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Hello, my name is Boris. I am a dedicated fish keeper for many years and for an year a Dendrobates enthusiast. I Got my terrarium with two D. Tinctorius for an year more as an accident and it took a long time with some technical problems until I upgrade/finish the terrarium. Until then the frogs were kept in a temporary in another one. Technical data:
Aquarium 150x50x60h cm. backgrounders from styrofoam, formed in roots, covered with silikon and peat/cocofiber. Lianes from rope. Substrat: 5cm clayballs, mesh, And above mixture from peat, soil, Lava Rock cocofibre, bark. On top leaf litter. Light in the Aquarium , 2 18w LED lamps tropical and color forms. They are in my opinion away from the walls, so the frogs don‘t get close. On the cover there are holes for ventilation in the front and back and Inhaber 2 fans on the top cover, also away from the walls. They run for 15 min every 2h. Rain system with 9 doses 3xday for 20-40 sec.
Decoration with magroove driftwood. Plants mainly Bromeliads and ferns. Also Orchids. On the background Moss Smoothie, layers 3 days ago.
I have two D. Tinctorius according to the seller 1.1 but I am not sure.

I will be happy to hear some comments and advices.

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Nice shots and beautiful vivarium! For the moss on the walls (eg, first photo, top right), do you have a misting setup that hits it directly / indirect high ambient humidity to keep it alive?
 

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Nice shots and beautiful vivarium! For the moss on the walls (eg, first photo, top right), do you have a misting setup that hits it directly / indirect high ambient humidity to keep it alive?
The misting doses are set in two rows and the second one hits the background. Not 100% but dedicated for the Moss. How often and how long should it be? The humidity is around 90-100%. But you are right, the Moss is my concern.
 

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I think your reported humidity is a little high for dart frogs, at least constantly at those levels. To get those levels of humidity your ventilation is probably insufficient, for frogs, and for many species of plants (again at those constant levels) long term. I've noticed my tanks where moss thrives has a little higher humidity, but still some air circulation. Certainly not wet. Wet and that level of humidity without air circulation is more conducive to algae growth than moss. As in algae may outcompete. Put humidity and air circulation at the right levels and you will have nice moss growth. It won't carpet, but will take over in the appropriate areas and looks quite natural.

I agree with everyone else though. Tank looks amazing! Love the leaf litter the most. Nice and airy layer for hiding and microfauna.
 

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I think your reported humidity is a little high for dart frogs, at least constantly at those levels. To get those levels of humidity your ventilation is probably insufficient, for frogs, and for many species of plants (again at those constant levels) long term. I've noticed my tanks where moss thrives has a little higher humidity, but still some air circulation. Certainly not wet. Wet and that level of humidity without air circulation is more conducive to algae growth than moss. As in algae may outcompete. Put humidity and air circulation at the right levels and you will have nice moss growth. It won't carpet, but will take over in the appropriate areas and looks quite natural.

I agree with everyone else though. Tank looks amazing! Love the leaf litter the most. Nice and airy layer for hiding and microfauna.
Well, I have read some threads of people having 100% humidity all of the time. One of those I remember reading years ago was GRIMM`S Peninsula. Yes, I have little ventilation, but I have air circulation. In the descriptopn of D. tinctorius in a book I have it stays clearly that the humidity is above 80% in their habitat all of the time. Anyway, it would not be a problem to reduce it. I just wanted to give a better chance to the moss at the beginning.
 

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I need some help sexing the frogs. I do not think they are male and female, rather same sex. But wich?
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Hello, my name is Boris. I am a dedicated fish keeper for many years and for an year a Dendrobates enthusiast. I Got my terrarium with two D. Tinctorius for an year more as an accident and it took a long time with some technical problems until I upgrade/finish the terrarium. Until then the frogs were kept in a temporary in another one. Technical data:
Aquarium 150x50x60h cm. backgrounders from styrofoam, formed in roots, covered with silikon and peat/cocofiber. Lianes from rope. Substrat: 5cm clayballs, mesh, And above mixture from peat, soil, Lava Rock cocofibre, bark. On top leaf litter. Light in the Aquarium , 2 18w LED lamps tropical and color forms. They are in my opinion away from the walls, so the frogs don‘t get close. On the cover there are holes for ventilation in the front and back and Inhaber 2 fans on the top cover, also away from the walls. They run for 15 min every 2h. Rain system with 9 doses 3xday for 20-40 sec.
Decoration with magroove driftwood. Plants mainly Bromeliads and ferns. Also Orchids. On the background Moss Smoothie, layers 3 days ago.
I have two D. Tinctorius according to the seller 1.1 but I am not sure.

I will be happy to hear some comments and advices.

