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Hmmm beyond the potential for obligates does this eventually mean Colombian Ranitomeya? I love to see a sustainable business model in action where cash flows back to the source. I really have to tip my hat to understory on this one.
 

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nice to see some colombian frogs, but i wish they were something other than truncs. i'll second frogparty's comment and say that i'd really like to see some ranitomeya, or minyobates, or other oophaga.

james
 

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The email mentioned the possibility of Adinobates sp. coming in...is it too much to wish for Andinobates dorisswansonae?
 

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So sweet! I remember a couple years ago when Sean was trying to bring the minyobates in...I was so pumped only to be let down when it didn't happen. The wonders of what can be brought in!
 

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I ordered 2 truncs! i love these frogs...lol im in heaven and will be forever if UE gets even more Colombians into the hobby. *hint*Excidobates captivus*hint*
 

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Not surprisingly much of the focus here seems to be on the what's next as opposed to the what is now. We fully expected this and it is of course understandable. However, it is somewhat dissapointing that the thought of other species is seemingly detracting from what is at hand. F1 locality specific, legally imported, captive bred Colombian truncatus. Truncatus live in a huge variety of habitats, and are extremely tough, beautiful frogs. The golden yellow colour these particular ones exhibit is difficult to capture with a lens. They are pretty unique mid sized frogs and certainly worthy of a place in any collection.

That being said, this is another monumental effort put forth by a very very small group of extremely gifted, persistent, and dedicated people. (referring here to the Tesors's team) This effort long predates our involvement, and has endured years and years of bureaucratic wheel spinning where all involved felt at times it was a completely hopeless effort in absolute frustration. The reality is from here on out much of the forward momentum and success of the project depends on the frog community. Your support of efforts such as this through purchasing our first offering, truncatus, will help ensure the continuation of work towards additional species.

It should go without saying that everyone involved intends to be in this for the long haul. An effort such as this is not undertaken with the goal that it be a short term one. We sincerely hope to be working with Tesoros in Colombia for the next 20 years if not longer.

Each new species, morph etc will come very slowly. Andinobates and Ranitomeya from Colombia are a few years down the road yet. If anyone is visualizing a time when large Colombian Oophagas are available in any magnitude close to that which we see with pumilio, then think again. The reproductive capacity of them simply will not permit that, and any potential availability of Oophaga will be from vivarium bred specimens.

The goal is as stated in our news letter is to throughout the duration of this project, make as wide a selection of Colombian dendrobatids available as possible. You can expect to see the same quality you are accustomed to from UE, and you can expect our continued efforts to work towards releasing new offerings provided that the market continually supports it.

Nick, E. Captivus is a Peruvian and potentially an Ecuadorian species.

James, are you a glass half empty kind of guy? :)

best wishes,
mark
 

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Very exciting news indeed. There is some great articles/pics on the webs of Andinobates, its defintely exciting to think about quality specimens that will be available through sustainable, responisble projects as oppose to careless, reckless harvest. Hopefully these efforts help to preserve these frogs valuable and often relatively tiny habitats.

one of the articles I spotted:

Dendrobates.org - Ranitomeya
 

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I am sure we will never truely appreciate the bureaucratic nightmare this has been, I for one am not a fan of Truncs however a species that may seem mundane I truely look forward to seeing from Colombia is their amazing Auratus. Colombia like Peru offers such a diversity of amazing species it is hard not to fantasize about the possibilities.
Mark would it be appropriate to see a price for the Truncs on this forum?
 

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i try to be a glass half full type of guy mark :D

i just thought it a strange frog as a first offering. the truncatus that exist here (the US) already are an under-appreciated frog with a seemingly small following (there seems to be a resurgence in the popularity of the blues however) so you'll have to excuse me if i was somewhat baffled by their being the selection for this offering. i have to believe that you would have rather imported a frog with more of the WOW factor (like the benedictas have) but this was the most viable option.

either way, its fantastic that the doors are starting to creak open to this country, and i doubt that anyone will find that understory hasnt continued to be one of the finest operations around which continually seeks out the difficult tasks and takes charge of leading the community through hard work,the way no others could.

james
 

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i could have sworn Captivus were colombian. well if they're peruvian maybe chances are better? :)
 

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Not surprisingly much of the focus here seems to be on the what's next as opposed to the what is now. We fully expected this and it is of course understandable. However, it is somewhat dissapointing that the thought of other species is seemingly detracting from what is at hand. F1 locality specific, legally imported, captive bred Colombian truncatus. Truncatus live in a huge variety of habitats, and are extremely tough, beautiful frogs. The golden yellow colour these particular ones exhibit is difficult to capture with a lens. They are pretty unique mid sized frogs and certainly worthy of a place in any collection.
I, for one, couldn't be happier that truncatus are the first frogs being offered (I have been worried the last couple years that this is a frog that is dwindling from the captive hobby and at risk of falling through the proverbial cracks). The first thing I noted in seeing the images on your site, Mark, was the markedly intense coloration--very nice frogs.

Hopefully folks will support the availability of Colombian frogs of proper legal origins and processes through the efforts of Understory.
 

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Thanks for the input guys.

@CBreon, yeah the Andinobates are incredible looking species. I as much as anyone else would love to enjoy these in my vivaria as well. Keep your fingers crossed, this will be a good chance to exercise patience :)

@Mr Pulawski I do not know if it is appropriate or not, but a mod can decide. The price is $75 for frogs which will be 1/2 to most cases 3/4grown. The Colombian auratus are something special indeed, I am with you there.

@James I see what you are saying, but we are looking at the situation from two different perspectives. Truncatus is a species of least concern, abundant and easily accessible from Bogota (for purposes of founder stock). This is a very heavily monitored/supervised project especially so since nothing of the sort is currently operational. In situations like this, and it was the same in Peru, acquisition of and approval for additional species is often hinged upon success with previous species. Thus, the fantastic success they have demonstrated with truncatus in captivity will serve as a very solid foundation for solicitation and approval of additional species, several of which are well underway. Had they started with lehmanni, showed a production of 1 or 2 or 3 offspring, it is a pretty safe bet the project would have ended there. So from our perspective, truncatus was the ideal species to get the ball rolling. I was just excited to clear a box of truncatus through customs as I would have been histos, after years of waiting it was a thrill to receive anything Colombian!

hope that provided some further clarification
 

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I kind of figured this would be the response by some as a lot of people don't think much of truncatus.

truncatus is one of my favorite PDFs and as Mark P. said you really cannot capture the true colors in a camera lens. There are so few blood lines in the US that I bet most have never seen them in person and once again I have seen next to no photos that do them justice. If you put any nice daylight bulb on truncs it looks like they are blacklight responsive.

I cannot say I'm not interested (a lot!) in Colombian Oophaga but I'm very excited that I can soon get F1 locale specific yellow truncatus and hopefully some other species that have been inbred to death like blue truncs and all the Phyllobates sp.
 
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