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Discussion Starter #1
I currently have a 1.80 meter high/1.20 meter wide/ 0.90 meter large tank with 0.0.8 Azureus
I also have a 40cm3 with 0.0.3 Leucomelas

the Azureus being 8/9 months old I will pick 2.1 to put in the small tank and exchange the 5 others for 5 Leucomelas to put in the large tank. How do you select your “keeper Frog”? the most active? The biggest? Or you consider the spot pattern on aesthetics preferences?

I find out that the Azureus don’t climb and some of them are much larger than others. I didn’t see any agression but after consulting the Dendroboard, I feel like the tank is not big enough for more than one female cause the ground floor is just 1 squared meter

I m also planning on getting 3 Tumucumaque, Lorenzo, koetari or Oyapock. Which one do you advice me? My new tank will be 45/45/60cm. I heard Lorenzo can be tricky to breed. Keep in my I’m a beginner frog keeper but experience ball Breeder and begonia lover ( I have more than 100 breed : wild species and hybrid)

thanks for all the knowledge I get here and waiting for the answer of experienced keeper.

Dark.
 

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There is no gold standard for choosing which frogs to keep vs rehoming. Aesthetics, certain traits, personal preference, all are equally valid.

Same goes for what other tincs to get, get whichever you like the most.
 

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Thanks for your answer, my favorite are the Lorenzo but it’s seems to be a delicate morph. Requiring special care and supplement to breed properly. So I’m hesitating
 

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Environmental conditions and supplementation should be no different than any other tinc. Focus on good husbandry first and breeding can be figured out over time. I pick the frogs I want based on my personal preferences first. Breeding is just icing on the cake for me.
 

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If you want to maintain maximum variability, select the most diverse individuals within your group to pair up. There will be other genetic factors beyond phenotype, but without sequencing the frogs, those are difficult to speculate on. You could also choose animals at random, but if you base your choice simply on trying to proliferate more/fewer spots, or a particular shade of blue, you could be unwittingly reducing the robustness of future generations.
My suggestion on the future acquisition would be to avoid the Tumucumaque, as Brazil has never willingly/legally exported them for the pet trade, regardless of how many are unconcerned about turning a blind eye to that fact.
 

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If you want to maintain maximum variability, select the most diverse individuals within your group to pair up. There will be other genetic factors beyond phenotype, but without sequencing the frogs, those are difficult to speculate on. You could also choose animals at random, but if you base your choice simply on trying to proliferate more/fewer spots, or a particular shade of blue, you could be unwittingly reducing the robustness of future generations.
My suggestion on the future acquisition would be to avoid the Tumucumaque, as Brazil has never willingly/legally exported them for the pet trade, regardless of how many are unconcerned about turning a blind eye to that fact.
Thanks Dane, your answer make a lot of sense. I will keep the biggest and bolder azureus without considering the spot ( I prefer big and round vertical on the dorsal line). So the biggest female and a peppered spot male and a huge spot male.

Ok, I didn’t know for this tumucumaque legalities problems. So between the three other, which one do you think is easier to breed and keep healthy?

And also which one are the boldest?
 

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Environmental conditions and supplementation should be no different than any other tinc. Focus on good husbandry first and breeding can be figured out over time. I pick the frogs I want based on my personal preferences first. Breeding is just icing on the cake for me.
Thanks for your answer:

Many tinctorius don’t live under the same climatic conditions , altitude/ temperature/ humidity and biotope. I prefer to chose a species according to my husbandry quality and faculty to maintain the necessary conditions. A frog who doesn’t breed is usually a husbandry problem. So I prefer have it right before the inhabitants arrives.

Do you have any experience with the Lorenzo, Oyapock or Koetari. (Dane convinced me to not get Tumucumaque)
 

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Do you have any experience with the Lorenzo, Oyapock or Koetari.
Of those three, I have only kept Oyapocks, but I have had my breeder pair for nearly 15 years, and I can say that they are some of my favorite tincs. Medium size, striking color and pattern against a verdant backdrop, and they will use all the vertical and horizontal space that you give them. Koetari don't pose any special husbandry challenges as far as I know, and I believe that they are fairly hardy, though Lorenzo are notoriously difficult to successfully breed.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Dane, your experience is very appreciate. When the weather will allow transportation here. I will bought 3 Oyapock if there are disponible. If not I will buy koetari. 👍👍👍
 
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