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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
long story short. our basement flooded.(frog are down there) we are going to have to use a harsh bleach on the walls.(i hope nothing near my tanks)

my question is since i can't move some of the tanks. what's the best way to cover them up from the smell? also a dumb question is do i have to move the frogs them self? i'm thinking yes but would like to see what other have to say. moost all the tanks are sealed shut so don't have to worry that much with the smell getting in.

last question is i have a turrtle and fish. i can't move. the fish will the smell get to them? and for the map turttle. should i move him or just cover the cage.

i'm hoping most of the bleach will not be near my tanks at all but who know yet. any sugestion would be great
 

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I'm no expert but here's my two cents.

You have to pull them. Amphibians are extremely susceptable to any chemicals (fumes or otherwise) due to the osmotic properties (for lack of a better term) of their skin.

In addition, nothing kills fish quicker than clorine bleach.

Whatever it takes, get your frogs and fish out of there. Tape all tanks up AIR TIGHT with trash bags and then do what you have to do.

After the room is completely aired out, remove the coverings and immediately bag, seal, and remove.

All this applies to the turtles as well.
 

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Hi, This happened to me this year too and it sucks. My advice would be to pull them until the smell is gone. Its alot cheaper than having to replace them. Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I can move the frogs and turrles but not the fish. only thing is i can't move there tanks. i understand i need to tarp down the tanks. but is there something else them bleach i can use to kill the mold that is better for my pets. was thinking borax. anyone else have any info on this?
 

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I pulled this from the CDC website:


CDC - Mold - General Information - Basic Facts

How can people decrease mold exposure?

Sensitive individuals should avoid areas that are likely to have mold, such as compost piles, cut grass, and wooded areas. Inside homes, mold growth can be slowed by keeping humidity levels between 40% and 60%, and ventilating showers and cooking areas. If there is mold growth in your home, you should clean up the mold and fix the water problem. Mold growth can be removed from hard surfaces with commercial products, soap and water, or a bleach solution of no more than 1 cup of bleach in 1 gallon of water.

If you choose to use bleach to clean up mold:

Never mix bleach with ammonia or other household cleaners. Mixing bleach with ammonia or other cleaning products will produce dangerous, toxic fumes.
Open windows and doors to provide fresh air.
Wear non-porous gloves and protective eye wear.
If the area to be cleaned is more than 10 square feet, consult the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guide titled Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings. Although focused on schools and commercial buildings, this document also applies to other building types. You can get it by going to the EPA web site at http://www.epa.gov/mold/mold_remediation.htmlExternal Web Site Icon.
Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions when using bleach or any other cleaning product.
Says you can use soap and water.
 

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What I've was told about mold is you don't want to use bleach. Bleach will kill the mold but it leaves behind a residue that actually feeds mold. I was told to use a Sporicidin. You will have to do some research on the effects of animals but I don't believe it is as harsh as bleach.
 
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