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Always google scholar..

Ed
 

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Also, if anybody can help in providing real habitat photos of the streams they breed in, terrestrial shots, leaf litter shots, the more the better. These could really help in building the right setup.

Ben, can your contact get some habitat shots in Suriname?
 

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Perhaps if they stay away from the water till breeding usually, a long tank with a water feature and that half of the tank covered to help hold humidity with the other half screen top (or partial) would be the way to go. You could even build 2 separate vivs that were joined by a tunnel. One relatively dry then a humid tank featuring a large water-feature, even a stream/pond combo. Another possibility may be a dryer tank that is set up to flood periodically creating a nice pond. That may be the way to go if you get some warning that they are wanting to breed. Be like "oh they're getting horny...time to flood the tank" :)
Anyways if any of these ideas are used and work, I expect free frogs! :D
 

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I have spent a lot of time speaking with a fella that worked in the Brownsberg park (he was our intern) and he said that he has seen the collectors pulling these toads from the park.
Is this a legal/ethical source? I understand the desire here to get the frogs breeding in captivity, but has anyone investigated where they are coming from? Seems like folks raiding national parks to collect would be the last people frog conservationists want to be dealing with...

If I am wrong, point it out- I ask out of concern, not just to be a pain.

-Afemoralis
 

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My understanding, and I may be totally wrong, is that they are highly prolific as they are a lowland species and that as a result a quota was permitted for x amount of individuals. Apparently, the only real impediment to importation has been obtaining authorization to import them under the correct genus as opposed to bufo. But Ed will likely know more than me....
 

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Ray has it pretty much correct, these are low land Atelopus, and all Atelopus tend to be prolific that lay clutches that run into the hundreds of eggs at a time. Atelopus tadpoles in general do not tolerate poor water conditions as they tend to utilize streams for egg deposition and tadpole development sites. These tend to have high oxygenation levels and low to zero levels of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. This means good filtration, water changes using good quality water to start and large water volumes.

The reason they were shut down is that in violation of both export regulation and import regulations, these were originally being imported as "dwarf toads" Bufo ssp. This has apparently changed so now we are going to see them again.

If this batch comes in good shape unlike the prior shipments where fat bodies were poor or absent (gross necropsy), then Ben's suggestion has merit as it may be easier to get pre-cycled animals to spawn.

I would strongly suggest seperating the sexes unless you are housing them in a breeding chamber as the males will amplex the females and remain amplexed until they have lost enough weight that they have to release the female or die. This also stresses the female and the extra weight has been seen to cause lesions on the feet of A. zeteki in captivity. The ones I got the last time were thin, so I seperated them by sex and housed them in an enclosures with a screen top and sturdy plants to perch on and was able to stabilize 50% of them. It took very little time (about a month) for the males to return to full condition and calling could be initiated by simply misting the tank heavily. The female didn't show any signs of ovulating eggs for almost a year when she suddenly began to ovulate. I was watching her closely but waited too long and she prolapsed the eggs and died.

Ed
 

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Did you have any luck getting in touch with the seller? I wanted some of the other species he was offering but have not received a return email or phone call...
 

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Good luck for sure Ray. Hope they are in good shape for you and can't wait to see pics.
Logan
 

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Ray definitely give us an update when yours come in! Thank you to all who have provided their first hand accounts of captive management/breeding, but I know still would like to know quite a bit more, especially regarding their habitat parameters, etc. On the topic of breeding conditions, I have never worked with spumarius but the the facility I worked at in Panama used 20 gal longs as their Atelopus breeding enclosures. The tanks were cycled through a sump with filtration media and there was also a powerhead in the tanks to circulate water within it. The tanks were filled with gravel, large stones and some plant cuttings. The tanks were almost completely flooded with a few terrestrial areas present. Once a pair was observed in copulation for more than a few minuets they would be moved into these enclosures until breeding occurred or amplexus ended. The eggs and tadpoles were raised in the same tanks. I used to have some really great pictures of these with glyphus and various pairs in them but they were on an external hard drive that has been stolen. I did have this picture however which you can kind of seen them in the foreground to the right in:

This was basically the same setup used at the Bronx Zoo when I worked with zeteki there, however their animals were cycled prior to introduction to the breeding enclosure. I guess one of my biggest questions with these spumarius coming in whether I should assume they are ready to breed and put them directly into breeding conditions upon arrival, or focus on making sure they are established for several months before attempting to breed them? I guess this really depends on the condition they are coming into the US in.
 

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Ray definitely give us an update when yours come in! Thank you to all who have provided their first hand accounts of captive management/breeding, but I know still would like to know quite a bit more, especially regarding their habitat parameters, etc. On the topic of breeding conditions, I have never worked with spumarius but the the facility I worked at in Panama used 20 gal longs as their Atelopus breeding enclosures. The tanks were cycled through a sump with filtration media and there was also a powerhead in the tanks to circulate water within it. The tanks were filled with gravel, large stones and some plant cuttings. The tanks were almost completely flooded with a few terrestrial areas present. Once a pair was observed in copulation for more than a few minuets they would be moved into these enclosures until breeding occurred or amplexus ended. The eggs and tadpoles were raised in the same tanks. I used to have some really great pictures of these with glyphus and various pairs in them but they were on an external hard drive that has been stolen. I did have this picture however which you can kind of seen them in the foreground to the right in:

This was basically the same setup used at the Bronx Zoo when I worked with zeteki there, however their animals were cycled prior to introduction to the breeding enclosure. I guess one of my biggest questions with these spumarius coming in whether I should assume they are ready to breed and put them directly into breeding conditions upon arrival, or focus on making sure they are established for several months before attempting to breed them? I guess this really depends on the condition they are coming into the US in.
 

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Are these coming in extremely male heavy as they did in the imports of 2004? I notice that at least one seller is refusing to try to sex them, which leads me to believe he may have all males and doesn't want to say it outright.

Hopefully these are also coming in better shape than past imports. The Atelopus I received back in 2004 had horrifying nose rubs, suffered from severe dehydration, and had no fat reserves whatsoever.

I hope those buying are successful.
 

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Hey Donn,

Of the 15 I've seen from the last import only one was a little thin. The rest could be mistaken for juvenile females based on their pear shape. No rubs, really wonderful condition. However, you are correct that they are extremely male heavy.
 
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