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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking forward to spring here in Michigan when the peepers start peeping. Anyone keep them? Any special tips?
 

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I've worked with them in the past. They are just like any small hylid... Small food items.. When I worked with them we kept in a temperature controlled room.

Ed
 

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Just don't put the viv in your room...at least not for a couple of months in early spring. They are already calling down here.
 

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Just don't put the viv in your room...at least not for a couple of months in early spring. They are already calling down here.
This... they are incredibly loud for such a small creature, especially in an enclosed room. Putting these in your bedroom would be near suicide, might as well house some cicadas in the room at that point. Source: tried keeping them as a kid, was driven half to insanity.
 

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Last year I went down to a creek about a mile from my house at dusk in the spring to see some. They started calling at 4-5 PM but it was very frustrating because you could be standing right over top of them and not see them in the vegetation and sticks. Then it began to get dark, and the males climbed out and perched on top of large leaves in plain sight and called- it was very cool to see them all around you. I didn't keep any, but I'm hoping they will come up to my pond now that I have it built. If not, I may go down and try to get a few males and females if I can find them for the pond, but I have a feeling they will find their way just like the 3-5 green frogs I that live there now.
A question for people who keep them year-round: What do they do outside of "breeding season"? Once they stop calling in the spring, I've only found them a couple of times during the summer. I do plenty of searching and find all kinds of frogs, toads, salamanders, some snakes, etc. but only found peepers twice in a neighbor's garden. Are they more reclusive during this time in captivity too, or just harder to find in the wild?
Bryan
 

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I've found them pretty much all year except for the dead of winter (which is late nov to very early jan here)...usually accidentally when they aren't calling. I always seem to find them near seepages or in marginal areas, but haven't seen them near moving water. The densest population I have ever seen was on mountain laurels on the banks of a man-made pond in Tennessee...there were literally dozens per bush, but this was during breeding season.
 

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Last year I went down to a creek about a mile from my house at dusk in the spring to see some. They started calling at 4-5 PM but it was very frustrating because you could be standing right over top of them and not see them in the vegetation and sticks. Then it began to get dark, and the males climbed out and perched on top of large leaves in plain sight and called- it was very cool to see them all around you. I didn't keep any, but I'm hoping they will come up to my pond now that I have it built. If not, I may go down and try to get a few males and females if I can find them for the pond, but I have a feeling they will find their way just like the 3-5 green frogs I that live there now.
A question for people who keep them year-round: What do they do outside of "breeding season"? Once they stop calling in the spring, I've only found them a couple of times during the summer. I do plenty of searching and find all kinds of frogs, toads, salamanders, some snakes, etc. but only found peepers twice in a neighbor's garden. Are they more reclusive during this time in captivity too, or just harder to find in the wild?
Bryan
A few points...

Peepers are very cool pets. Outside the breeding season they are normally found under loose bark on standing trees or fallen logs. If there is a pile of old boards around in a grassy area within a few yards of water, that is a good place to look. I have a friend who has turtle ponds in his basement. One year he put some peeper tads in the turtle tubs. He didn't collect them(tads) all in time and as a result has a permenant population that breeds year 'round in his basement. They eat spiders, flies, moths, etc. He keeps a lot of things, and feeder escapees are sort of the norm...

In a viv, they will take FFs, the maggots, and Springtails, etc. Small moths, and pinhead crickets. I find them to be rather shy as captives, but will feed openly. Plus, the drab tones are perfect for sitting still and becoming invisible in a well designed enclosure... They are communal, and 3 per 20 gal should be a good ratio; male, female, or any combination of the 2. They do enjoy small pockets of standing water, and will go to these sights to hunt in the viv as well as nature. These frogs are small, fast, and blend in making opening the tank a sweaty job. Not that you wouldn't have known that, or had proper experience...

I hope I have helped in some way.

JBear
 

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Wouldn't it be easier (and very cool) to set up an outdoor habitat to attract native species such as these? You could do some landscaping. If I had the land, I definitely would set up a wildlife pond.
 

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Last year I went down to a creek about a mile from my house at dusk in the spring to see some. They started calling at 4-5 PM but it was very frustrating because you could be standing right over top of them and not see them in the vegetation and sticks. Then it began to get dark, and the males climbed out and perched on top of large leaves in plain sight and called- it was very cool to see them all around you. I didn't keep any, but I'm hoping they will come up to my pond now that I have it built. If not, I may go down and try to get a few males and females if I can find them for the pond, but I have a feeling they will find their way just like the 3-5 green frogs I that live there now.
A question for people who keep them year-round: What do they do outside of "breeding season"? Once they stop calling in the spring, I've only found them a couple of times during the summer. I do plenty of searching and find all kinds of frogs, toads, salamanders, some snakes, etc. but only found peepers twice in a neighbor's garden. Are they more reclusive during this time in captivity too, or just harder to find in the wild?
Bryan
Wouldn't it be easier (and very cool) to set up an outdoor habitat to attract native species such as these? You could do some landscaping. If I had the land, I definitely would set up a wildlife pond.
I believe he has taken up this option.

JBear
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
A few points...

