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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a fogger a while back (before I knew it was bad for frogs). I still haven’t taken it down, so it’s hooked up to the tank. I had it filled with tap water (I was using it for a photo), but I forgot to turn the loop off after I used it for the photo (photo wasn’t in the vivarium, just wanna clarify. I just used the fogger for an effect). A few hours later, I came back and saw my fogger was filling my tank with tap water fog. I turned it off and got rid of all the fog. Do I need to be worried? I wasn’t using the water in the fogger for frogs, because I’d read foggers are bad for them, so I didn’t dechlorinate it (I didn’t think chlorine would hurt my camera).
 

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Chlorine is fairly unstable when exposed to uv, heat, air, and organics. It's likely that most of the active properties were used up within the first few hours. There may have been other minerals in your tap water that could be problematic, but you could certainly flush out the substrate with excess clean distilled or RO water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Chlorine is fairly unstable when exposed to uv, heat, air, and organics. It's likely that most of the active properties were used up within the first few hours. There may have been other minerals in your tap water that could be problematic, but you could certainly flush out the substrate with excess clean distilled or RO water.
My back wall is also made of xps. Is that ok?
 

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please don’t lay into me about all the chemicals in my city water because you are probably right, same for not changing water bowl daily…. but…… I have used tap water from my city supply for my frogs since 2016. I have not lost any frogs. 5 frogs now over 6 years old. Fogger set for 20 minutes three times a day. Water bowl filled up daily from tap. And I may actually clean their bowl( yep the same one they do their business in) once or twice a month. Yet they are over 6 years old. How they do it with me going against all practical husbandry thinking is beyond me but maybe nature is able to adapt better than we give it credit.
 

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please don’t lay into me about all the chemicals in my city water because you are probably right, same for not changing water bowl daily…. but…… I have used tap water from my city supply for my frogs since 2016. I have not lost any frogs. 5 frogs now over 6 years old. Fogger set for 20 minutes three times a day. Water bowl filled up daily from tap. And I may actually clean their bowl( yep the same one they do their business in) once or twice a month. Yet they are over 6 years old. How they do it with me going against all practical husbandry thinking is beyond me but maybe nature is able to adapt better than we give it credit.
Municipal water quality varies widely across the country, and while yours may be low in TDS, chlorine, fluoride, etc., the same may not be the case for someone else referring to your post for care guidelines. Also, 5 frogs @ 6 years of age represents a very small case study, given that many dart species can live 15-20 years under optimal conditions.
It sounds like you have been fortunate not to suffer any losses or obvious injury due to your husbandry practices, but may I ask why you choose to use untreated tap water, and leave obviously stagnant, waste-laden water in your hydration points for so long, when you seem to be aware of the potential risks?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Municipal water quality varies widely across the country, and while yours may be low in TDS, chlorine, fluoride, etc., the same may not be the case for someone else referring to your post for care guidelines. Also, 5 frogs @ 6 years of age represents a very small case study, given that many dart species can live 15-20 years under optimal conditions.
It sounds like you have been fortunate not to suffer any losses or obvious injury due to your husbandry practices, but may I ask why you choose to use untreated tap water, and leave obviously stagnant, waste-laden water in your hydration points for so long, when you seem to be aware of the potential risks?
I hadn’t been using the fogger for the frogs. I bought it for a different animal earlier. I never got around to disconnecting one end from the tank. I was using it to shoot photos (fog makes things look really cool). The way my fogger works, you have to start the loop to get it going. So every time you turn it on, it begins whatever cycle you programmed (I did a few minutes every couple hours). I forgot to turn it off after shooting the photo, so it activated again a few hours later. I didn’t feel water quality would impact the photoshoot, so I didn’t treat it with anything. I disconnected it from the tank. It’s been a couple weeks and I don’t think it harmed the frogs.
 

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I hadn’t been using the fogger for the frogs. I bought it for a different animal earlier. I never got around to disconnecting one end from the tank. I was using it to shoot photos (fog makes things look really cool). The way my fogger works, you have to start the loop to get it going. So every time you turn it on, it begins whatever cycle you programmed (I did a few minutes every couple hours). I forgot to turn it off after shooting the photo, so it activated again a few hours later. I didn’t feel water quality would impact the photoshoot, so I didn’t treat it with anything. I disconnected it from the tank. It’s been a couple weeks and I don’t think it harmed the frogs.
My previous post was in reply to Fuscopete, hope you didn't think it was directed at you. You were obviously concerned enough with your situation to seek advice in the attempt to improve the issue.
 

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Municipal water quality varies widely across the country, and while yours may be low in TDS, chlorine, fluoride, etc., the same may not be the case for someone else referring to your post for care guidelines. Also, 5 frogs @ 6 years of age represents a very small case study, given that many dart species can live 15-20 years under optimal conditions.
It sounds like you have been fortunate not to suffer any losses or obvious injury due to your husbandry practices, but may I ask why you choose to use untreated tap water, and leave obviously stagnant, waste-laden water in your hydration points for so long, when you seem to be aware of the potential risks?
As I noted in my post ….. I am sure that all practical wisdom would suggest, using chemically treated water from my city or any other municipal water source IS NOT a good idea. Thank You for wanting to make sure no one would take my comments as ”best practice” AND I asked not to be jumped on but there you went :sneaky:. So to make sure of my point that I must have missed let me be clear that caretakers should do their best to provide a clean, healthy environment BUT even under what should be considered questionable conditions nature sure seems to have an amazing ability to adapt to less than perfect circumstances.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
As I noted in my post ….. I am sure that all practical wisdom would suggest, using chemically treated water from my city or any other municipal water source IS NOT a good idea. Thank You for wanting to make sure no one would take my comments as ”best practice” AND I asked not to be jumped on but there you went :sneaky:. So to make sure of my point that I must have missed let me be clear that caretakers should do their best to provide a clean, healthy environment BUT even under what should be considered questionable conditions nature sure seems to have an amazing ability to adapt to less than perfect circumstances.
From what I’ve heard, a fogger is not a good idea. It can suffocate the lil fellas
 

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From what I’ve heard, a fogger is not a good idea. It can suffocate the lil fellas
Perhaps “Dane” could help with this one too but Darts as well as all frogs must keep their skin moist in order to breath, exchange gases within their bodies and drink to a lesser extent. So the notion that a fogger would not be good because it would suffocate them may not be accurate. Perhaps there is another reason for not using a fogger.
 

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My goodness, you expect people NOT to make it painfully obvious that your dangerous care advice was dangerous care advice?
No. What I expect is a courteous exchange of thoughts. Not being called out by an administrator and premium member. Nothing in my post AND follow up post suggested an “obvious dangerous care advice” That should be followed. It stated my experience. Guess I was unaware of the sensitivities that a few of you have. Life is great…..go out and enjoy it!
 

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This certainly escalated
That happens quite often when a concern for animal welfare is inappropriately taken as personal attack. Since we're not going to let issues of animal welfare slide around here, the burden of change is on all of us to not take such comments about frog care personally.

If anyone is actually the subject of a personal attack in a post, please report the post (hit the kebab menu icon -- the three dots on the top right of the post -- and then hit 'report' from the menu). If you need to report a PM, the report button is on the bottom right of the message. Reports will be swiftly addressed.

But that's all over for now. Back to the regular show. :)
 
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