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Hey Zach can we get some more information about the blue foots? This is the first time I have heard about them.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sean Stewart has brought them in from Europe a couple times in the past 15-20 years. Apparently, they are fairly difficult to breed. They are just another locale of leucomelas. In person, they're pretty amazing looking.
 

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Are they for sure another morph or possibly just a color variation?awsome viv by the way
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My understanding is that it is thought they represent a different population. They have come into the United States before, but in very small numbers, and have never really 'taken hold' over here.
 

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My understanding is that it is thought they represent a different population. They have come into the United States before, but in very small numbers, and have never really 'taken hold' over here.



I have heard rumors that a almost red variation of leuc exists( not sure where thought)do you know if that may be true?
 

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Those blue footed leucs are pretty awesome, I must say.

-Troy
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have heard rumors that a almost red variation of leuc exists( not sure where thought)do you know if that may be true?
I've seen very orange leucs, but not red ones. It wouldn't surprise me, though - there are a lot of variations in leucs out there (much like D. tinctorius, the differences are just more subtle).
 

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Thanks Zach that's what I was looking for! Keep us updated on how these guys do for you. Kinda makes you wonder if you put them in a large heavily planted tank and throw bugs at them every once in a while, but don't look at them too hard if they would do well and reproduce.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The 18x18x24 exo they're in has a ton of surface area and hiding places. It consists mostly of small limestone boulders with tons of cracks and crevices for them to utilize. I tend to have luck with the other forms of D. leucomelas, so here's hoping they do well for me.

One wall of my frogroom is my 'seasonal wall', where temps vary naturally both from day-night, as well as winter-summer. All of the vivs on this wall are also on their own misting system, so it makes it easy to cycle the darts. My Brazilian Yellow Heads and Fine Spot leucs didn't take off until I started keeping them seasonally. Hopefully it works well for the blue foots.
 

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Tank looks great Zach. Would you mind explaining how you set up their tank with the limestone boulders? Did you silicone them in place at all? I'm thinking about giving it a try, it looks good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hey Chris,

I just did a typical hydroton false bottom, then put the boulders in place until I liked the way they looked. I used dabs of silicone to bind most of the heavier ones together, but left the top ones disconnected (they act like lids, allowing me to get into the cracks if I ever need to remove a frog). I backfilled some of the area with a bit of long fiber sphagnum, and was pretty happy with the results.
 

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Hey Zach,

Good luck with these guys! Please do keep us posted on them. =) I'm sorry I missed out on 'em, and would love to see them get established over here.

Best,
Ash
 

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"The leucs do differ in appearance geographically. The standard yellow banded leucs are from Venezuela and the banded leucs are from British Guyana. The green foot bloodline in the USA are ones from Charles Nishihara and a few other iitially imported in the late 1990's. They are actually blue foot leucs that faded to green after a few generations of captive breeding. Currently in the hobby, the ones that are from this line have very little foot color at all, but it is a distinct locale. The small spot leucs are also a distinct locale same with the green banded leucomelas." Sean Stewart
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I know the green foots I'm working with were actually imported into the US in 1995 from Venezuela, and did not display blue feet at all (even the WCs). There pattern differs from the blue foots as well.
I have heard that the 'green foots' in Europe either descended from blue foot animals and lost their colors, or the result of a blue foot x standard leuc cross.
 

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My understanding is that it is thought they represent a different population. They have come into the United States before, but in very small numbers, and have never really 'taken hold' over here.
Good luck with these.
Hopefully they breed for you and we can have a chance of getting some from you in the future!! (I know I would take some!! :) )

Steve
 

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Beautiful frogs Zach...somehow I knew you would be getting them! Best of luck with them, if anyone can get them breeding its you.
-Field
P.S. Keep me in mind when you get good froglets:)
 

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They are sweet Zach......

So "blue foots" are "green foots" before they became green foot? Is that what I am understanding?

I wonder if there is anything that can be supplimented to help keep the blue?...
 
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