Dendroboard banner

Do you conside yourself a Dart Frog:

  • "Breeder" Hobbyist

    Votes: 9 15.0%
  • "Keeper" Hobbyist

    Votes: 40 66.7%
  • "Collector" Hobbyist

    Votes: 7 11.7%
  • "Hybrid" Hobbyist

    Votes: 4 6.7%
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Dart Frog "Breeders", "Keepers" & "Collectors" - What type of Dart Frog Hobbyist are you?

Hi All,

I wanted to run something by you all. Based on my experience in the hobby, it seems that there are three main types of dart frog hobbyist; Breeders, Keepers, and Collectors.
I consider "Dart Frog Breeders" to be those hobbyist who strictly keep dart frogs to raise as many froglets as possible. They may keep a single species of dart frog, or a variety of species, depending on their needs. They usually have many frogs and vivariums, often with minimalist setups, and the bare "necessintials" (necessary+essentials DON'T STEAL MY WORD - LOL) for breeding. Breeding is done for the purpose private or retail sale, research (ie. Harvard University) or conservation (ie. Tesoros de Colombia).
Pros - Tons of babies and inexpensive setups.
Cons - Requires lots of maintenance/work, usually unattractive vivariums, and takes up much space.
"Dart Frog Keepers" seem to be the casual hobbyists who has one or a few frogs and vivariums. They tend to keep the addiction under control, either due to finances, space, or other commitments. They enjoy their frogs and are committed to providing the finest environments and habitats they can afford. Keepers love to lavish their small intimate collections and show them off. Their frog vivariums are often kept as the center piece of a living space, like a living room, family room, or "man cave" (or woman-cave for those of you females out there that hold you own).
Pros - Quality over quantity. Nice vivs and a few select species.
Cons - None that I can think of. This is what we all should strive to be IMHO. Again, just my opinion.
Lastly, "Dart Frog Collectors" are the insanely addicted hobbyists who needs to have as many frogs as he or she can get their little paws on. They want all the newest morphs, and feel the need to have the baddest and the best. Although there are a few experience hobbyist who have taken their time to build such a collection over time, most of the hobbyist in this category usually amass their collection rather quickly. They are the group that often find themselves in trouble, by not being able to keep up with the maintenance of rearing tads, cleaning vivariums, and most of all culturing fruit flies and springtails. Unfortunately, it is the frogs that usually suffer as a results of the collectors behavior. Hopefully, collector learn how to "tone it down" a bit and eventually get their addiction in check.
Pros - Owners is privileged to experience the behaviors of multiple species or morphs. Zoo-like experience at home. And let's not forget the "oos-and-ahhs" of admiration of a huge collection. Although, believe it or not, most tenured collectors do not openly share the vastness of their collections, only sharing their collection with close friends.
Cons - Similar to a breeder - collection requires lots of maintenance/work and takes up much space and time, but collector usually has qua-say nice vivariums vs the basic vivs of the breeder.

Lastly, there is the "Hybrid" Dart Frog Hobbyist. This is probably the largest group and the one that most of today's dart frog hobbyist would identify with. These are the hobbyist who have a combination of traits of from the above listed categories. They fit into one, two, or all three categories. PURE AWESOME SAUCE!
Pros - Yup
Cons - whatever you can think of.

Not really sure how to end this little blurb, so I will just stop and accept the criticism. Somehow it went from a quick thought, to a long-ass post. Having said such, which kind of dart frog hobbyist are you? The Breeder, Keeper, or Collector - or some combination thereof?

Thanks for reading.

-Marc Knox / Hybrid Hobbyist :)

Disclaimer - This is just my thoughts and opinions ti stimulate conversation. My intention is for you to have a fun and healthy dialogue about your experience/habbits and what type of hobbyist you consider yourself to be. So please, have fun and enjoy!
About me - Although, I have kept dart frogs for a very long time, I have always struggled with the breeding aspect of the hobby. From time-to-time my collection has grown quite large (as it is now), and with so many frogs, the tads can rack-up pretty quick. As most of you will agree, tadpole maintenance can be a very time consuming chore...(especially with a large collection). The 1st few times I watched tads morph-out it was very rewarding, but after a few rotations, I felt like "been there, done that". So, early on, I decided to leave the breeding and rearing to the frogs themselves. Once I discovered egg feeders, I sold and gave away (mainly gave away) of all my tincs, leucs, and auratus, and adopted imitators and pumilio...and have been keeping them ever since. (more recently, I added a few large obligates and fants to my collection) I love dart frogs and beautiful vivariums and live by the notion - "I will raise my kids, and they can raise theirs".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
I am new to darts and i enjoy keeping the 2 species i have and breeding is more like a "side quest" sort of thing, i find it fascinating to watch and observe their behaviors for example my vents showed their first breeding behavior with the male calling and female following him as he wiggled his legs. i could have sat and watched for hours ( as i have done with the many species of fish i have bred) if i didn't have to go to work, id like to keep and breed a couple of species but i will be doing it for enjoyment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I am just getting in to frogs but I definitely understand where chillplants is coming from. Although my frogs will be my main feature, I am fascinated with the whole miniature eco system. I am super excited about the frogs, but I am also super excited about getting my tank set up, planted and watching it cycle for the next couple months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
I don't think I would characterize the different "groups" the same way you did. Just because someone has a lot of frog species or morphs, doesn't mean they don't take good care of the frogs or vivs. Likewise just because someone is a breeder doesn't mean they only keep them in order to sell as many as possible. BUT I get and appreciate your disclaimer! ;)

For me, I consider myself a keeper first (and loosely a breeder second). I have many vivs, maybe 7 display vivs and another 7 vivs for froglets, subadults, quarantine, etc. So 14-15 vivs all together, but I only keep those species and/or morphs that I like. A new morph or species being available doesn't mean I'm going to run out and buy them. Whether I like them or not and if I think I can successfully keep them are my primary factors in considering a new frog (or plant for that matter). Many of my frogs are are not really group frogs, so that means I either keep single frog vivs or I keep them in pairs. Pairs mean babies, and in some cases a lot of them. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
My earlier statement may have been taken a little bluntly. I absolutely enjoy my frogs, but they are secondary to my enjoyment of the plants. I do everything I can to make sure the frogs are happy and healthy, but I don't do anything to encourage breeding, like wet/dry seasons or hot/cold temps. The level some people take it to is very impressive, but I just don't have the time or space.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top