Dendroboard banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to get rid of the annoying "flash" I get in most pix where the reflection off of the frogs moist skin makes a bright "flash" on the frog. This was taken with the flash pointing straight up and it is reduced but the image seems a little dark and the background is gone. I guess it's not too bad of an effect. Maybe I need to try with one of those things Kyle had mentioned that covers the flash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
696 Posts
I think it's a great pic!!!
I used to encounter the same problem with underwater pics. I needed to get the flash further away from the camera. I used a long synch cord to angle the flash where ever, however I wanted. This coupled with a diffuser allowed me to get the results I wanted. I found a similar set up for my land camera, waiting on the developing.
Now with a dig camera you can be more flexible and take many more pics. I shoot three at a time now. Not bracketing but more compensating when not using a tripod.
I think lighting towards the back of your subject and using the flash from the side would make a huge difference in the background while still lighting your subject.
Just my 2 cents.
 
G

·
Nice picture Robb.
I have an Omni Bounce made by Stofen. Something else that will help is a Circular Polarizer. Also try and take a picture of the frog when it is more dry, as wet skin reflects the light too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,229 Posts
I have found a polarizer is very tough to use with flash, as you will need to stay at the same angle. The other problem is that you may still get a reflection from the lights in the tank when trying that. The best way I have found to reduce the glare is to always take them at a little bit of a angle.

I had planned on ordering a flash bracket last night, but the one I want it seems everyone is out of...
 
G

·
Not trying to hi-jack the thread, but while on the subject, can somebody recommand a good "flash muffler" (light box?)? I have a Nikon D100 with a SB-50DX that casts really sharp/dark shaow when taking indoor picture, even when it's pointed up. I looked at the link and it's compatible with:

Omni-Bounce OM-SB5 19.95 Add to Cart
Two-Way Bounce Unit TW-UNI 19.95 Add to Cart
Green and Gold Set OC-SBSET 29.95 Add to Cart
Green Omni-Bounce OC-SBGR 17.95 Add to Cart
Gold Omni-Bounce OC-SBGL 17.95 Add to Cart
Two-Way Adapter TW-UNIA 3.00

Unfortunately with no info at all on the website, I am not quite sure what to get...

Sorry again for butting in!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
I really like that picture. It has a ton of detail in it...you can see the texture on the skin so well you can almost feel it.

How do you like that Sigma macro? I'm torn between the Sigma and the new Tamron 90mm macro for my Nikon D70.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I like the Sigma so far, but it's the only real macro lens I've used. I've taken some of my best frog pictures with it. Previously I was using a Sigma 24-70 and although they were ok the macro lens just does the job so much better. The Tamron got great reviews from what I have heard. I'd like to try the Canon 100mm macro to see if I can notice any real difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
cross polarization

Wet subjects pose problems due to the highly reflective nature of water. One way to get around it is to use a "cross polarization technique". This entails a polarizing filter on the lense and each of the flashes you use. All the poarizing filters need to be angled correctly to get the desired effect (wet subject, with fewer hot spots from the wet areas).

This technique works very well and is used when photographing not only wet subjects, but other reflective subjects like minerals and gems.

As to macro lenses, I have both Canon EF 100 macros (the old one at home and the new USM one at work). I have also shot with the Tamron MF, Minolta MF & AF as well as the Nikon MF & AF (owned a lot of cameras and lenses over the years). I love the new Canon EF 100 USM - beautiful focusing compared to everything else out there. Optically, these are all comparable. Some of them will not go 1:1 on their own (need extension tubes or converters). One of the huge advantages with the Canons is the ability to use teleconverters (with extension tube), so you can get a 140mm f4 macro (EF 1.4X), and a 200mm f5.6 macro (EF 2X).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,799 Posts
BTW Robb that is a realy good pic, I wish! Great detail and i realy like how he is up on that, just reminds me of when they always show preditors searching for prey on large stones etc.



Ryan
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top