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Best beginner dart?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At the request of Ryan I have decided to start a poll. Everyone feel free to chime in.

Thanks!

Justin
 
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I think the best beginner is a few books and a visit to a breeders house. After that there are very few that a person would not be ready for. The larger spp are a nice buffer for a few mistakes, but the small ones aren't any harder if conditions are right.
j
 

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I agree with Justin. Check out all the websites, research for a few months, get used to raising flies, etc.. Build you're Viv...and get the frogs you really want...Make sure they are captive bred though (for a first frog).
 

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I voted for leucs because of their call, and they arent shy. But all thoose are good starter frogs, except maybe the vents because mine seem a bit on the shy side. The most important thing is a frog that will keep the hobbyist interest so they dont get bored and forget about the frogs.
 

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Mine are out and about some of the time, but they arent nearly as bold as some of the tincs, azureus, or terribilis.
 
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poll_best dart frog for beginner

Being I am a beginner (2 months), I really shouldn't be in this poll, however I did select D. leucomelas.

These are also the frogs I have.

Reasons for my choice:
[Size]: not to big, yet not to small (my interest is thumbnails after getting more experience).
[Boldness]: wanted a frog that wasn't going to be to shy! (I have several specie of shy frogs. None darts)
[Group]: wanted as a first dart frog a specie that I didn't have to worry about females fighting or males fighting in small groups.
[Color]: D. leucomelas have a bold color combo with nice patterns. They also stand out in the vivarium.
[Vertical and Horizonal Space]: They will climb as well as use the ground.
[Availability/Cost ratio]: they are readily available for a reasonable cost. (I don't think I could bring myself to start with a rare or endanger specie for example, no matter how much I think I might want the specie, even researching in great detail. Doing is always going to present unkowns no matter how well one prepares, IMHO)
 

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I can't really say either, as I've had my first darts for only a matter of weeks. Both are D. azureus, and I think they make great beginner frogs, bold, beautiful colors, hardy, and good-sized. I have heard good things about the other species listed in the polls as well. If anything, I would probably steer beginners away from the shyer species. I would think that'd be a good way to kill one's interest in this fascinating hobby. What fun is it to build up your hopes, only to get frogs that you're never going to see. I say save the shyer species for later when the keeper has had a little more experience under their belt, JMHO.

Bry
 
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Well my first darts where auratus, very cool frogs for being green and black. Got rid of my orginal pair long ago, with in a month I had more. I just missed them that much.
All the frogs listed are great frogs to start with, but I chose terribilis. You can't call them shy. The biggest reason I would say these guys is because of the number one reason beginners have problems with darts, culturing flies. These guys will eat bigger sized food than almost anything else, so you can run down to the local pet store and get crickets, when your cultures get mites, mold over, ect ect.
Tincs and Azureus are big frogs that like little food, so the eat a lot of flies.
Leucs are cool, and do have a nice call. Ours are not that shy, but not as bold as terribilis.
Overall, get a CB is a must for the first time dart keeper, and little back ground info.:)
 

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YAY! I think this will help keep repeats of posts at a minimum.

I voted for leucs, i havent had personal experience with them, but i heard wonders. Their call is one of the main things so they will beable to be sexed easily at maturity, and i hear they are pretty bold.

Also my auratus are very bold, they are always out in the open, but the bad part is i think i have 2 males :x

Ryan
 
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Id say Cobaly tincs, im not an expert but mine have been eating like pigs so far. :) Id say its best to go to the breeders house or to go to a reptile expo... if u dont get them yourself, the FedEx people will kill them because of shaking them up, turning em over to see what they are, or dropping them. I had a Fedex person drop my acropora corals and there dead! :evil:
 
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Id say Cobaly tincs, im not an expert but mine have been eating like pigs so far. :) Id say its best to go to the breeders house or to go to a reptile expo... if u dont get them yourself, the FedEx people will kill them because of shaking them up, turning em over to see what they are, or dropping them. I had a Fedex person drop my acropora corals and there dead! :evil:
 
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Hey Dendro kid can you not use my picture with out my permission =P

Seriously thats my avatar and my picture. Its just annoying to see someone else using it for an avatar (and confusing).

My apologies if its a dendroboard hiccup.


-Tad
 

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E. tricolor will always be my favorite beginner frog. When I started out all the books that mentioned dart frogs said E. tricolor (they were a bit old, tricolor had already dropped from the hobby). I guess now I'd have to say I technically started with E. anthonyi but thats a whole 'nother thread.

These guys do well in groups (I always had mine in groups), they can be very bright, bold, eat everything (even tho they are small frogs hydei is a favorite)..... appetites of phyllobates basically. They were forgiving about humidity too. I think the 'santa isabels' are poster frogs for darts.

While I don't keep phyllobates, I'd have to say bicolor/terribilis are my second recomendation for those who want larger frogs.
 
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i voted for auratus, just because i had a pair of G&Bs that were wonderful for my first pair. they were my first small frog. i got them as froglets, and they were very forgiving. i guess im voting for them because all the research i did (including $$$) led me to believe they were the best for me to start with. after keeping mantellas and some other fly-eaters im glad i started with those guys.

im here on this board researching ideas for a new start, as i lost all of my frogs in one fail swoop of power loss over the summer :(. i was given an 80 gallon 5x1x2 foot tank that i think will be perfect for a small colony, so here we go again.

landon
 

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In addition to all these, I'd say learn what your favorite color is... As corny as this may sound, people do in fact have different color preferences...

If you get the right frogs (color), you are more likely to pay attention. Which would hopefully encourage you to give the proper husbandry, asking the right questions and on your way to become a frog jedi...


SB
 

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My vote would be for any of the Phyllobates for one simple reason. They will eat crickets. That means that if a beginner winds up in a pickle with a crashed ff culture, then they can run to the local pet store and get crickets or waxworms to get them by.

I don't think I would even include vents on the list. Not that they are hard to keep, but successfully breeding them and morphing the tads can be a challenge. When I think of beginner frog, I don't think simply having a frog easy to maintain cuts it. Maintaining frogs can get boring and lead to a short stay in the hobby. Seeing those first froglets morph out can get a new hobbyist hooked for life. So for a thumbnail, I would go with something like imitator. Any of the other frogs listed are good though.
 
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