Dendroboard banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if one could blend up Java Moss and buttermilk in a blinder to make a paste, then pour it onto a soil, and have it grow?

I heard of other mosses were able to spread this way faster than natural spore method. Do you think this holds true for Java moss, or does java moss not use spores?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,799 Posts
I was reading a paper on mosses for the aquarium, and it said that java has never had a sporophyte produced. Im not sure how accurate that was though.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Plants

I can believe that. Ferns and mosses are the least changed things on earth next to cockroaches. LOL.

I don't think that whoever wrote what your read know exactly what he was writing because the sentence doesn't make sence exactly.

meaning: The spore-producing phase in the life cycle of a plant that exhibits alternation of generations. Barb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
696 Posts
Re: Plants

waretrop said:
Ferns and mosses are the least changed things on earth next to cockroaches. LOL.
You need to include my wife's mind when she says no more frogs!
:lol:
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
Java moss does produce spores, but that is a very slow method and it’s likely you won’t even see java moss in its sporophyte stage in your terrarium, the stage you see is the gametophyte. However, java moss does spread very quickly non-sexually! The buttermilk method would probably just take longer than letting it grown on its own. The buttermilk method works best with moss that has recently experienced a sporophyte generation and still has spores that have yet to germinate (not sure if spores germinate but I don’t have any other word). So it is best to just put the chunk of java in your tank and let the gametophytes spread on their own.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Anyone know if there is a way to kill the snails first without killing the java moss?
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Lastime I tried java in my tank I didn't cut it up.. I just layed it in there on the soil and it didn't spread too fast. Should I cut it up inso small pieces and then scatterit all inside the tank?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
Just some more questions about how java moss grows and can be propagated. First, does it grow in one direction only? I recently put some in my vivarium and it seems to have a root end and a tip end with the tips seeking light and moisture. Second, can it be propagated through cuttings?

Thank you in advance,

Marcos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
If you are talking about aquatic snails, they will die shortly after adding the moss to your tank, as long as the moss isn’t in a water feature. I wouldn’t mind the snails but that’s just me.
When adding it to your tank, it is best to keep it really moist for the first week or so. This way it can transition from aquatic to terrestrial. Java moss needs relatively bright light and grows very well and very fast under CF.
I wouldn’t cut it into little pieces. It spreads faster as a clump because there are more ends for the moss to spread from. It can be propagated from small clumps better than individual strands…but be sure to tear the pieces from the original clump instead of cutting it, that way you get the entire strand.
Java moss, like all moss has a “root” end and I guess you could call the other end the tip. The “roots” would be holding the moss to the substrate while the tips photosynthesize. But if you mean that your java moss is growing in one direction as a clump, like to the left or to the right, than that is probably because it is growing towards more favorable conditions, brighter light or more moisture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
986 Posts
Enigmius93 said:
I was wondering if one could blend up Java Moss and buttermilk in a blinder to make a paste, then pour it onto a soil, and have it grow?

I heard of other mosses were able to spread this way faster than natural spore method. Do you think this holds true for Java moss, or does java moss not use spores?
I have not tried this with Java, but my guess is that it would be more of a smelly mess than a success. I just spread the java moss very thinly over a constantly wet area and let it do its thing. Bright light is a must for quick growth with Java.

When happy, Java moss will send up sporophytes, and you can see them looking like little black poppy seeds on the end of an eyelash poking up all over the Java carpet. After this happens, you will have Java in places that you never thought possible--in a few months it can start growing in spots 18-20" away very easily.

As for killing snails, I soak my Java in a 1 bleach: 5 water solution for 10-15 minutes, and rinse, rinse, rinse like mad, allowing it to soak overnight in RO water for dissipation once my rinsing regimen is complete. That seems to do the trick for snails, and should be effective for other nasties. To my knowledge, beer will not kill aquatic snails.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top