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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently completed a terrarium build and am noticing there are some areas in the background that could use a touch-up of dirt / coco fibre. Does anyone have recommendations on how to go about doing this while the terrarium is standing -- I'd rather not remove the substrate layers to lay the terrarium down, and I figure the terrarium will need the occasional touch-up through its life and realize that I haven't come across any information on the best way to do this. I saw YouTube videos in which Gorilla Glue was used as a bonding agent and thought I could use use squeeze some dabs of it into spots needing a touch up. Any other thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
is it planted or have animals in it currently?
Neither, and I'm flexible about using an approach that requires a bit of time for curing. But I'm also wondering about what to do in the future when the terrarium is inhabited.
 

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I think you will find once a tank fills in, and has plants growing, you won't notice small areas that need touching up.

I guess the question is, what is the original method you used to create the background? Small areas can be touched up with likely the same method you used to create it. Silicone/Gorilla glue, and then just let it cure.

Post a pic if you can too, it might help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I used silicone to affix cork bark and some other wood to the glass, then filled in with spray foam. I then brushed silicone on to the foam after it cured and covered it in a dirt / coco fibre mix. In hindsight, I wish I'd used more silicone and spread it by hand.

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One of the drawbacks (in this case - other times it's a positive...) of silicone is that once it's cured very little will adhere to it. Including fresh silicone - it won't stick to old silicone either. So if you just mix up more coco/silicone "goo" and put that on your thin spots, what you're relying on as a your backer / foundation (to hold the full weight of the new stuff, plus any water it absorbs, plus any plants that root into it) is the first layer of coco.

For your next build, I strongly advise another technique. I like just cork pieces, with the cracks stuffed with LFS (the "cracked cork mosaic").

good luck!
 

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For your next build, I strongly advise another technique. I like just cork pieces, with the cracks stuffed with LFS (the "cracked cork mosaic").
I'm going to try this on my next build so there's more living space to plant in the background. I did the silicone + cork bark + peat mix (all on the glass, not over foam spray) for my first background and ran into the same issue as @relegated81 -- some bare spots that I don't want to slop more silicone onto to cover up, even though I spread it by hand/wide putty knife. I've discovered I'm not a fan of waiting for that much silicone to cure, so the less I have to apply next time, the better.
 
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