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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I see on here that some of you keep some rarer frogs like histrionicus and stuff. I'm wondering if anyone has or knows of someone that has glass frogs in their possession. I'm wondering if they ever came in before like some of the rarer darts and anyone has been able to keep them. It would be great.

Anyways, just looking to see if there is any ideas from any of you about this.

Nick
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know Mark is breeding valerioi. I was just wondering if anybody was lucky enough to have some of the other species.
 

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Hi guys,

I see on here that some of you keep some rarer frogs like histrionicus and stuff. I'm wondering if anyone has or knows of someone that has glass frogs in their possession. I'm wondering if they ever came in before like some of the rarer darts and anyone has been able to keep them. It would be great.

Anyways, just looking to see if there is any ideas from any of you about this.

Nick
Atlanta Botanical Gardens is also working with some of them..

Ed
 

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Mike and Rich from Black Jungle had a really nice set-up last time I was up there, but I'm not sure which species they are working with.

Richard.
 

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Black Jungle is working with H. valeroi, and last I heard Mark has both H. fleischmanni and H. valeroi.
 

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I can't wait to see these guys start circulating around! On par with Atelopus in my opinion. Very exciting! I'll bet investing in some heavy duty filtration would be necessary to keep tads alive. I don't know anything about saltwater, but would a protein skimmer and full-scale reef paraphernalia be necessary for raising up fast water tads? I'm not really sure what a protein skimmer really does, so I'm curious if it is ever enlisted in raising up fast water species. Thanks!JVK
 

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I can't wait to see these guys start circulating around! On par with Atelopus in my opinion. Very exciting! I'll bet investing in some heavy duty filtration would be necessary to keep tads alive. I don't know anything about saltwater, but would a protein skimmer and full-scale reef paraphernalia be necessary for raising up fast water tads? I'm not really sure what a protein skimmer really does, so I'm curious if it is ever enlisted in raising up fast water species. Thanks!JVK
protein skimmers do just what the name implies, they "skim" proteins out of the water before it turns into harmful nitrogenous waste. it usually is a little more complex than skimming and at least the skimmer i have creates a foam of protein which is caught in a vessel and can be emptied, cleaned and replaced.

james
 

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I can't wait to see these guys start circulating around! On par with Atelopus in my opinion. Very exciting! I'll bet investing in some heavy duty filtration would be necessary to keep tads alive. I don't know anything about saltwater, but would a protein skimmer and full-scale reef paraphernalia be necessary for raising up fast water tads? I'm not really sure what a protein skimmer really does, so I'm curious if it is ever enlisted in raising up fast water species. Thanks!JVK
I would suggest you read up on the care of some of the stream dwelling loaches coming into the aquarium hobby, since these fast stream dwellers may present the same challenges as fast water tads.
 

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I would suggest you read up on the care of some of the stream dwelling loaches coming into the aquarium hobby, since these fast stream dwellers may present the same challenges as fast water tads.
I bought a hillstream loach last week as a test subject in a stream tank, and it's doing great, knock on wood. JVK

P.S I read something Ed said awhile back about atelopus tads (at least some) requiring "brown diatoms" in their diets, so I would expect in specialized stream breeders both habitat and dietary considerations would need to be taken into account, i.e. extreme habitat=extreme diet. I've often wondered if failure in Scaphiophryne gottleibei tads might be a lack of understanding of these items? JVK
 

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I bought a hillstream loach last week as a test subject in a stream tank, and it's doing great, knock on wood. JVK

P.S I read something Ed said awhile back about atelopus tads (at least some) requiring "brown diatoms" in their diets, so I would expect in specialized stream breeders both habitat and dietary considerations would need to be taken into account, i.e. extreme habitat=extreme diet. I've often wondered if failure in Scaphiophryne gottleibei tads might be a lack of understanding of these items? JVK
That is the diet of atelopus in the wild, depending on the clutch (even with the same parents) there has been between 20-80% survivorship using stones with a paste made from fish flakess placed on it. Atelopus tadpoles appear to not feed well off of the surface or even the flat bottom of an enclosure requiring some structure with food on it...

S. gottleibi has a different method of feeding see Alytes web - The tadpoles of <i>Scaphiophryne gottlebei</i> (Microhylidae: Scaphiophryninae) and <i>Mantella expectata</i> (Mantellidae: Mantellinae) from Isalo Massif, south-central Madagascar

Hijack over

Ed
 

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protein skimmers do just what the name implies, they "skim" proteins out of the water before it turns into harmful nitrogenous waste. it usually is a little more complex than skimming and at least the skimmer i have creates a foam of protein which is caught in a vessel and can be emptied, cleaned and replaced.

james
People should keep in mind that an important part of this function is changes in surface tension.. it is much harder to skim in freshwater than it is in salt water.

At least with Atelopus, water quality is critical. Zero ammonia, zero nitrite and nitrates as low as possible

Ed
 

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a freshwater protien skimmer is a much larger unit than the common and easily available salt water ones, as it is far harder to get the bubbles that form in freshwater to hold up long enough to reach the collection cup. An external canister filter with bioballs, floss and carbon will deal with the ammonia & nitrites, waste particles and impurities. Partial water changes once or twice a week will then remove excess nitrates, but they can raise to much higher levels before they cause toxicity problems. it would be easy to create a gentle flow through the tank by putting the filter inlet at one end and the outlet the other. I'd aerate the tank as well, but be sure to screen all suction/inlet pipes or the tads will be sucked into the filters

it was interesting reading about the feeding - look at the DD Aquarium solution feeds - H20 pro reef paste is designed to be stuck on the glass or rocks of an aquarium to feed fish, inverts & the micro fauna/corals - and there is a freshwater version approaching launch that provides a different blend of vegetable, algae & fish protein. I am the designer & manufacturer of the feed range for DD so hopefully its ok to mention them here as they would certainly fulfil the voracious appetite of the tadpoles. - We use similar blends of proteins to manufacture fish feeds and baits and regularly observe huge clouds of wild tadpoles eating the bait thrown into lakes and streams.

cheers Marcus
 

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I was under the impression that Mark Pepper is working with around half a dozen species of glass frog. H. valerioi is the first one that will be available.

Breeding these frogs pose quite a challenge to many hobbyists. There are a few breeders in the states working with glass frogs who can't even get their frogs to breed. As soon as you _do_ get them to breed you have to put up with the 18(ish) month larval stage. Just ridiculous.

I would not expect these guys to be like the Veradero imitator which was released and then saturated the hobby. If you're interested in working with glass frogs, find a breeder, put your name on a waiting list, and expect to wait a while.
 

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Fleichmanni is my favorite. Though I don't want to wait to see if they're ever common, I do want a few of either species in the next year or two. Glass frogs are some of my favorites. Though I will admit that their coloration or lack of isn't as impressive as in person, though I've never seen fleichmanni in person. I've seen the other species mentioned at black jungle. They're in a massive enclosure but are easy to find if you just turn over the broadest based leaf. I don't think they've had luck breeding them. They are on loan fro ABG.
 

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I've seen the other species mentioned at black jungle. They're in a massive enclosure but are easy to find if you just turn over the broadest based leaf. I don't think they've had luck breeding them. They are on loan fro ABG.
They recently posted a clutch on their facebook page.
 
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