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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to the dendro world and was just wondering which ones are the best to start out with and breed? Also it would help if you would include what conditions and what habitats they will thrive in and what I will need for breeding.

Thanks- bbboys
 

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E. anthonyi 'Santa Isabela' (aka SI's) are hardy and are very prolific. They get awesome red coloration as they age too. Here's a thread I keep for them. You can see their viv there too.

Also read the care sheets to get a sense of the husbandry and breeding habits for different frog species.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the quick response... I will look into those what would I need do breed them? also any other ideas on frogs are welcome
 

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A lot of the larger dart frogs are easier to keep, other than a few exceptions. Leucs, auratus, tincs (including azureus,) etc. are all other good beginner frogs. For the most part, breeding requirements will be generally the same for these easier frogs- give them good conditions, an adequate tank, proper food and supplementation, and they will typically do the rest. Get used to caring for them properly first, and then breeding should be relatively easy when the time comes. For tincs, usually pairs are best because of aggression; leucs and auratus can work in groups, but females may eat eggs sometimes. There is plenty of more detailed information in the care sheet sections, or on the boards here through a search, or even through other dart frog web sites. If you have any other specific questions feel free to ask, but it seems you are really excited to get breeding, which isn't a bad thing necessarily, but I suggest you don't rush it and enjoy the frogs breeding or not. You will probably get better results that way.
Bryan
 

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a lot of the bigger ones are hardy and easy to breed. D. Azureus, tinctorious, auratus, leucomelas, p. terribilis, etc are all good hardy beginner frogs, easy to care for, and not difficult to breed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What size tanks would be best for those vert or not also where are the best places to get vert kits? Would some thumbnails like imitators work for me? and what sike tank do they do well in?

Thanks-bbboys
 

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Leucs, tincs, auratus, and terribilis are all terrestrial. Have a look at the different care sheets of all the frogs (even ones not mentioned) and see which ones you like IMO, then come back with some choices and we may be able to help you better!!
Care Sheets - Dendroboard
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am interested in:
Dendrobates imitator
E. anthonyi
Dendrobates Reticulatus
Ranitomeya variabilis
Ranitomeya lamasi
Dendrobates azureus
 

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Quick google search found this: Terrestrial - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Try using the search function you will be surprised what you find. ALL the info you need is there.

Imitators are actually Ranitomeya and not Dendrobates. This was changed a while back.

Usually the thumbnails (Ranitomeya) are not best for beginners. They are much faster than the larger frogs and have less meat on them so beginner mistakes aren't handled as well.

Check out the link to the caresheets that has already been supplied to you for the azureus and then search up the rest.

I googled Epipedobates anthonyi care sheet and this was the first link: http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/ca...dobates-tricolor-e-anthonyi-intermediate.html
 

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I am interested in:
Dendrobates imitator
E. anthonyi
Dendrobates Reticulatus
Ranitomeya variabilis
Ranitomeya lamasi
Dendrobates azureus
Terrestrial means ground dwelling primarily, so standard tank set ups are best (not verts.) Arboreal would like verts and more height. All of the Ranitomeya you listed (retics, variabilis, lamasi, imitator) are more arboreal, although retics do like ground space as well. I wouldn't start with retics definitely, and lamasi are quite shy from what I've heard usually. Imitators and variabilis are more hardy for thumbnails but are still very tiny and harder, especially to breed, than easier, larger frogs such as tinctorius (such as azureus) and leucs or auratus. If breeding is a goal and you want an easier frog, I suggest you start with a larger, terrestrial species. Check out the care sheets here for species specific information.
Bryan
 

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Terrestrial means they will primarily use horizontal space as opposed to vertical.

Of the frogs you listed, I wouldn't recommend imitators, reticulatus, variabilis, or lamasi. These are all thumbnail frogs, and you really should get some experience with larger frogs before moving on to thumbnails (just a suggestion). Azureus and anthonyi would be good choices as long as you do far more research before even considering purchasing them.

I would recommend auratus as your first frog. They come in a rainbow of colors, and are very easy to care for.

Edit: It seems I was beaten to the punch on pretty much all of my suggestions. =P
 

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Be careful with a water feature, especially in a small space. They might look cool, but they are typically just a big waste of space that the frogs rarely use actually. If you really want one, get a large tank so you won't waste too much floor space, and keep it low profile (try not to have a huge pond or a very wide stream that takes up lots of surface area.) A tank would be perfectly fine with just misting and it's easier if you prefer.
Edit- sounds like a good choice, keep up the reading and if you can't find a specific answer, don't hesitate to ask.
Bryan
 

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IMO go with what frog you truly want. No point in compromising and ruining the whole point of why you were interested in the first place, so if it is thumbnails just make sure to do a lot of research before you setup the tank and especially before buying them...
 

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Even if you do decide to go with a thumbnail for your first frog, (and I have no beefs with that as long as you research them well), Please keep in mind that Reticulatus are absolutely NOT a beginners frog! Imitator are the best thumbnail to start with in my opinion. Others will also say that Ventrimaculatus, Lamasi, and Variabilis are all suitable for beginning thumbnails. But I would be willing to bet you will not find a single person that will say that Retics are suitable for beginners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I wasnt thinking of anything large I just think they are visually pleasing and I also read that anthonyi may use it occationally. I might go with a 30g long that I have on hand that used to be a sump for my fish tank I might use how would that size be?
 

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Go old school and start with Green and Black Auratus. You can get a 1.1 pair from certain sponsors. Not only are they absolutely gorgeous, but they're fun to watch and easy to breed.

New dart frog hobbyists these days go straight for other stuff but back in the day mostly everyone started with Auratus, or the other common big colorful frogs.

I don't suggest Anthonyii. It's a really awesome species and and I actually have 3 Sarajungas on hold that I'm picking up soon as they're ready.

I think it's more an interesting species to add to a dart frog collection...I think new keepers would have more fun with something more colorful, even though anythonyii is gorgeous and easy to keep. It's just not as color popping as Auratus or some others. Just my opinion.

There's a reason the large colorful frogs like Tincs, Auratus, leucs, etc. are popular. They're so damn gorgeous that's why! Their colors are the brightest and best in the hobby no matter how common they are.

I don't only pick frogs on their colors though so If you do go for Anthonyii or any tri-color, you'll be more than pleased!
 
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