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Hey I was hoping some of you could offer some help. I have an azureus that is wasting away... I'm trying to get a fecal sample but if nothing goes in nothing is going to come out. (or I just can't find it) I have placed a small dish with pedi-a-lyte in there and the tank is 75ish with 85ish% humidity. What would you reccomend to stimulate it's appetite? Keep in mind it is not eating (much). Is there a soak or drops? It's tank mate before I seperated them is fat and healthy. Please, any assistnce would be welcome.

Mike
 

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Dr. Frye has some Metronidazole, which is supposed to help non-thriving frogs with appetitie stimulating affects. "This drug gets frogs eating." Dr. Frye. If I remember correctly, it is a light sensitive drug that needs to be stored in the dark with a fairly short shelf life. It comes with a syringe that is used to remove the medication from a bag and put into a dropper to administer to the frog's back. Of course, I would check with him first.

http://www.fryebrothersfrogs.com/page3.htm

Good luck!
 

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And for Pedialyte to work, you probably have to force the frog to soak. I use disposable plastic containers and fill the container with enough pedialyte the frog can sit in it without danger of drowning. Put the frog in the container for 30 minutes to an hour and then return it to its quarantine viv. I don't know if the Pedialyte will help your situation but I don't think just making it available for a voluntary soak will help much.
 

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Brent,

I don't mean to take this thread in another direction, but what symptoms/circumstances prompt you to use Pedialyte? In other words, at what point do you administer a forced soak?

Thanks,

David

bbrock said:
And for Pedialyte to work, you probably have to force the frog to soak. I use disposable plastic containers and fill the container with enough pedialyte the frog can sit in it without danger of drowning. Put the frog in the container for 30 minutes to an hour and then return it to its quarantine viv. I don't know if the Pedialyte will help your situation but I don't think just making it available for a voluntary soak will help much.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Dave,
Thanks, I'll see what I can come up with. I'm sure I can find it around here. That was the stuff I was thinking about but couldn't recall the name.
Brent,
Thanks for your input, the bowl of pedialyte is in the quarantine tank and yes the frog goes in it and sits for an hour or so on it's own. The pedialyte is used to help keep the frog hydrated and to restore some electrolytes since it's not eating too much. So forcing the soaks and adding to the stress isn't necessary....yet.

I just need to get him to eat enough to get a good enough sample to examine.

Thanks,
Mike
 

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dmartin72 said:
Brent,

I don't mean to take this thread in another direction, but what symptoms/circumstances prompt you to use Pedialyte? In other words, at what point do you administer a forced soak?
I'm no expert on amphibian medicine and the Frye brothers can attest to that. But I soak frogs in Pedialyte anytime they look "off" or depressed, or if they get dehydrated for some reason. I've only had to soak frogs a half dozen times and most of those were RETF.

Sounds like Mike did the right thing here by letting the frog soak voluntarily but making sure that it did soak. This is a case where I would definately want the frog to soak to replenish electrolytes. Also, I don't remember if Pedialyte contains sugar. If not, adding a little sugar (preferably glucose or fructose - but table sucrose table sugar works in a pinch) can give the frog enough energy for a rally.

Again, I'm no expert but this has worked for me and other people and is not much changed from the information in the old Hesselhaus book.
 

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If you know someone that cultures waxworms, I've seen even the most finicky eaters go nuts over them. (if you can get them small enough) Usually to get appropriate sized ones, you have to culture them yourself.
 

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You can also place a drop or two of sugar solution on the frogs. This will often help to perk them up if they are thin.

If you have access to feline clinicare (talk to your vet) this is a good tube feeding agent that is easily digestiable and can get the appetite going again.

One of the things you may need to check for is impactions as this can prevent a frog from feeding and will prevent a frog from passing a fecal.

Ed
 
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