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Nice Viv, gorgeous frogs. I love that lightening blue soap sud looking underbelly. My frogs, Ranitomeya amazonica 'Iquitos' have the same underbelly coloring. They are only about .5” long. Yours are obviously much larger. I’d guess at least 1”. I’ll add a pic of my Viv. Unfortunately the frogs are the definition of shy. I grew the simulated canopy for them to feel safe, they do come down to hunt, but mostly they hide in the canopy. The pond has orange starburst, and fire red shrimp (breeding population) about 30-40, rams horn snails, Malaysian trumpets. And 2 guppies. Can’t put more fish cuz the volume is around 4-5 gallons. If you are interested I’ll send specs, this enclosure is almost 3 years old. The frogs are just barely older than that cuz I let the setup mature and cycle before adding them. Had early fungus and mold issues. All cleared out now. I think your frogs look bright and healthy. No Vivarium starts without issues. I had a waterfall feature I wound up abandoning. It was also the water filter so I had to compensate for that loss.


Good luck Boris. This is a very rewarding hobby. One thing I’ve learned is to leave the enclosure alone so it can balance itself out. Same with planted tanks, they require a certain amount of benign neglect to stabilize and flourish. One guarantee is that nature won’t do what you want it to, so your plans will have to change based on what the enclosure does. You are a keeper, not a controller imo.


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Hello, my name is Boris. I am a dedicated fish keeper for many years and for an year a Dendrobates enthusiast. I Got my terrarium with two D. Tinctorius for an year more as an accident and it took a long time with some technical problems until I upgrade/finish the terrarium. Until then the frogs were kept in a temporary in another one. Technical data:
Aquarium 150x50x60h cm. backgrounders from styrofoam, formed in roots, covered with silikon and peat/cocofiber. Lianes from rope. Substrat: 5cm clayballs, mesh, And above mixture from peat, soil, Lava Rock cocofibre, bark. On top leaf litter. Light in the Aquarium , 2 18w LED lamps tropical and color forms. They are in my opinion away from the walls, so the frogs don‘t get close. On the cover there are holes for ventilation in the front and back and Inhaber 2 fans on the top cover, also away from the walls. They run for 15 min every 2h. Rain system with 9 doses 3xday for 20-40 sec.
Decoration with magroove driftwood. Plants mainly Bromeliads and ferns. Also Orchids. On the background Moss Smoothie, layers 3 days ago.
I have two D. Tinctorius according to the seller 1.1 but I am not sure.

I will be happy to hear some comments and advices.

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Sorry, I’ll add another thought. Hydrometers are not always that accurate. If you are running the misters that often it’s probably too much. I think a good rate if your house is about 40-50 rh and the enclosure is low to mid 70s you should expect the enclosure condensation to dry about 70% before the next mist cycle. The frogs like 70-75F, and 75-100% humidity. Too high humidity can cause respiratory issues for them. I use a fan, misters, a fogger, and heaters. The heaters are mostly to control temp but since I have 4” of water in the base it has a major impact on humidity. Obviously you want to make sure the enclosure doesn’t drop too low, 50% or lower will literally turn the guys into frog jerky (pardon my comparison, not from personal experience). I’d get a good hydrometer, I aim for 72-75F and 80-90%. Getting that balance down is really tricky. Sorry for so many posts. Maybe name one of your frogs Boris too.


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Sorry, I’ll add another thought. Hydrometers are not always that accurate. If you are running the misters that often it’s probably too much. I think a good rate if your house is about 40-50 rh and the enclosure is low to mid 70s you should expect the enclosure condensation to dry about 70% before the next mist cycle. The frogs like 70-75F, and 75-100% humidity. Too high humidity can cause respiratory issues for them. I use a fan, misters, a fogger, and heaters. The heaters are mostly to control temp but since I have 4” of water in the base it has a major impact on humidity. Obviously you want to make sure the enclosure doesn’t drop too low, 50% or lower will literally turn the guys into frog jerky (pardon my comparison, not from personal experience). I’d get a good hydrometer, I aim for 72-75F and 80-90%. Getting that balance down is really tricky. Sorry for so many posts. Maybe name one of your frogs Boris too.


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I have the humidity high only because of the moss. Not the frogs I never had it below 60. I thought they do not mind 100%. The problems that could come with high humidity is the temperature, and if it is too hot the frogs canot cool. But now in winter I am more on the low side of Temperature between 22 and 27 max. depending on where I measure. So that's why the humidity didn't worry me. Correct me if I am wrong. Later, when the moss starts growing, I would reduce the humidity. It is now high not because of misting, but because of the heater in the bo
ttom.
Mz kids named the frogs allready.
 

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I prefer always to give captive animals choices whenever possible, so they can seek out their preferred (or, necessary) conditions, since I can't know exactly what they need. For frogs, this involves among many other things giving moisture choices: wetter areas, drier areas, more and less humid areas.

There is always a wetter, 100% humid place in a viv (behind and under hardscape and plants), so it is up to me to make sure that there is always a choice of drier places (not just one such place, since a frog may not go to it because it is occupied or too hot or too bright or whatever) such as dry leaf litter and areas in the viv with substantial ventilation where the humidity is at the low end of any possible range they might prefer, or need.

Given that air circulation in captivity is many times lower than in the wild, running moisture levels lower is a safer bet. I haven't read of a case where a dart was thought to have desiccated in a viv merely because of low humidity; if they have a moist place to retreat to, low humidity is not a health issue.
 
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