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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey so i am building a large fake rock out of styrofoam and some polymer modified grout. I will be posting some pics when it is finished. However I am wondering about coating with epoxy. I have heard that you do not need to but it seems everyone does. It will be used in a paludarium and have a waterfall. Do you think it is necessary to use epoxy?
 

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It's only necessary to coat it in epoxy if you don't want to cure it for weeks to months. It takes a very long time for it to become truly cured which is why many people coat in epoxy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK that is what I thought. Luckily for me, the only reason I am making the rock now is because I plan on letting it cure/pH balance for 2 months while i continue to research everything else :)
 

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Spraying down with vinegar worth wonders as well.
I've worked with large redone concrete enclosures and if not sealed, the surface may cure while the inside of the concrete doesn't. If water can penetrate in through a crack or other means, you can see the concrete/plaster get small whitish seeps of minerals from the inside of the material.

Ed
 

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I've worked with large redone concrete enclosures and if not sealed, the surface may cure while the inside of the concrete doesn't. If water can penetrate in through a crack or other means, you can see the concrete/plaster get small whitish seeps of minerals from the inside of the material.

Ed
Second this. The cement can leak alkaline hydration products many years after the initial cure. Sealing is a very good idea on most hydrated cements. (Portland cement, quickcrete, grouts)
 

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I agree with you, though I've used this method for years when using concrete in koi ponds and it has worked quite well.

I've worked with large redone concrete enclosures and if not sealed, the surface may cure while the inside of the concrete doesn't. If water can penetrate in through a crack or other means, you can see the concrete/plaster get small whitish seeps of minerals from the inside of the material.

Ed
 
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