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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been doing a lot of research on this species and there has been mixed information on the success of keeping them, ei. large enclosure vs. avg. size enclosure, pairs vs. groups, etc.

I want to focus on those that have had success with breeding this species and if I could get some specs and hopefully pics of your viv to see how its laid out. I'd also like to get info on laying/depositing sites and age they started breeding for you.
Thanks _Dillon
 

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Hi Dillon,
We have kept and bred reticulata pretty consistently for about 8 years now. I think the problems people get into with them are based around the fact that they are a little more unforgiving than other species to what some might term benign neglect, or in certain cases beginners mistakes. They are easy to keep or breed provided they are housed properly and in a fashion that makes them feel secure.

We have always kept them in groups of 4-6 frogs per vivarium, most of which are 16" cubes or similar. Try to keep plantings towards the rear of vivarium with open areas covered in layers of leaf litter towards the front. Don't be afraid to add some moss either, they will as happily pick amongst the tufts or mats of moss for inverts as they will the leaf litter. We replenish leaf litter as it decomposes so they have a fairly continual access of "fresh" litter which they will skitter around amongst, and often breed in. They are as happy breeding in curled leaf litter as anywhere else, there is no need to add additional bowers, though it does make collection of eggs easier. The males are diligent, and it is a very rewarding site to see the little guy carrying 2 or 3 tads. They can breed as early as 10 months of age.

Rather than dumping a tonne of microfauna to seed the tanks, we try to feed them frequently in small amounts. On a few occasions I have had to break tanks down due to an explosion of springtails far far beyond what the frogs would consume, and to the point where they were crawling on all surfaces, not the just the substrate, which could have become stressful for the frogs. As soon as you can get them on pinheads or flies all the better IMHO, or better yet start with some that are big enough to consume these foods.

No real secrets, just be consistent with their care and you should find them really rewarding. If you have the adults housed in a fashion that they are comfortable, you will almost certainly be rewarded with eggs.

good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Mark for your detailed response! I just put a order with you last week for some of these guys. I was planning to separate them into 2 pairs but if you think they will do well as a group in a 18" cube. I might try that as my first option and prepare for the worst incase fighting occurs. I hate to bother you but could you spare a picture of your 16" cube? I am trying to get a idea on how define the territories are. Thanks again! _Dillon
 

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Hey Dillon,

I have had really good success with my Understory Retics (thanks Mark) in a 37ish gallon Hex.
Here is a few pics of their Viv. As far as their care, what Mark said... haha







 

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Hey Mark what ratio are you keeping your groups in?
 

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Hi Dillon,
We have kept and bred reticulata pretty consistently for about 8 years now. I think the problems people get into with them are based around the fact that they are a little more unforgiving than other species to what some might term benign neglect, or in certain cases beginners mistakes. They are easy to keep or breed provided they are housed properly and in a fashion that makes them feel secure.

We have always kept them in groups of 4-6 frogs per vivarium, most of which are 16" cubes or similar. Try to keep plantings towards the rear of vivarium with open areas covered in layers of leaf litter towards the front. Don't be afraid to add some moss either, they will as happily pick amongst the tufts or mats of moss for inverts as they will the leaf litter. We replenish leaf litter as it decomposes so they have a fairly continual access of "fresh" litter which they will skitter around amongst, and often breed in. They are as happy breeding in curled leaf litter as anywhere else, there is no need to add additional bowers, though it does make collection of eggs easier. The males are diligent, and it is a very rewarding site to see the little guy carrying 2 or 3 tads. They can breed as early as 10 months of age.

Rather than dumping a tonne of microfauna to seed the tanks, we try to feed them frequently in small amounts. On a few occasions I have had to break tanks down due to an explosion of springtails far far beyond what the frogs would consume, and to the point where they were crawling on all surfaces, not the just the substrate, which could have become stressful for the frogs. As soon as you can get them on pinheads or flies all the better IMHO, or better yet start with some that are big enough to consume these foods.

No real secrets, just be consistent with their care and you should find them really rewarding. If you have the adults housed in a fashion that they are comfortable, you will almost certainly be rewarded with eggs.

good luck!
i have read they like hot temperatures, can they still tolerate the night drop around 70ºF ?
 
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