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I've been working on on this: http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/parts-construction/344082-95g-corner-tank-build-journal.html and one of the things I wanted to closely monitor (and automate) was the temperature. It's in a room that, while air conditioned, does get somewhat warm during the summer. I looked into multiple options and ultimately ended up purchasing this product: https://www.amazon.com/SensorPush-Wireless-Thermometer-Hygrometer-Android/dp/B01AEQ9X9I/ and also this: https://www.amazon.com/Outlets-Sockets-Monitoring-Compatible-Assistant/dp/B07B4CDFSM/

So far I really like it. The readings seem to be very accurate based on my own meterings, and I really like the app. However, it doesn't address my automation desires. After doing a bit of research, I came up with a solution!

Within the SensorPush app I created a notification for a temperature above 84 degrees. Then, I connected Smart Life (the outlet's app) to IFTTT. IF: Android Notification > Specific App Notification > SensorPush > above. THEN: Turn on all of my fans.

To make sure that the fans don't run needlessly after the tank has cooled down, I have a few scheduled off times within the Smart Life app.
 

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Cool idea!

You could also do the same with an arduino and thermocouple. Just control the fans with some PWM and use the thermocouple's value to drive the intensity of the fans. Having the fans on @ 10% when heat is normal may be a good idea to keep some ventilation, and slowly ramp up as the heat rises. The nice thing about a thermocouple is how small they are.

Now I've got ideas for my next build...
 

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Cool idea!

You could also do the same with an arduino and thermocouple. Just control the fans with some PWM and use the thermocouple's value to drive the intensity of the fans. Having the fans on @ 10% when heat is normal may be a good idea to keep some ventilation, and slowly ramp up as the heat rises. The nice thing about a thermocouple is how small they are.

Now I've got ideas for my next build...
I've never gotten around to learning arduino. Always thought I should, but never seem to have the time. This solution didn't require any extra time commitment.

Sent from my SM-N950U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Yeah the problem w/ Arduino projects (at least for me) is that I'll start with one thing in mind, and continually add to it until it's super complex and takes longer than I first planned to get it done.
 

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Well, that's a worthwhile use of IFTTT. I do think a thermostat would be simpler, and still work in an internet outage, But...
Heck of a lot more worthwhile than using If This Then That to auto post on twitter.:)
 

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Well, that's a worthwhile use of IFTTT. I do think a thermostat would be simpler, and still work in an internet outage, But...
Heck of a lot more worthwhile than using If This Then That to auto post on twitter.:)
Have an example?

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Having the fans on @ 10% when heat is normal may be a good idea to keep some ventilation, and slowly ramp up as the heat rises.
Electric motors have a habit of doing funny things if you under-power them too much. It's just a little fan, but you probably want to test that for awhile before going into a viv.

Let us know how it goes if you do
Dave
 

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Electric motors have a habit of doing funny things if you under-power them too much. It's just a little fan, but you probably want to test that for awhile before going into a viv.
^ this, motors do funny things when running "underloaded" similarly to being overloaded you can run into heat issues or they can be just plain inconsistent at low levels.

Yeah the problem w/ Arduino projects (at least for me) is that I'll start with one thing in mind, and continually add to it until it's super complex and takes longer than I first planned to get it done.
Additionally I've notice that Arduinos are really good for prototyping a design but aren't the best suited for continual usage. (keep in mind this is all anecdotal experience and could vary from person to person.) You can buy a PID controller and set that up without having to program anything and it's rated for a certain usages from the manufacturer. I used one to make a makeshift Sous vide cooker in college with a crockpot. They work well!
 

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Electric motors have a habit of doing funny things if you under-power them too much. It's just a little fan, but you probably want to test that for awhile before going into a viv.

Let us know how it goes if you do
Dave
Like I said you would use pulse width modulation to control fan speed. This has been done for decades and is well tested.
 
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