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Looking for some folks keeping Cruziohyla craspedopus that can shed some light on their tanks. Sizes, humidty, temps, etc.

Are you introducing any uvb?
How many animals in the tank?
Any issues?

Currently have 5 juvies hanging out around 78F and 80% humidty. Trying to get a plan together for their next tank.
 

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I have not kept them, but they're pretty cool. Probably similar to other Cruziohyla's, I have a description on the C. calcarifer thread. It might help.
https://www.dendroboard.com/forum/tree-frogs/347158-splendid-leaf-frog-c-calcarifer.html
Thanks!


I picked up 5 juvies, lost 1 the first week. 2 are doing amazing and the other 2 so so.

The two so so ones I pulled and put in a smaller tank with papertowels so I can monitor. One is incredibly fat, the other is slightly skinny. The fat one I found on the floor of the tank so that was my prompt to pull him. I am doing a Pedialyte soak today and will watch close. They seem to only be eating FF right now vs crickets but hopefully that will change soon.

What temps are you keeping at and are you introducing any UVB?
 

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It seems the Cruziohyla like to sleep on horizontal surfaces. I have them sleeping on the "ground" occasionally, and it doesn't seem to be a red flag like it is for RETF. They just do that sometimes. Big leaves that grow horizontally like rubber plants and some philodendrons seem to work well.
Ixnay on the pedialyte, unless there is a real concern. They can appear really skinny when sleeping, but check them at night- they puff right back up.
Mine are just kept at room temp- 70-74F daytime, 67-70F night. I keep every specimen in its own enclosure. They seem to be aggressive feeders, but not aggressive in the way of fighters. But the feeding thing can lead to one getting thin and weaker while the other hogs the food and grows. Keep in mind, I have C. sylviae and not craspedopus, but i would think they'd be similar. Mine are getting BIG now that everyone can eat for themselves.
Just an amazingly beautiful Genus!
 

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It seems the Cruziohyla like to sleep on horizontal surfaces. I have them sleeping on the "ground" occasionally, and it doesn't seem to be a red flag like it is for RETF. They just do that sometimes. Big leaves that grow horizontally like rubber plants and some philodendrons seem to work well.
Ixnay on the pedialyte, unless there is a real concern. They can appear really skinny when sleeping, but check them at night- they puff right back up.
Mine are just kept at room temp- 70-74F daytime, 67-70F night. I keep every specimen in its own enclosure. They seem to be aggressive feeders, but not aggressive in the way of fighters. But the feeding thing can lead to one getting thin and weaker while the other hogs the food and grows. Keep in mind, I have C. sylviae and not craspedopus, but i would think they'd be similar. Mine are getting BIG now that everyone can eat for themselves.
Just an amazingly beautiful Genus!

What are you having luck as feeders? Mine seem to not touch crickets. Can only do FF for so long. Had great luck with small hornworms and soldier fly larvae. I have 3 housed together in a 12x12x24 and you can definitely tell who the fatty is. I might separate the runt. Are you using any UVB on them? I have a 6% and one is in light 24/7 and the other two enjoy being under leaves toward the bottom.
 

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I have a group of 4 Cruziohyla craspedopus that I have been raising for about 5 months and they are getting to adult size now. Tank size is 18x18x36 exo planted with large leaf philodendron spp.. I will second Ravage in saying that they do search for stable horizontal leaves to rest upon and will fall asleep on the floor if they are going too hard feeding that night. Temperature stays at about 75 degrees Fahrenheit with daily fluctuation of ±2 or 3 degrees and humidity is at 70%-90%. Temperature is my biggest concern due to the temperatures down here in Texas this summer. I had a similar issue in the sense that two of the animals were much larger and were probably hoarding all the food. I pulled the 2 smaller individuals and put them in a smaller tank (5.5 gallon vertical conversion) that was more heavily planted with pothos so that they could have more access to and less competition for food. Feeding 4 times a week. I am not using UVB but I am supplementing 1/4" crickets every third feeding with supervite. All 4 appear healthy and well fed and I have been treated to calling on certain nights.
I have found that access to a shallow water bowl is a way to allow them to soak and relax on their own if they are stressed.
 

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I have a group of 4 Cruziohyla craspedopus that I have been raising for about 5 months and they are getting to adult size now. Tank size is 18x18x36 exo planted with large leaf philodendron spp.. I will second Ravage in saying that they do search for stable horizontal leaves to rest upon and will fall asleep on the floor if they are going too hard feeding that night. Temperature stays at about 75 degrees Fahrenheit with daily fluctuation of ±2 or 3 degrees and humidity is at 70%-90%. Temperature is my biggest concern due to the temperatures down here in Texas this summer. I had a similar issue in the sense that two of the animals were much larger and were probably hoarding all the food. I pulled the 2 smaller individuals and put them in a smaller tank (5.5 gallon vertical conversion) that was more heavily planted with pothos so that they could have more access to and less competition for food. Feeding 4 times a week. I am not using UVB but I am supplementing 1/4" crickets every third feeding with supervite. All 4 appear healthy and well fed and I have been treated to calling on certain nights.
I have found that access to a shallow water bowl is a way to allow them to soak and relax on their own if they are stressed.



Interesting. Mine are nowhere near adult size and they are roughly 3 months old. I am going to go back to basics with them. Offering crickets in a dish every night. I have one who is struggling right now so I have him pulled and in his 5 gal quarantine tank on paper towels. I am not sure why I am having such hard luck with these guys. Some of the easiest care requirements out there.
 

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Mine were around 5 months oow when I got them so they are around 10 months now. Sorry for the confusion. Yes, a shallow bowl helps make feedings more efficient. Be careful to not flood the enclosure with crickets. This might stress them out and decrease the chances of actually eating the crickets.
 
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