Dendroboard banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Planning on getting a couple darts, not exactly sure which yet. But I tend to keep my house cold so will need a heater. I'm seeing really conflicting information about the best way to heat it. I'm planning for a false bottom with Leca, then dirt and plants and whatnot.

I already have a heat pad so that would be the cheapest; just need to get a Thermostat. Some say the bottom is best but if you have too much stuff on the bottom, then no. How much "stuff" is too much stuff for the heater to work correctly?

Then there's overhead heating too. One site said those are good but another said not for frogs but didn't say why.

What's the best option?

also bonus question, any tips on keeping the fly cultures warm too?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
How cold is “cold”? Is it “cold” all year round? Just seasonal?

I don’t keep frogs so, I’m not sure what temps are best. If you could provide more info regarding your temps, other members will more than likely chime in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How cold is “cold”? Is it “cold” all year round? Just seasonal?

I don’t keep frogs so, I’m not sure what temps are best. If you could provide more info regarding your temps, other members will more than likely chime in.

Winter I keep it around 65-68. Summers I may need to move the frogs to the basement as the upstairs might get too hot. On a really cold day it might reach 62 downstairs, although generally closer to 65-70. But new england so temperature swings are pretty common. Oh and if I leave the windows open during the summer it might drop to the low 60s.

What I've read is 70-80 is ideal for the frogs, with dips to 65 are okay at night. But keeping them constantly at 65 doesn't seem like a good idea

Plus I'm thinking about keeping the fly cultures in the basement
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
984 Posts
Winter I keep it around 65-68. Summers I may need to move the frogs to the basement as the upstairs might get too hot. On a really cold day it might reach 62 downstairs, although generally closer to 65-70. But new england so temperature swings are pretty common. Oh and if I leave the windows open during the summer it might drop to the low 60s.

What I've read is 70-80 is ideal for the frogs, with dips to 65 are okay at night. But keeping them constantly at 65 doesn't seem like a good idea

Plus I'm thinking about keeping the fly cultures in the basement
I think you will have more trouble with your fruit fly cultures than your frogs. Those temperatures seem fine for frogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I keep my house the same and run AC in summer, my tank stays between 68 the lowest to 74 the highest throughout the year. Tank was setup in march and i haven't had any issues with temp. My flies are in a vented clear storage tub that can hold 8 32oz cultures and i use a under tank heater glued to one side of it to keep it heated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
It looks like you have a solution but for those searching that may not, here are some of the difficulties if you are not heating the whole room.

undertank heaters have to fight through your drainage layer and substrate layer. On most tanks this is several inches thick. In addition, they are heating the water in the drainage layer. This greatly increases the humidity in the tank. You end up misting less to compensate and the drainage reservoir will be evaporated off. You now have lost the stabilizing effect of the water and the tank will go super dry betweenmisting. You also limit how deep your leaf litter can be and substrate both of which are good to have.
So if the bottom is out, what about the back? Undertank heaters on a back or side don’t typically work because most people coat their backs with insulating spray foam. This stuff is designed to keep heat out or in, so the mat becomes useless.
Ceramic heat bulbs above the tank are an option, but would need to go above a screen section rather than over glass. Usually people only have a small amount of screening.
A light can increase temps depending on the type but would be a constant heat source rather than adjusting to the temp of the room (unless you want the light dimming and brightening based on temperature). This can only work then in a fairly stable room temp.
A water heater in the drainage water has the same humidity increasing effects as the undertank mat listed above.
So there are lots of challenges. No one is saying it can’t be done, but heating the room is the simplest. In addition, a cold room with a warm glass box will make for no visible areas that aren’t covered in condensation a lot of the time.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top