Dendroboard banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Nothing (well, I have fish, but I don't think that's what this is asking)
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all!
I am a complete beginner when it comes to Dart Frogs, but I'm interested and willing to research/learn. I was wondering what the best beginner Dart Frog is and how to care for them. I would like to do a bioactive enclosure from the start since I feel that those are my thing because I have a ton of planted aquariums. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
Welcome aboard.

The most typically recommended beginner species are:
Dendrobates leucomelas
Dendrobates tinctorius
Dendrobates auratus

As far as care goes, there's a caresheet sub forum on here with some, albeit dated, caresheets.
 

·
Registered
Nothing (well, I have fish, but I don't think that's what this is asking)
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Welcome aboard.

The most typically recommended beginner species are:
Dendrobates leucomelas
Dendrobates tinctorius
Dendrobates auratus

As far as care goes, there's a caresheet sub forum on here with some, albeit dated, caresheets.
I really like Dendrobates leucomelas and Dendrobates tinctorius. What humidity do those frogs need? Also, would dart frogs benefit from a small pond/body of water in their enclosure? I'm going to do a bioactive enclosure...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
I really like Dendrobates leucomelas and Dendrobates tinctorius. What humidity do those frogs need? Also, would dart frogs benefit from a small pond/body of water in their enclosure? I'm going to do a bioactive enclosure...
60-80% humidity is generally regarded as ideal.

No dart frogs need a water body/pond in their enclosures. None of my tanks have one.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,309 Posts
I'm going to try putting the humidity recommendations this way from now on:

"A properly planted, adequately ventilated, appropriately misted dart frog viv will tend to have daily variations from 60-80% humidity."

Set up and maintained properly, humidity never needs to be measured -- I never do -- and chasing numbers has killed frogs. Good ventilation, a daily heavy misting session or two, a good amount of usable plant and hardscape mass, and leaf litter that dries out daily is what frogs thrive in.

And, yes, no open water. :)
 

·
Registered
Nothing (well, I have fish, but I don't think that's what this is asking)
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
60-80% humidity is generally regarded as ideal.

No dart frogs need a water body/pond in their enclosures. None of my tanks have one.
I'm going to try putting the humidity recommendations this way from now on:

"A properly planted, adequately ventilated, appropriately misted dart frog viv will tend to have daily variations from 60-80% humidity."

Set up and maintained properly, humidity never needs to be measured -- I never do -- and chasing numbers has killed frogs. Good ventilation, a daily heavy misting session or two, a good amount of usable plant and hardscape mass, and leaf litter that dries out daily is what frogs thrive in.

And, yes, no open water. :)
Ok. Thanks! Do you guys have a list of what you need to start a bioactive vivarium? I want to sorta piece together what I want so that I can see how much it'll cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
Generally speaking you'll need a substrate (search for ABG, or how to make your own), leaf litter (I use magnolia leaves), plants, water(generally, we froggers mist our tanks) springtails and Isopods. That's the basics of what you need for the tank setup. There are a ton of YouTube videos on how to set up a bioactive tank. The videos from Josh's frogs are decent (the videos on how to set up one of their bioactive kits)
 

·
Registered
Nothing (well, I have fish, but I don't think that's what this is asking)
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Generally speaking you'll need a substrate (search for ABG, or how to make your own), leaf litter (I use magnolia leaves), plants, water(generally, we froggers mist our tanks) springtails and Isopods. That's the basics of what you need for the tank setup. There are a ton of YouTube videos on how to set up a bioactive tank. The videos from Josh's frogs are decent (the videos on how to set up one of their bioactive kits)
Ok. Thanks! Where do you get plants from?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Hello There,

You can find your plants from a plethora of establishments. Online shops such as glassbox tropicals, distribution centres, your local garden supply centre or greenhouse! What you are typically looking for are plants that fall into the same kind of humidity requirements as dart frogs. There is a wonderful world of tropical plants out there that provide not only shelter and coverage for your frogs, but are aesthetically pleasing as well.

