
You can't use that inside your viv, can you Mark? What would you recommend to clean off the WD40 residue?

This is for those saying you cannot use bleach in a viv. It is the recommended method of sterilization by ASN. http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/ge...t/26685-asn-quarantine-medical-protocols.html
Also, punch "bleach" into the search engine and 35 pages of froggers using bleach pop up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OK, about the salt: I'm using it in tank without any frogs it it, so it will no affect the frogs. I will rinse it thoroughly.

And I just emailed an animal care supervisor where I work as a volunteer. He said bleach and glass are fine. Just rinse thoroughly and allow to dry for one hour.
 

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If WD-40 is the best at removing it, that indicates the adhesive has some long chain polymers in it which is why it doesn't readily come off the glass with water or alcohol. You need another product that is similar to it in make up to get it to dissolve. I would suggest turpentine which will mainly evaporate but any residue could then be removed with acetone (becareful of frost bite as the acetone evaporates). As an alternative possibility, why not use chewing gum remover? Chewing gum remover

If you flash freeze it, the glue should become brittle and you may be able to quickly scrape it off the glass.

Ed
 

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I will second Pumilos choice of rubbing alcohol. A razor blade would work well to take off the majority then hit it with rubbing alcohol. Razor blades will scratch tempered glass though so keep that in mind if you have tempered~
Nate
 

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I will second Pumilos choice of rubbing alcohol. A razor blade would work well to take off the majority then hit it with rubbing alcohol. Razor blades will scratch tempered glass though so keep that in mind if you have tempered~
Nate
If you use brand new razor blades, replacing them often, and make sure you keep the glass wet, you shouldn't have a problem using them on tempered glass. I do it all the time when installing patio doors.
 

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Bleach is so nasty that I don't really like to use it on anything, not to mention that organic matter renders it pretty useless which is hard to avoid in natural environments such as vivs.

Also, even if the only thing that is left is salt after you're done, that's also not good for frogs if they're exposed to it continuously... effects osmotic pressure and such.
Certainly not saying it can't be used, just saying I don't like it.
 

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If you use brand new razor blades, replacing them often, and make sure you keep the glass wet, you shouldn't have a problem using them on tempered glass. I do it all the time when installing patio doors.
Window cleaner by trade here...20 years. lol
I have used razor blades as well but its a risky proposition at best especially with modern fabrication techniques of glass. (fabrication debris)
 
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