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Discussion Starter #1
These things are quick and tiny! I could easily get any of my Dendrobates and probably even the imitator. The benedicta are just gone in an instant though.

I’m trying to use a transparent tube but even unlatching the door is enough to send them hiding.

Ideas?
 

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For me a shot glass works best. 90% of the time I needed to wreck their entire tank. And that is exactly the reason why i hate benedicta! they are by far the most annoying frogs for me. :D
 

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For me a shot glass works best. 90% of the time I needed to wreck their entire tank. And that is exactly the reason why i hate benedicta! they are by far the most annoying frogs for me. :D
LOL...I remember being attacked by swarms of aggressive tinctorius. I looked at 'em the wrong way and they'd go all Jurassic Park on me. :eek:

I guess benedicta are on the other side of the spectrum.
 

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If you're not in a hurry, put some deli cups in the tank. When you see one in the deli cup, reach in and put the lid on...I was able to catch all five that way....but it took two weeks.
 

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I've been learning how to manage this as well, with mixed success... Glass tubes or shot glasses seem to be popular, but I've had some difficulty using them myself.

I've had the most success with a small deli cup and a bromeliad-based strategy. If your Ranitomeyas are at all like my imitators they have favorite broms that they're frequently hanging around in. I'll put a couple small broms in easily accessible areas and then wait until one of my guys is in there. Then I'll put the deli cup over the top of the brom, upside down, and use the lid to lightly pressure the base of the brom where the frog is until it hops up into the container. It's worked pretty well for me, but you do need to have a smallish brom with a frog in it!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There’s only one benedicta that I know it’s habits. It lives in a little curled up oak leaf.

Thanks for the suggestion though. I may try a shallow deli container and throw fruit flies in there.
 

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Sorry to revive an old thread, but I imagine others may search this topic as well (as I know I did!).

I found this to be successful for me, after some trial and error with various methods:

Clear tubing used for air powered fish sponge filters, cut to various lengths (depending on where in a tank I need to access, ie. I did one short, one medium and one longer).

Pack the end with Sphagnum.

Leave the tubes in the tank for a week+.

I've caught 8 little guys this way, but not necessarily how you might think, let alone how I thought!

About 5 of them I caught by placing fruit flies into the tubing after it had been in for a week, then placing it back in the tank. After about 10 minutes, I returned and found various frogs inside the tubes eating away. Plug an end, remove!

The remainder, I found were less spooked by the tubes after they had been in there for a bit, so were a bit less jumpy when I took a tube during feeding and caught them by slowly placing over their bodies on an angle, and shooing them in with some tweezers (similar to the glass tube method).

This is for R. imitators. When I started trying to move the offspring, I was quite disheartened. Now, I have been able to move every frog I wanted within a 2 week span.

I should mention as well...patience is key.

Hope this may help someone.

Regards,
 
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