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Sorry to reply without any care info but I just wanted to say that I have seen this bufo for sale here and there and never understood why it wasn't being worked with. It is an amazing bufo. So good luck! if you are in fact getting them
 

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Bufo typhonius is a pretty old name for this amphibian...the current classification is Rhinella margaritifer.

They come in occasionally (usually from Suriname), but suffer from the typical "little brown frog" curse in which there is very little commercial interest for them. Keeping them alive longterm seems to be difficult, and there has been no successful captive breeding of them as far as I have been able to tell. There are various complexes of the species throughout Central and South America, and I have read some papers that seem to indicate some of them might feed primarily on ants...so I wonder if folks are trying to feed them crickets in captivity and they are wasting away. Hard to tell.

You probably won't find much captive care info on them and will have to discover a lot for yourself if you happen to keep them.
 

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i've found a few sites that say keep it like a dart and feed ff's but i'm trying to get as much info as i can
 

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I’ve had one for about 8 months now. Originally I purchased two, but I lost one over the summer. I keep him in an 18” X18” exotera with a pond area. I do not mist, so the leaf litter area, which is above a false bottom, is dry. I feed him dusted ¼” crickets. The coolest thing about this guy is that he calls in the evening when the aquarium lights go out in my classroom. The problem with him is that he is extremely cryptic. He hides under the leaf litter almost constantly. Occasionally we see his eye or nose poking out. The kids spotted him today. You could only see his head. Interestingly he was kind of pinkish today. There is no plant cover in this vivarium, so that may be causing some of the cryptic behavior. I’m going to add some Kangaroo paw fern, and a propped up piece of cork next week. Maybe that will bring him into view a little more often.
 

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I world defintly put some live plants and cork in there. The more hiding places the more you will see your frogs thats what I have learned with my vittatus maybe hes scared of so many people looking at him each day I dont know. but yah I would definitly try more plants
 

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I just picked up a group of these guys a few days ago, so its early for me to say what works. Right now they are being kept in a sterilite container with soil and heavy leaf litter cover and a few cork pieces. Leaf litter seems to be the preferred hiding spot. All three have been observed feeding on small crickets (3/8 and 1/4). I've noticed that activity level so far seems to be highest during early evening hours. They don't seem to mind me observing them either as even being in a new area they come out with me standing next to or over their enclosure.
 

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They look like mine. Very cool eyes. Good luck with them.
 

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This species is "complex"- it is composed of many different biological entities which are slowly being sorted out by the frog systematics folks.

High crest, Low crest, Highland, Lowland, Pond breeder, Stream breeder, Mid-dorsal Stripe, No stripe.... margaritifer has a little bit of everything.

This is the same group from which 'castaneoticus' (The toad who's tadpoles get eaten by castaneoticus the PDF) was separated by Caldwell.

Caldwell, Janalee P. 1991. A new species of toad in the genus Bufo from Pará, Brazil, with an unusual breeding site. Papéis Avulsos de Zoologia 37:389–400.

Caldwell, Janalee P. 1993. Brazil nut fruit capsules as phytotelmata: Interactions among anuran and insect larvae. Canadian Journal of Zoology 71:1193–1201.

Other papers that may be of interest:

Lima, A. P. and W. E. Magnusson. 2000. Does foraging Activity change with Ontogeny? An assessment for six sympatric species of postmetamorphic litter Anurans in Central Amazonia. Journal of Herpetology 34:192-200.

Hoogmoed, M. S. 1989. Biosystematics of South American Bufonidae, with special reference to the Bufo "typhonius" group. Pages 113-123 in Vertebrates in the Tropics. Alexander Koenig Zoological Research Institue and Zoological Museum, Bonn.

Cheers,

Afemoralis
 

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I still have the previously mentioned LTC (over two years now) B. margaritifer. I would like to find this guy a new home. He is an interesting toad who chirps a lot after the lights go out. He does not move around much, but in his current viv (lots of cover and a big broken flowerpot to sit under) he is usually visible. He eats dusted ¼” crickets. He came in with some imports from Surinam. Contact me if you are interested. I would like him to go to an experienced frogger, otherwise he can just stay here. The toad will be given to the most appropriate interested party and I will pay for shipping when the weather cools off a bit.
 
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