Keep in mind, once you have purchased plants, you'll want to cleanse/quarantine the plants to reduce the risk of introducing harmful pests to your vivarium. Serpa Design has a great video on Youtube showing this process, which I will link here for you at the end of this paragraph. This process may be a little tedious but some additional work goes a long way into protecting your vivarium and its inhabitants. A few moments of additional work, for months of safety :). Serpa Design Clean/Quarantine Plants Guide

Best Regards,
Nate

-Side note for moderators. I apologize if directly linking external videos is prohibited. I did not come across any forum rules that are against this.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,309 Posts
-Side note for moderators. I apologize if directly linking external videos is prohibited. I did not come across any forum rules that are against this.
No worries, as long as they are relevant, and not used by the poster as an advertisement.

A more general comment, though: videos are often used by the videomaker as an ad for their own products or clicks, and are often misleading as to best husbandry practices. The flashier channels also typically show vivaria that would be nightmares to maintain for anything less than a full-time professional keeper.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
I'm going to try putting the humidity recommendations this way from now on:

"A properly planted, adequately ventilated, appropriately misted dart frog viv will tend to have daily variations from 60-80% humidity."

Set up and maintained properly, humidity never needs to be measured -- I never do -- and chasing numbers has killed frogs. Good ventilation, a daily heavy misting session or two, a good amount of usable plant and hardscape mass, and leaf litter that dries out daily is what frogs thrive in.

And, yes, no open water. :)
This is fantastic information. The only thing I would add is that immediately following a mist, you can have brief periods where you hit 100% (just like when it rains the humidity gets very high). This should not be a situation that is allowed to persist for long periods of time, though, as it would if ventilation was inadequate.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Nothing (well, I have fish, but I don't think that's what this is asking)
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Hello There,

You can find your plants from a plethora of establishments. Online shops such as glassbox tropicals, distribution centres, your local garden supply centre or greenhouse! What you are typically looking for are plants that fall into the same kind of humidity requirements as dart frogs. There is a wonderful world of tropical plants out there that provide not only shelter and coverage for your frogs, but are aesthetically pleasing as well.

Keep in mind, once you have purchased plants, you'll want to cleanse/quarantine the plants to reduce the risk of introducing harmful pests to your vivarium. Serpa Design has a great video on Youtube showing this process, which I will link here for you at the end of this paragraph. This process may be a little tedious but some additional work goes a long way into protecting your vivarium and its inhabitants. A few moments of additional work, for months of safety :). Serpa Design Clean/Quarantine Plants Guide

Best Regards,
Nate

-Side note for moderators. I apologize if directly linking external videos is prohibited. I did not come across any forum rules that are against this.
Ok thanks! The places near me might be a bit pricy, but we'll see.

Yup I watch all his vids so I am familiar with the process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
I’d just like to add a recommendation for Phyllobates terribilis. They may be more expensive than some other frogs, but I’ve found them to be very easy and super fun to watch. They have amazing personalities and plenty of color.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,331 Posts
I’d just like to add a recommendation for Phyllobates terribilis. They may be more expensive than some other frogs, but I’ve found them to be very easy and super fun to watch. They have amazing personalities and plenty of color.
In my experciene I find Phyllobates Terribilis one of the more difficult frogs in the collection tbh..

For beginners I would always recommend Epipedobates Anthonyi. There are the boldest and most forgiving dartfrog in the hobby. They also provide a keeper with a ton of tadpoles, so they can be a good learning tool for keeping more difficult frogs later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,331 Posts
What makes them difficult? Mine seem just as easy as leucs.
The species seam to be more vunreble run into problems like nosebumps, infections and bloat when compared to other species.

I personaly find them difficult in keeping them in the perfect health for them laying continuos perfect large clutches.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
I am with Tijl. I don't find mine to be all that accident prone but I have seen numerous pictures of them where they have hurt themselves. The big thing for me is getting fertile clutches. Mine always seem to lay garbage clutches through the summer then finally get their act together when fall comes and I want to give them a break. I wonder if I am keeping them too warm in the summer and they are finally comfortable in the fall and winter. Maybe I need to take the hut out during the heat of summer. Anyway, none of my other breeders troll me this way. I think it's just spite.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Mine never have an issue with fertile clutches, but that might be because I keep them cooler for summer. I haven't experienced any of these issues, but I haven't had them for too long (only a year). I'll make sure to keep an eye on them.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top