Peepers are very cool pets. Outside the breeding season they are normally found under loose bark on standing trees or fallen logs. If there is a pile of old boards around in a grassy area within a few yards of water, that is a good place to look. I have a friend who has turtle ponds in his basement. One year he put some peeper tads in the turtle tubs. He didn't collect them(tads) all in time and as a result has a permenant population that breeds year 'round in his basement. They eat spiders, flies, moths, etc. He keeps a lot of things, and feeder escapees are sort of the norm...

In a viv, they will take FFs, the maggots, and Springtails, etc. Small moths, and pinhead crickets. I find them to be rather shy as captives, but will feed openly. Plus, the drab tones are perfect for sitting still and becoming invisible in a well designed enclosure... They are communal, and 3 per 20 gal should be a good ratio; male, female, or any combination of the 2. They do enjoy small pockets of standing water, and will go to these sights to hunt in the viv as well as nature. These frogs are small, fast, and blend in making opening the tank a sweaty job. Not that you wouldn't have known that, or had proper experience...

I hope I have helped in some way.

JBear
I have looked for them in times out of breeding season but never found them. I know a herpetologist (who zBrinks knows, too) who does field work in late spring in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and says he sees them "hoppin' all over the forest floor" shortly after breeding season on moist evenings. I've gone out in deciduous forests in Muskegon County, Michigan and looked for them but never seen them.

I know of one wetland in that county has a deafening chorus during the breeding season. I can find frogs walking around in waders in the daytime, clinging to cattails and other vegetation.

My questions are two: Can you feed a new metamorph peeper fruit flies? Or is the peeper too small for the FF? And, what time of day do you look for them under lumber and bark?
 

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I know of one wetland in that county has a deafening chorus during the breeding season. I can find frogs walking around in waders in the daytime, clinging to cattails and other vegetation.

My questions are two: Can you feed a new metamorph peeper fruit flies? Or is the peeper too small for the FF? And, what time of day do you look for them under lumber and bark?
I've found them out of season in damp leaflitter... Rarely have I ever seen them under cover as described by JBear. I have also found new metamorphs hiding in exposed gravel bars in a slow moving stream.
New metamorphs can be fed just like a small dendrobatid. I've found them at all different times during the day since they are typically under cover. I've been in choruses where you had to watch where you put your feet but to talk with someone, you had to get close and yell to be heard...

Ed
 

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I've found them out of season in damp leaflitter... Rarely have I ever seen them under cover as described by JBear. I have also found new metamorphs hiding in exposed gravel bars in a slow moving stream.
New metamorphs can be fed just like a small dendrobatid. I've found them at all different times during the day since they are typically under cover. I've been in choruses where you had to watch where you put your feet but to talk with someone, you had to get close and yell to be heard...

Ed
There is a railroad that is bordered by vernal pools and woods very close to me. There is a lot of debris laying around like boards, card board, bricks, large rocks, etc. The railroad slope is gravel/stone. On the gravel side of the pool, the peepers can be found sometimes in small groups(particularly newly metamorphs) under/amidst this debris. On the woods side, they are found mostly under the bark as I described above. This is not intended to be the facts across the board, simply where they are found by me, in my local habitat.

I hope to have helped.

JBear
 

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I have looked for them in times out of breeding season but never found them. I know a herpetologist (who zBrinks knows, too) who does field work in late spring in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and says he sees them "hoppin' all over the forest floor" shortly after breeding season on moist evenings. I've gone out in deciduous forests in Muskegon County, Michigan and looked for them but never seen them.

I know of one wetland in that county has a deafening chorus during the breeding season. I can find frogs walking around in waders in the daytime, clinging to cattails and other vegetation.

My questions are two: Can you feed a new metamorph peeper fruit flies? Or is the peeper too small for the FF? And, what time of day do you look for them under lumber and bark?
I normally go late morning to early afternoon. Sometimes early evening, but they are normally not found hiding as the night comes on. Just my experience...

JBear
 

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I have looked for them in times out of breeding season but never found them. I know a herpetologist (who zBrinks knows, too) who does field work in late spring in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and says he sees them "hoppin' all over the forest floor" shortly after breeding season on moist evenings. I've gone out in deciduous forests in Muskegon County, Michigan and looked for them but never seen them.

I know of one wetland in that county has a deafening chorus during the breeding season. I can find frogs walking around in waders in the daytime, clinging to cattails and other vegetation.

My questions are two: Can you feed a new metamorph peeper fruit flies? Or is the peeper too small for the FF? And, what time of day do you look for them under lumber and bark?
Here are some pics for reference... The one pic you can see my fingers in the left side, and as a size reference, he was being contained/reared in a FF culture cup. The gold belly pic shows how big he is compared to the lid/lip of the culture cup. I hope to have helped.

JBear
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
crazy winter here in MI... I heard a report of a peeper peeping last weekend- very early for Michigan.
 

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They are simple creatures that require just the same viv conditions as a green treefrog, etc. There is nothing special to note about specific care requirements. A substrate, a few plants, and a small water bowl. Be simple, or creative and you will be fine if you consider basic requirements.

JBear
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My Western Chorus Frog/Spring Peeper vivarium. Caught two of each this spring. They are both native to this area, and they were all caught within about a half mile of each other.



 
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