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I have a temperature gradient in my new tank of about 82 degrees towards the top to about 75 in the bottom of the tank. There is a ledge so the frogs can get into the higher temps. If they get to hot, will they come down, or just sit there and let themselves be possibly damaged?
 

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I would say frogs have some thermoregulatory habits. Native NA species certainly bask in the sun. And darts, if exposed to extreme heat, often go to the water feature or curl up under some shelter.

Is it an emergency response or normal daily activity???... that I don't know. I personally feel much safer with an evently heated tank.

JOSH
 

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Just wanted to bump this for some more possible discussion... any more insights into this issue? I've been interested in this for awhile as well, especially in regards to planning larger tanks.
 

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It is an interesting topic... Id have to say yes they do.

The only example I have is on my pum tanks where I had run 2 lights for a bit but then noticed they stayed on the ground where they had been in the broms. I turned off 1 light and they are now back to normal. Id guess it was pushing 83-85 at the top so they stayed at the bottom where it was cooler.
 

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Some of thier habits that may or may not be due to attempts to thermo regulate may be due to the brightness of our lights and not just heat/or lack of...atleast in part. I think we in general probably have our tanks way brighter then they would prefer.
 

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Dendro Dave said:
Some of thier habits that may or may not be due to attempts to thermo regulate may be due to the brightness of our lights and not just heat/or lack of...atleast in part. I think we in general probably have our tanks way brighter then they would prefer.
You'd think that but its not true. The light hitting the rainforest floor I guarantee you is brighter than most of our tanks. Go and buy yourself a light meter and you'll see what I mean.

Full sun (in FL) at noon or so is about 10,000 foot candles of light on the surface of a slab of concrete. Measure that same time of day under a bunch of trees and its about 4000 foot candles or so depending on the density. My average reading in a viv so far has been a range from 500 foot candles to about 3000 foot candles or so at various points (heights) of the viv using the Home Depot twisty bulbs.

We know that since the tanks are sealed and have no "real" airflow, it creates a little greenhouse affect. I'm betting they were just too hot. I've read a little about thermoregulation in amphibians and from the little I remember, I seem to be inclined to say that many amphibians can (and do) thermoregulate to some degree.
 

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If an environmental factor is too extreme, they will move away from it, but any organism will do that. Amphibians are generally more sensitive to humdity microclimates, and rainforest tropical amphibians (under the canopy has very regular climate) do it a lot less than animals in climates with more temperature swings, but they probibly do it.
 

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Interesting. Frustratingly, in captivity I'd imagine places within a vivarium that have higher average temperatures *usually* also have lower average humidities... casual observation would make it difficult to distinguish what factor was causal in any observed regional preference, if any.
 

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The biggest reason I'd see an area in the tank having higher temps and lower humidity is a top vent near the lights... the lights being the warmest place in the tank, and the vent causing lower humidity. No vent, and the humidity would likely be even throughout the tank. I use glass lids on my tanks and can easily created a temp gradient in my 10gs... I just move the lights (two flourescent tubes) to the back of the tank (so they light the back half) and the back half of the tank will be warmer.
 

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Yes with a qualification that it is species dependent as well as whether it is an attempt to engage in "behavioral fevers".

The gradiation in question is probably not what will really cause basking behaviors...

Ed
 

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KeroKero said:
The biggest reason I'd see an area in the tank having higher temps and lower humidity is a top vent near the lights... the lights being the warmest place in the tank, and the vent causing lower humidity. No vent, and the humidity would likely be even throughout the tank. I use glass lids on my tanks and can easily created a temp gradient in my 10gs... I just move the lights (two flourescent tubes) to the back of the tank (so they light the back half) and the back half of the tank will be warmer.
You'd think that. Heck, I thought that myself until I tested it. The heat from the bulbs will dry the air out at the top of the viv sealed or not. At least in mine it does. I see differences of 20% sometimes. I guess its b/c no viv is TOTALLY sealed.
 

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You'd think that. Heck, I thought that myself until I tested it. The heat from the bulbs will dry the air out at the top of the viv sealed or not. At least in mine it does. I see differences of 20% sometimes. I guess its b/c no viv is TOTALLY sealed.
I've observed this too.
 

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I distinctly remember that my old male tinc used to sit directly under the light on a leaf for hours on cooler days. On very hot days, he would rarely venture outside his cork bark lodge.
 
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