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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:) hi, everyone...

i currently breed various Blattid species for feeding the Hylids, Bufos, Rhacs, and the like which i also work with... [no A. domestica (crickets) here. can't stand those bloody things!] one species in particular i work with is a small Bufonid, Ingerophrynus parvus, [vernacular = "Dwarf Malaysian Forest Toad"] which are roughly the size of some of the larger animals in the tinctorius taxon. the primary food source for my I. parvus are Blatta lateralis stage #1 instars [nymphs.] therefore, i assumed my D. tinctorius could also be fed in a similar manner.

around once a month, i collect about 60% - 70% of the B. lateralis egg cases from their breeding enclosure [LOL, and still get phenomenal population growth!], and rear them separately in a small plastic shoe box. i throw in a few scalloped pieces of cardboard, and when i need some, i simply pick up a few pieces of the cardboard, and shake them off into my feeding cup... it's a very efficient process overall [for those who don't know, B. lateralis stage #1 nymphs are only slightly larger than D. hydei.]

while i'm certainly no stranger to anura, and most certainly no stranger to the kingdom animalia as a whole, [my primary focus was native marine invertebrate phyla] i only recently began working with various Dendrobatid species. one of the first animals i acquired was, of course, was D. tinctorius [Suriname Cobalt - i was told the line recently, but forgot.] i acquired the animal at approximately 3 months OTW, and fed it primarily Drosphilia for the first few weeks. i then decided to try some lateralis instars. he did give them a shot... however, afterward he seemed even more prone to simply ignore them altogether..

i placed a homemade lateralis trap into the tinc enclosure, and collected the lateralis which were not eaten. i decided to give it another month or two, and try again. i had previously read somewhere that D. tinctorius can be a bit picky, and more prone to eating smaller food items for it's relative size... than say Phyllobates terribilis, etc.

well, the other day i noticed him doing some serious hunting out of the corner of my eye.. which was odd, because when i fed him his morning meal, i watched him eat virtually every fly i deposited in the tank. he was definitely stalking something.. [lol, and he was doing it such vigor!] i took a peek, and he was hunting [as well as greedily devouring] the few remaining lateralis which i was unable to re-capture!

:) great news!! ....as this yields even more variation in his diet, and another readily available feeder for him. he now no longer favors Drosphilia over B. laterlais so far as i can tell.

i was simply wondering how many other DB members use this method, or something relatively similar for feeding some of their larger Dendrobatids? :) thanks a lot for sticking with the "longish" post!! have a great day!

P.S:
[FYI: Ingerophrynus parvus are quite literally amazing [and really fun!] animals to work with, should anyone happen to be interested. these guys make great small, "dart-like" captives, and are quite similar [if not virtually identical] to some of the more terrestrial Dendrobatids in a convergent evolutionary sense... same set-up, occupy same niche, similar morphology / anatomy, active during same photo-period [diurnal,] etc... captive environmental parameters are thus also virtually identical. this animal, in my opinion, most definitely deserves a second glace / closer look by the hobby.]
 

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The Turkestan roaches are outstanding for darts. The egg cases just make it even easier!

I do pretty much the same thing as you, with the same results. I love the Turks because
they're great for any animal that eat small prey, and especially baby geckos. A great
source of protein, and for their size, much easier to gutload than virtually any other feeder
we use for darts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hi, Brock!

nice to meet another frogger from the great NW!

i couldn't agree more with your statement on gut-loading, and i'm glad that you mentioned it. my early attempts at gut-loading Drosphilia should have been referred to as, "How to Effectively Drown Drosphilia in Freshly Squeezed Orange Juice For Dummies!"

many factors make this species an ideal feeder for anurans of various families, and of various sizes. i'll not bore people with the long list of benefits of breeding blattids as feeders, as most experienced hobbyists are already familiar with these facts. i will, however, keep making the argument for feeding larger Dendrobatids the stage 1's. they're a fantastic feeder which are mind-numbingly easy to yield in large numbers.

remember, variation in diet is paramount, and directly proportional to a captive's acute, and chronic health. there's no way we can even come close to replicating the variation in diet an animal would have in it's indigenous environment [hence the importance of supplementation, and the attempt at using numerous species as feeders when possible.]

in fact, to further my point, if there are any members here who are seriously interested in the above, i'd be happy to send some fresh oothica via snail mail to you so that you can give the species a test drive, so to speak! :)
 
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