Dendroboard banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that Chorus frogs come from wooded, marginal areas with a good bit of water and plants. My question is what is the best way that I can create a swampy habitat and keep it clean? I know advanced aquarists have designed beautiful dirt bottomed aquariums, but can it be done with a much smaller water volume and no external filtration? I have considered planting bamboo(like those sold for Beta fish tanks) stalks into a simple gravel layer and adding some pothos, but this would look quite generic IMO. Any thoughts to share would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

JBear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I have abaout a half dozen michigan chorus frogs (I'm assuming that's what your talking about) in one of my vivs, and they seem to be doing just fine. I have them in a 70 that houses a pair of cobalts. I know that somebody is going to jump on me about mixing or something, but it was my first viv, before I found this forum, and before I knew pretty much anything about darts. The tank is planted like your typical tinc viv with a small waterfall and leaf litter/moss floor. They have been in there for about 2 years. I used to feed them pinheads, but now they have learned that misting means feeding time, and they love heidi. I hear quite a bit of calling, so I assume they are happy, almost like running your thumbnail along a comb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have abaout a half dozen michigan chorus frogs (I'm assuming that's what your talking about) in one of my vivs, and they seem to be doing just fine. I have them in a 70 that houses a pair of cobalts. I know that somebody is going to jump on me about mixing or something, but it was my first viv, before I found this forum, and before I knew pretty much anything about darts. The tank is planted like your typical tinc viv with a small waterfall and leaf litter/moss floor. They have been in there for about 2 years. I used to feed them pinheads, but now they have learned that misting means feeding time, and they love heidi. I hear quite a bit of calling, so I assume they are happy, almost like running your thumbnail along a comb.
I will not "jump on you", and will add that I had mixed species of newts and frogs when I was much younger and without the knowledge time and study brings. I appreciate the feedback, and will look into a more terrestrial viv with a smaller water feature achieved through false bottom, and design. Thank you for the perspective.

JBear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I find them a lot in damp but not wet forests, usually near water. I just looked them up on google and I think they are also called western chorus frog, and spring peeper.
These are 2 different frogs within the same family. Are you saying that some are W. Chorus and some are Peepers?

To answer your question the specimen is a Western Chorus Frog(let).

JBear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Can I use cotton balls to stuff the openings that are ther for airlines/electrical? Thanks!

JBear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I have always known them as chorus frogs. I just googled "michigan chorus frog" and clicked on the first good pic that I saw. It said that they are also called western chorus frogs and spring peepers? I always hear locals say "spring peepers" but don't actually know what they are. All that I see including mine are maybe a little over an inch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I don't see why coton balls wouldn't work? I'm assuming that you are talking about an exoterra? They can escape through the tiniest of holes. I have heard of people using expandable foam earplugs, which I think would hold up better. I personally would silicone them, and if you ever change your mind the silicone is easy enough to remove.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Spring peeper is a differnt frog because we don't get chorus frogs in Maryland. I'm guessing that yours is the Michigan Chorus Frog. What came up in my search was the Western Chorus Frog (Pseudacris triseriata triseriata), is this also known as the Michigan Chorus frog? The spring peeper's scientific name is Pseudacris crucifer. So similar but not the same. I would think that you would keep them like a woodland vivarium with a pond or a stream in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I know that Chorus frogs come from wooded, marginal areas with a good bit of water and plants. My question is what is the best way that I can create a swampy habitat and keep it clean? I know advanced aquarists have designed beautiful dirt bottomed aquariums, but can it be done with a much smaller water volume and no external filtration? I have considered planting bamboo(like those sold for Beta fish tanks) stalks into a simple gravel layer and adding some pothos, but this would look quite generic IMO. Any thoughts to share would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

JBear
This was the focus of the post...

JBear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
the tank that mine are in has a hydroton bottom. the waterfall is on one side and the pump is in the opposite corner, so the water does flow through the hydroton, acting like an internal filter. when I made the housing for the pump, I used foam carved like rocks w cement over it. then, i drilled a lot of holes in the side I wanted water to come in. I made it so there was enough room to put filter packs inside, between the pump and wall. I used the filter packs out of the small fish tank filters that hang over the side. Just took out the hard plastic frame on the inside of the filters. but I dont use them now as the hydroton works pretty well by itself.
sorry for previous hijack, hope this helps. mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
When I worked in a cypress swamp in South Carolina, we maintained a group of the Southern Chorus frog in an indoor exhibit. It was a 20 gallon long tank. It was 4/5s terrestrial, with a deep pool on one end. There were branches in the water that allowed the frogs to climb back onto the drier area. In the water we just had gravel with leaves covering the gravel layer. If the frogs were threatened they would hop into the water and hide in the leaf litter. I planted local ferns on the drier part and that was it. We didn't use any water filtration and there didn't seem to be a need for it.

As far as achieving the dirt bottomed aquariums, ADA makes a substrate for aquariums, that might be what you're talking about. Amazonia II is one of their more popular varieties. If you're looking to achieve water flow, the filters they make for turtle tanks are fairly compact and have great filtration for such a small size.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top